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peal to our consciences, and Jays us under paragraph, which we have reason to believe obligations, not easily evaded, to a propore is authentic. tional degree of piety and virtue."

“ A distribution of books of devotion is to

take place in the Navy, in the following pro; WILTS AUXILIARY' BIËLE SOCIETY.

portions, viz one copy of the New Testa: A numerous and niost respectable meeting ment, two Common Prayer-books, and two of the inliabitants of this county was held in Psalters, for a mess of eight ben; and obe the town hall, at Devizes, on Wednesday, Bible to every two messes.* the 19th of August last, for the purpose of forming an Auxiliary Bible Society, Thomas

YEARLY MEETING OF THE SOAKERS. Grimston Estcourt, Esq. M. P. in the chair, We have been favoured with a copy of the The expectations excited by the interest letter, addressed by the Yearly Meeting, to which this gentleman had taken in all the their brethren throughout the world; from measures preparatory to the general meeting, which we extract a few passages. were fully realised, when, by the avowal of “ Seeing the infinite value of love, that his own sentiments, in a dignified and elo- indispensable qualification of a true disciple, quent address, he openen the business of the we are desirous of pressing it on every indiday. The Rev. Mr. Owen and the Rev. vidual, to examine impartially, how far he Mr. Hughes, who had been invited to attend, reels it to flourish in his own mind, and to having addressed the ineeting with their usual influence all his actions, thus inducing others eloquence and effect, the resolutions for to follow him, as he is endeavouring 10 folförming the society were moved by the Rev. low Christ. Aud we believe that nothing T. A. Merhuen, and unaniinously adopted. will be so lavourable to the preservation of The Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of the this holy disposition as humility of heart, a diocese was announced to have accepted the temper in which we constantly see ourselves office of president to this sveiety. The vice- unworthy of the least of the Lord's mercies presidents are:-Tlie Marquis of Lansdown; and dependent only on his compassion for Viscoint Bulingbroke; Lord Bruce; Sir Figre our finał acceptance. Seeing also, that no Cogte, K. B.; Sir John Methuen Poore, awakened mind can be without a view to a Bart.; Richard long, Esq. M. P.; Thomas better and an enduring state, and that no Grimston Estcourt, Esq. M. P.; and Joshua one knows how soon he may be called to put Smith, Esq. M. P.: the treasurers, Mr. off mutability; let us bear in perpetual re Salmon and Mr Hughes: and the secretaries, collection, that in the state to which we Rev. T. A. Methuen and Rev. R. Elliott. aspire, there is nothing but eternal love, jny,

The proceedings of the day afforded a and adoration, in the presence of Him through display of the most pleasing unanimity, and whuse love we were first awakened. ** of feeling which only the object of such a “ Before we quit the subject of Christian meeting could inspire. ' Clergy and laily, love, let os reinind you that no limit of name charchmen and dissenters, male and female, can bound its influence. In this season of all seemed fervenuly to unite in the benevo- almost un precedented pressure on some of lent wish, that every poor family in the the poorer classes of our countrymen, wo county might be furnished with a Bible; dcem it particularly desirable, that our dear and that this inight, in process of time, be friends every where should not be backward the happy case of every family in the world. in examining into their distresses; but libeA considerable sum was inmediaiely sub- rat in contributing a due proportion of relief. scribed. A poor labouring girl was found to Many are allowed to have temporal posses. have contributed a guinea,

sions sufficient to do tlris with comparative For the furtherance of this great object, ease.

Let these, therefore, remember that the inhabitants of Westbury (in this county) they are but stowards, and let them seek to most liberally furnished this society with a be good and faithful stewards. And it is donation of 94.. 166. od. and with an annual probable that others, not equally abounding subscription of 631. 8s. The Westbury Sun in the good things of this life, may find that, ciety is now becone a branch of that esta- in using moderation in their own expendiblished for the county. A Branch Society ture, they may have wherewith to supply has also been formed at Warminster, in this the wants of others, and to make the heart of county, which has been must liberally supo the poor man sing for joy. O, the blessing of ported.

clothing the naked and feeding the hungry! SUPPLY OF BIBLES AND PRAYER-BOOKS

Who would not desire to be entitled to a share

in it! We insert, with pleasure, the following " Moderation in personat and donjestic

TO TIE NAVY,

expenses

, every way becomes the followers of to extravagance in others, and proinpt there lowly-hearted Saviour. We are therefore to use exertions for supporting an appear engaged to press it upon our young friends ance which may divert them from the true just setting out in life, to beware of needless business of life--the daily study to be apo expense in the furniture of tiveir houses, and proved in the sight of God." in their general domestic habits. Even those · We subjoin one passage more. who think their property may entitle them to " Although the infamous traffic in slaves abundance or to elegance, by indulging in has been abolished by law, we desire friends costly habits are setting but an ill exaraple not to forget that slavery still exists within to those of more contracted means; and as the British empire, aud 10 suffer their synswe are but too apt to copy that which cuin- pathy still to flow towards its oppressed vigo cides with our natural disposition, our want tims." of circumspection may prove an incitement

VIEW OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS.

SPAIN.

giments, and very large magazines of clotha In our last number we traced Lord Welling. ing, provisions, and aminunition. Lord Wel ton's progress to the 4th of August, when his lington says, it is impossible to describe the head-quarters were at Cuellar. His lordship joy manifested by the inhabitants of Madrid having ascertained, that the army of Mar- on the arrival of his army. Our loss, in ali mont (who it seems is not dead, as was res these operations, did not exceed sixty killed, ported), which had retired on Burgos, would and about one hundred wounded. On the not be in a condition to take the field again 18th, Lord Wellington was still at Madrid, for some time, determined on advancing to Joseph's army had at that date abandoned Madrid. 'He moved from Cuellar on the Toledo, which was taken possession of by » 6th of August, reached Segovia on the 7th, party of Guerillas, and was on its march ap. and St. Ildefonso on the 8th, In passing parently to Valencia. In the mean time, through the mountains, no opposition was General Maitland, with the army from Sicily experienced; near Magalahonda on the 11th and Minorca, had effected his landing at a large body of French cavalry was driven Alicante, and was in communication with off, but afterwards returned. The Portuguese Lord Wellington. cavalry were ordered to attack them; but as The event wbich stands next in point of they advanced, they appear to have been importance to the caplure of Madrid, is tha seized with a panic, and turned back before raising of the siege of Cadiz, which tooks they reached the enemy. Their fight was place on the night of the 24th, and the arrested by a body of German cavalry, who morning of the 25th of August. The ene, likewise stopped the farther progress of the my left behind a very numerous artillery enemy, though with some loss to themselves; and a large quantity of stores and powder, and some more of our troops appearing in most of which, hywever, was, rendered use: sight, the French cavalry finally withdrew. less; and he appears to have retreated with On the 12th, the army moved forward and very great precipitation. Col. Skerrelt, with entered Madrid. Joseph Bonaparte retired a body of troops, both British and Spanish, with his army towards Toledo, leaving a had previously landed at Huelva, with the garrison in the Retiro. On the evening of view of distracting the attention of Marshal the 13th, the Retiro was completely invested, Soult, and he has since taken possession of and preparations were made for an attack Seville. Soult'sjmotions, and those of General on the succeeding morning, when the gover- Drouet, are closely watched by General Hill, nor offered to capitulate. The garrison, to who had advanced northward of the Sierra the number of 2,500, surrendered as prisoners Morena, of war, and were allowed its honours and their Astorga, Bilboa, Tordesillas, and Guada. baggage. The stores found in the place were ļaxara, bave fallen into the hands of the immense ; 189 pieces of brass ordnance in Spaniards. It appears, however, that the excellent condition, 900 barrels of powder, Spanish army of Murcia, commanded by 20,000 stands of arms, the eagles of two re- General O'Donnell, had sustained a severe

deseat on the 21st of July, from a body of down to the September, when the 17th French troops inferior in number. The Cor- Bulletin is dated at Ghjat, about hulf way tez had determined on bringing this General between Smulenek and Muscow, no batile of to trial.

any moment had taken place. The Russians The French appear to be making great continued their retreat to Moscow, destroy. efforts to retrieve their losses in Spain. Mas. ing the magazines iu their way; the French sena is said to bave marched across the Pyadvancing in pursuit. The Russians are said yennees with 10,000 men, to reinforce Mar- to be preparing for a vigorous stand at Mos. mont's shattered army, and to resume the cow. Should any reverse overtake Bonachief command; and a part of this army has parte at this point, he will be placed in very already been making advances as far as Vulo perilous circumstances indeed: winter will ladolid. The troops employed in the siege bave commenced, with au imegse extent of of Cadiz will make a large addition to the hostile territory in his rear. forces under Soult and Drouet ; Joseplis corps Battles bave occurred in other parts of will probably connect itself with Suchet, and Russia, in which both sides clain the victory. the garrisons in every part of Spain will be In one fought at Polotsk, the French general, drained to swell the numbers of these dii the Duke of Revgio, was severely wounded; ferent armies. We have, however, a strong and from the French not having since adconfidence, that, with the blessing of Provi- vanced in that quarter, it may be presumed dence continued to vur arms, we shall yet the Russians had the advantage. The siege succeed in defeating this formidable combi- of Riga has not yet commenced. nation of hostile means ; though perhaps, The conduct of Sweden has hitherto apo after all, the question, whether Spain will be peared dubious and vacillating. It is at finally freed from the yoke of Bonaparte, may length said to have been decided, at an turn as much on ihe result of the campaign interview between the Emperor Alexander in the plains of Muscuvy, as on that in the and Bernadotte, at Abo, in Finland, at Peninsula.

which Lord Cathcart assisted, that Sweden

should take part in the war against the WAR IN THE NORTH.

French, and that a body of Swedish tronpe Since our last number went to press the will be forthwitha landed in Germany. series of French Bulletins from the 13th to the 17th, inclasive, have been received in

SICILY. this country. The first of these announces The constitution of the government of this the capture of Smolensk, after a long and island, has undergone an entire change. A sanguinary contest, in which each side, with parliament assembled at Palermo on the the customary proneness to exaggeration, af- 20th July, which has adopted the constitufects to have obtained great advantagestion of Great Britain for its general model, over the other. The loss of men was proba- and has abolished the feudal laws and barobly equal, the ground having been well con- nial rights and monopolies. This favourable tested, and the Russians retiring without chauge has been owing principally to the nodisorder. The fruits of victory, however, deration, good sense, and firmness of Lord were, without doubt, reaped by the French. William Bentinck, who is both our ambassaThey entered as conquerors into Smolensk, dor and commander in chief in that island. but not till the magazines, and indeed a great part of the town, had been destroyed.

UNITED STATES. On the day after the evacuation of Smolensk, The news of the repeal of the Orders in Bonaparte made a great effort to turn one of Council had been received in America, but the wings of the Russian army, as it was re- was not likely to produce those conciliatory tiring. His purpose, however, was frustrated, effects whiclı were by some so confidently and a severe contest ensued, in which it is anticipated. The National Intelligencer, the evident, from Bonaparte's own bulletin, that organ of the Government, declares, that this nu ipaterial advantage was obtained by him. repeal will not satisfy the just expectations of The Russians retired unbroken and without America. They must bave indemnity for losing a gan. The French general, Gudin, the past, and security for the future. What who commanded, was killed, and the bulletin is the nature of the indemnity they require admits a loss of 3200 nien in killed and is not stated; but we presome it to be pecuwounded. A loss of about 4000 had been niary payment for all the losses incurred unadroitted in the battle of Smolensk. The der the Orders in Council. They leave us Rassians in their account make the French in less doubt as to the nature of the security joso atobnt to 20,000 men. After this affair, which must be given as the price of peace. the flag of the United States is herenfter to sonby, Mr. Whitbread, and Mr. Broughani, protect every person and every thing over has been as strong as that of Lord Liver. which it waves. No right of search, no ini. poul, Mr. Canning, and Mr. Stephen. All pressment of English seamen, no examina

are equally convinced of the vital importtion as to the contraband nature of the cargo ance of the question which now seems to be or its hostile character, is hereafter to be al. at issue ; and here, if ever, they will all agree lowed. The American merchantman on the bat high seas is to be as sacred as the altars of Toto certandum est corpore regni. old, which served to screen the criminal from

Hostilities have feebly commenced on the the hand of justice. The iniiination of such

part of America, by the advance of a body extravagant expectations on the part of the

of troope within the Canadian lines. The American Government, assuming it to es

details of their operations are somewhat ludi. press the mind of the Government, proves

crous. They vaunt their entrance into Caincontestably the inveterate hostility of that

nada, as if it had been achieved by the mind towards Great Britain, and the entire

most brilliant victories; and yet the facts coincidence of its views with those of Bona

turn out to be, even on their own shewing, parte. They now adopt his language, and

that all the losses incurred have been inurge his extravagant pretensions in regard to

curred by themselves, and that their army maritime rights, as the gage for which they has been in great peril of starvation. They are to antince a war, avowedly begun on have been several times repulsed in an attack grounds which have since been removed by on Fort Malden. On the other hand, Mithe concessions of Great Britain. If, then, chillimakinac has surrendered to our troops. we must have war with America, notwith. A number of captures continue to be made standing the revocation of those Orders in

at sea by the ships of both countries. An Council which had long been proclaimed by American sloop of war has been captured by Anverica, and by the uriends of America in the Shannon frigate; and an English sloop of this country, as the only ubistacle to the re- war is said to have been taken by the Ameturn of a state of perfect amity between the rican frigate Essex. A great many American iwo nations; if we must have war with her privateers have also been taken. We presolely in the defence of those maritime rights

sume, as soon as it is ascertained that the op which our very existence as an indepen. United States are not to be propitiated by dent power is allowed by all our political the sacrifice of the Orders in Council, that parties to depend; we shall at least have the

our Government will deem it incumbent on satislaction of thiuking that there will wot

them tu pursue a more vigorous system of be one dissenting voice in our senale as to warfare than they have hitherto thought it the justice on our part of such a contest. right to adopt. On this ground the language of Mr. Poni

GREAT BRITAIN. The only point in our domestic policy which by his judicious relative: “ Thou shalt proit is necessary for us to notice at present, is vide vul of all the people ABLE MEN, SUCK the expecter dissolution of Parliament. We AS FEAR GOD, NEN OF TRUTH, NATINO CObelieve that there is now litile doubt of ihe VETOUSN ESS"," except it be, that they should near approach of that event ; and in the also be men who have time to give to the disview of it, we cannot but feel anxious that all charge of their parliamentary duties. If the who bear the Christian name should acquit electors cannot every where find men who themselves on that occasion as becomes their exactly correspond to this standard, they sacred profession. We need not now enter should at least look for them, and prefer on the various obligations which belong to those who approach to it the most nearly. We the situation of British electors. We have assame, that all who bave any claim to the often adverted to them. At the present title of Christian, will strenuously set themmoment, however, it seems peculiarly incum- selves against every kind and degree of imbent on them to fix their choice on men of morality, whether it take the shape of inuprightness and independence ; on men who, temperance, or undue influence; of misreunbiassed by the warmth of political animo- presentation, or outrage ; and that, however sily, will consider only how they can best such things may have the sanction of the discharge their duty to God and to their world's ordinary practice, they will sheye coun:ry, in the exercise of their delegated themselves in this, as in other respects, not trust. Nothing can be added to the recom- to be of the world. We have often endea mendation which was given, on a similar oc- voured to expose to our readers the insidious casion, to the leader of God's cbosen people

* Exod. xviii. 21.

defeat on the 21st of July, from a body of down to the September, when the 171b French troops inferior in number. The Cor- Bulletin is dated at Ghjal, about half way tez had determined on bringing this General between Smulensk and Moscow, no baule of to trial.

any moment had taken place. The Russians The French appear to be making great continued their retreat to Moscow, destroy. efforts to retrieve their losses in Spain. Mas. ing the magaziues iu their way; the French sena is said to bave marched across the Py- advancing in pui suit. The Russians are said Jennees with 10,000 men, to reinforce Mar- to be preparing for a vigorous stand at Mos. mont's shattered army, and to resune the cow. Should any reverse overtake Benachief command; and a part of this army has parte at this point, he will be placed in very already been making advances as far as Val perilous circumstances indeed: winter will Jadulid. The troops employed in the siege bave coinmenced, with an iminense extent of of Cadiz will make a large addition to the hostile territory in his rear. forces under Soult and Drouet ; Josepli's corps Battles bave occurred in other parts

of will probably connect itself with Suchet, and Russia, in which both sides claim the victory. the garrisons in every part of Spain will be In one fought at Polotsk, the French geuenal, drained 10 swell the numbers of these dif- the Duke of Reggio, was severely wounded; ferent armies. We have, however, a strong and from the French not baring since ado confidence, that, with the blessing of Provi- vanced in that quarter, it may be presumed dence continued to our arms, we shall yet the Russians liad the advantage. The siege succeed in defeating this forruidable combi- of Riga has not yet commenced. nation of hostile means; though perhaps, The conduct of Sweden has bitherto spo after all, the qnestion, whether Spain will be peared dubious and vacillating. It is at finally freed from the yoke of Bonaparte, may length said to have been decided, at an turn as much on ihe result of the campaign interview between the Emperor Alexander in the plains of Muscovy, as on that in the and Bernadotte, at Abo, in Finland, at Peninsula.

which Lord Cathcart assisted, that Sweden WAR IN THE NORTH.

should take part in the war agaiost tie

French, and that a body of Swedish trong Since our last number went to press the will be forth witla landed in Germany. series of French Bulletins from the 13th to the 17th, inclasive, have been received in

SICILY. this country. The first of these announces The constitution of the government of this the capture of Smolensk, after a long and island, has undergone an entire change. A sanguinary contest, in which each side, with parliament assembled at Palermo on the the customary proneness to exaggeration, af- 20th July, which has adopted the constitsfects to have obtained great advantages tion of Great Britain for its general model

, over the other. The loss of men was proba- and has abolished the feudal laws and barobly equal, the ground having been well con- nial rights and monopolies. This favorable tested, and the Russians retiring without chauge has been owing principally to the me disorder. The fruits of victory, however, deration, good sense, and firmness of Lord were, without doubt, reaped by the French. William Bentinck, who is both our ambass They entered as conquerors into Smolensk, dor and commander in chief in that island. but not till the magazines, and indeed a great part of the town, had been destroyed.

UNITED STATES. On the day after the evacuation of Smolensk, The news of the repeal of the Orders in Bonaparte made a great effort to tarn one of Council had been received in America, bat the wings of the Russian arnis, as it was re- was not likely to produce those conciliatory tiring. His purpose, however, was frustrated, effects whicli were by some so cunsidently and a severe contest ensued, in which it is anticipated. The National Intelligeucer, the evident, from Bonaparte's own balletin, that organ of the Government, declares, that this nu material advantage was obtained by loin. repeal will not satisfy the just expectations of The Russians retired unbroken and without America. They must have indemnity ft losing a guo. The French general, Gudin, the past, and security for the future. What who commanded, was killed, and the bulletin is the nature of the indemnity they requirto admits a loss of 3200 men in killed and is not stated; but we presume it to be perten wounded. A loss of about 4000 had been niary payment for all the losses incurred *** admitted in the battle of Sinolensk. The der the Orders in Council. They lease Rossians in their account make the French in less doubt as to the nature of the security 1088 amount to 20,000 mer. After this affair, which must be given as the price of peritt

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