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the flag of the United States is hereafter to sonby, Mr. Whitbread, and Mr. Brougham, protect every person and every thing over has been as strong as that of Lord Liver. which it waves. No right of search, no im. poul, Mr. Canning, and Mr. Stephen. All pressment of English seamen, no examina- are equally convinced of the vital importtion as to the contraband nature of the cargo ance of the question which now seems to be or its hostile character, is hereafter to be al. at issue ; and here, if ever, they will all agree lowed. The American merchantman on the bat high seas is to be as sacred as the altars of Toto certandum est corpore regni. old, which served to screen the criminal from

Hostilities have feebly commenced on the the hand of justice. The inijination of such

part of America, by the advance of a body extravagant expectations on the part of the

of troop" within the Canadian lines. The Atverican Government, assuming it 10 -8.

details of their operations are somewhat ludi. press the mind of the Government, proves

crous. They vaunt their entrance into Caincuntestably the inveterate hostility of that

nada, as if it had been achieved by the miud towards Great Britain, and the entire

most brilliant victories; and yet the facts coincidence of its views with those of Bona

turn out to be, even on their own sbewing, parte. They now adopt his language, and

that all the losses incurred have been inurge his extravagant pretensions in regard to

curred by themselves, and that their army maritime rights, as the gage for which they has been in great peril of starvation. They are tu aurinde a war, avowedly begun on have been several times repulsed in an attack grounds which have since beeu removed by on Fort Malden. On the other hand, Mithe concessions of Great Britain. If, then, chilliroakinac has surrendered to our troups. we must have war with America, not with. A number of captures continue to be made standing the revocation of those Orders in

at sea by the ships of both countries. An Council which had long been proclaimed by American sloop of war has been captured by America, and by the criends of America in the Shannon frigate; and an English sloop of this country, as the only ubaincle to the re

war is said to have been taken by the Ameturn of a state of perfect awity belween the rican frigate Essex. A great many American two nations; if we must bave war with ber privateers have also been laken. We presolely in the defence of those maritime rights

sume, as soon as it is ascertained that the OD which our very existence as an indepen- United States are not to be propitialed by dent power is allowed by all our political the sacrifice of the Orders in Council, that parties to depend; we shall at least have the

our Government will deem it incumbent on satisfaction of thinking that there will uot them to pursue a more vigorous system of be one sissenting voice in our senate as to warfare than they have hitherto thought it the justice on our part of such a contest.

right to adopt. Oa ihis ground the language of Mr. Pon

GREAT BRITAIN. The only point in our domestic policy which by his judicious relative : “ Thou shalt proit is necessary for us to notice at present, is vide out of all the people ABLE MEN, SUCK the expected dissolution of Parliament. We AS FEAR GOD, MEN OF TRUTH, NATINO CObelieve that there is now little doubt of the VETOUSN ESS," except it be, that they should rear approach of that event; and in the also be men who have time to give to the disvies of it, we cannot but feel anxious that all charge of their parliamentary duties

. If the who bear the Christian name should acquit electors cannot every where find men who themselves on that occasion as becomes their exactly correspond to this standard, they sacred profession. We need not now entersbould at least look for them, and prefer en the various obligations which belong to those who approach to it the most nearly. We the situation of British electors. We have assame, that all who bave any claim to the often adverted to them. At the present title of Christian, will strenuously set themwoment, however, it seems peculiarly incum- selves against every kind and degree of ima bent on then to fix their choice on men of morality, whether it take the shape of inuprightness and independence ; on men who, temperance, or undue influence; of misteunbiassed by the warmth of political animo- presentation, or outrage ; and that

, however sity, will consider only how they can best such things may have the sanction of the disebarge their duty to God and to their world's ordinary practice, they will sber coun:ry, in the exercise of their delegated themselves in this, as in other respects, not trust. Nothing can be added to the recom- to be of the world. We have often endea mendation which was given, on a similar 06- voured to expose to our readers the insidious casion, to the leader of God's ebosen people

• Exod. xviii. 21.

pretensims of certain candidates for popular The measures, however, to which we have favour, who flaster but to mislead, and whose now a wore especial relereuce, are tbuse recorded profligacy agrees ill with their public which involve questions of bigh moral improfessions of purity; and we are desirous, portance ;--the introduction of Christianity on this important and critical occasion, to re- into our Indian dominions; the more general peat the warning: Those will prove but in- diffusion of Christian education, and a beller different national relormers, who neglect the provision for an efficient establishment of ao work of reformation at home. Besides, there tive and laborious ministers of religion, and is a much faires prospect of correcting what for the institution of adequate places of reliis amiss in the administration, by a temno gious worship, both in Eugland and Ireland; perate, conciliating, and loyal, yet firm and The mature and dispassionate consideration of immoveably uprighe conduci, ihan by inflam- the claims of our Catholic population ; and matory harangues, or by bitter and con- Jast, thouyb not least, the rectification of the terup'ubits treatment of the government. enormous abuses still existing in our West

For some tarber teniarks on the duties Iudian Colonies. Neither our time, no both of candida'es and of electors, we beg our space, will permit us to enlarge on these to refer our readers 10 our volume for 1806, topics. We would anxiously press ther, p. 651, and to many other preceding parts however, on the consideration of our readers, of our work. We will a' present confine ourselves to reminding them, that the next

believed to be practicable, and not for the parliament will not only have many arduous

purpose of exciting discontent or despunder duties to fulfi), arising out of the singular si

cy. But since we last touched on this set tuation of external peril and internal vitti- ject, the evil has most alarmingly increased. cally in which the nation is placed, but many The price of gold, which oogtit to be also which unavoid:bly connect themselves Si. 178. 104d. the oance, and which was ' ten with our best Christian feelings and ympa. 41. 128, is now 51. 10s. inaking an advance thies. Our enemies are, inderd, numerous

on the whole, as compared with our paper, of and powerful ; our financial embarrassments railier more than forty per cent. Silver has are great and increasing, and not likely, in our view, io admit of any very efficient reme- is now 6s. 94. tbe ounce, wtrich makes the

not advanced wiih the same rapidity; but it dy, without an entire change in the system of dollar piece equal to 58. 10d. We leave no our currency-a change also, whic!!, we adnit, intention of entering into any reasoning de it becomes every day more difficuit to effect". this point at present, otherwise we should say,

that it is inaccurate to call the difference We have forborne of late pressing on in the nominal value of gold and silver at the attention of our readers, our own un- advance in the price of these articles, ades changed opinions on the vital question of it is neither more nor less than a depeceitour currency; for certainly we decnn ii vital; tion in the value of the paper currency to because we were led to helieve that people that amount. Is it possible to conceal trom in general weré only to be convinced by ourselves this fact, that the weight of twenty facts, of the truth which we wished to in- guineas in gold bullion will boy as much of press opon them, viz. the growing deprecia- corn, or any other article, as twenty-nine tion of our paper currency : and if we were pounds in Bank notes will buy? anxious to impress this truth, it was with a * Sec on this subject our last rolane, view to an efficient remedy, which we also p. 428.

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS.

T. Y.; A FRIỂND TO FAIRn668; MONITOR ; and C. L.; Will be inserted.
We very readily comply with Mr. WHYTE's request to be allowed to publish the paper

Self-examination, which appeared in our Number for July last.
BerlBY; A FRIEND TO THE BIBLE Society; C. L.; MARY; M—R.; SUSTICECOMES :

X. Y.; are under consideration. It is with great regret that we have been obliged to postpone the insertion of many interest ing articles of Religious Intelligence, particularly in regard to the institution of Auris liary Bible Societies in different parts of the kingdom, The length of the papers inserted in the early part of this Nomber, has also obliged us to exclude several communications for which we had hoped to find a place,

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Tothe Editor of the Christian Observer. where the Mahometans are allowed

the public exercise of their religion, wish to gratify your and where their houses are interreaders with some useful and mixed with those of the Christians. authentic information respecting the The population and strength of Ethiopic Christians, and seem to the empire may be inferred from the invite such communications, I here numerous armies they can raise in transmit to you what I have col- a short time, and at a small exlected from various books; being pense. They wage war with the part of a work I may hereafter pub- pagans annually, for the security of lisb, under the title of Ecclesiastical their own dominions, and to prevent Collections, chiefly Oriental, &c. the growing power of their ene

T. Y, mies, especially the kings of Galla

and Changalla. Their armies are Abassinia is a vast and exten- very large: one commanded by sive country, situated on the eastern the emperor in 1699, or 1700, .conconfines of Africa, where it is sisted of between four and five huobounded by the shore of the Red dred thousand men, Sea towards the Straits of Babel. In Europe, says my author, we mandel. Its extent is computed at have long been in an error, about a million of square miles. ' It con; the colour of the Ethiopians; because tains several principalities, subject we have confounded them with the w the same sovereign, of which Blacks of Nubia, who are their one, called Tigri, formerly the seat neighbours. Their natural colour is of the Elbiopian kings, compreheods brown, or rather that of the olive; twenty-four provinces: these princi- their stature is tall and majestic; they palities are, in reality, so many petty have good complexions, beautiful kingdoms. Abassinia, distinguishes eyes, well-set noses, thick lips, and Christian

from Pagan Ethiopia; white teeth : wbereas the inhabiwhich last is considerably more ex- Lants of Nubia, os Sennar, have flat tensive, and comprehends a number noses, thick lips, and very black of nations.

complexions. Gondar, or, as it is called, Gondar The language of the country is a a Catma; i. e. the City of the Sual; dialect of the Arabic, called by is the capital of the empire, some the Amharic tongue, and is and the chief residence of the probab?y no more than a corruption Emperor, and of the Abuna, or Pa- of the ancient Ethiopic, formerly triarch, who has a handsome palace «spoken in the kingdom of Tigri. copriguous to the patriarchal The Ethiopic is their learned lancherch. The city is three leagues guage; and herein all their ancient in circumference, and contains a writings are extant, and all books of hundred Christian churches.

prime pole in the religion and laws Emfras, next to Gondar, from of the empire continue so be writwhich it is distant a day's journey, ten, because they, esteem it a noble is one of the most considerable ci- longue. They pretend to have deties of Abassinia, and the only one sived it from Chaldea, and therefore COBIST. OBSERV. No. 130,

4L

pretensions of certain candidates for popular The measures, however, to which we have favour, who flatter but to mislead, and whose now a wore especial reference, are thuse recoriled profligacy agrees ill with their public which involve questions of high moral improfessions of parily; and we are desirous, portance ;--the introduction of Christianity on this important and critical occasion, to 1c- into our Indian dominions; the more general peat the warning: Those will prove but in. diffusion of Christian education, and a better different national reformers, who neglect the provision for an efficient establishinent of ac work of reformation at home. Besides, there live and laborious ministers of religion, and is a much fairer prospect of correcting what for the institution of adequate places of reliis amiss in the administration, by a tein- gious worship, both in England and Ireland; perate, conciliating, and loyal, get firm and The mature and dispassionale consideration of immuveably upright conduct, than by inflain- the claims of our Catholic population ; and matory barangues, or by bitter and con- Jast, though not least, the rectification of the temuplubits treatment of the government. enormous abuses still existing in our West

For some farther remarks on the duties Indian Colonies. Neither our time, nor both of candida'es and of electors, we beg ou: space, will permit us to enlarge on these to refer our readers to our volume for 1806, topics. We would anxiously press them, p. 651, and tv many other preceding parts however, on the consideration of our readers, of our work. We will a' present confine ourselves to reminding them, that the next

believed to be practicable, and not for the parliament will not only have many arduous

purpose of exciting discontent or desponden duties to fulfil, arising out of the singular si- cy. But since we last touched on this subtuation of exterual peril and internal witti- ject, the evil has most alarmingly increased. cally in which the nation is placed, but many The price of gold; which ought to be also which unavoid:bly connect themselves Si. 1 18. 1044. The ounce, and which was hen with our best Christian feelings and impa- 41.128, is now 51. 10s. making an advance thies. Our enemies are, inderd, numerous and powerful; our financial embarrassments ratlser more than torty per cent. Silver has

on the whole, as compared with our paper, of áre great and increasing, and not likely, in not advanced wiili the same rapidity ; but it our view, to admit of any very efficient reme- is now 6s. 94, tbe ounce, which makes the dy, without an entire change in the system of dollar piece equal to 58. 10d. We have no our currency-a change also, whiel, we adnuit, intention of entering into any reasoning on it becomes every day more difficuit to effect*. this point at present, otlierwise we should say,

that it is inaccurate to call the difference We have forborne of late pressing on in the nominal value of gold and silver an the attention of our readers, our own un- advance in the price of these articles, when changed opinions on the vital question of it is neither more not less than a deprecisour currency; for certainly we deem is vital; tion in the value of the paper currency to because we were led to believe that people that amount. Is it possible to conceal from in general were only to be convinced by ourselves this fact, that the weight of twenty facts, of the truth which we wished to in- guineas in gold bullion will buy as much of press opon them, viz. the growing deprecia- corn, or any other article, as twenty-nine tion of our paper currency : and if we were pounds in Bank notes will buy? anxious to impress this truth, it was with a * See on this subject our last volame, view to an efficient remedy, which we also p. 428.

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS.

T. Y.; A FRIEND TO FAIRNE68 ; MONITOR; and C. L.; will be inserted.
We very readily comply with Mr. Whyte's request to be allowed to publish the paper on

Self-txamination, which appeared in our Number for July last.
Beiler; A FRIEND TO THE BIBLE SOCIETY; C. L.; MARY; M—R.; SUByICECOMES ;

X. Y.; are under consideration. It is with great regret that we have been obliged to postpone the insertion of many interest & ing articles of Religious Intelligence, particularly in regard to the institucion of Auti. : liary Bible Societies in different parts of the kingdom. The length of the papers inserted

in the early part of this Number, has also obliged us to exclude several communications . for which we had hoped to find a place,

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To the Editor of the Christian Obserder.

where the Mahometans are allowed

the public exercise of their religion, S

readers with some useful and mixed with those of the Christians. authentic information respecting the The population and strength of Ethiopic Christians, and seem to the empire may be inferred from the invite such communications, I here numerous armies they can raise in transmit to you what I have col- a short time, and at a small exlected from various books; being pense. They wage war with the part of a work I may hereafter pub- pagans annually, for the security of lish, under the title of Ecclesiastical their own dominions, and to prevent Collections, chiefly Oriental, &c. the growing power of their ene

T. Y. mies, especially the kings of Galla

and Changalla. Their armies are Abassinia is a vast and exten- very large: one commanded by sive country, situated on the eastern lhe emperor in 1699, or 1700, .con, confines of Africa, where it is sisted of between four and five bunbounded by the shore of the Red dred thousand men. Sea towards the Straits of Babel- In Europe, says my author, we mandel. Its extent is computed at have long been in an error about a million of square miles. ' It conthe colour of the Ethiopians; because tains several principalities, subject we have confounded ihem with the 10 the same sovereign, of which Blacks of Nubia, who are their one, called Tigri, formerly the seat neighbours. Their natural colour is of the Ethiopian kings, compreheods brown, or rather that of the olive;

twenty-four provinces: these princi- their stature is tall and majestic; they palities are, in reality, so many petty have good complexions, beautiful kingdoms. Abassinia, distinguishes eyes, well-set noses, thick lips, and Christian from Pagan Ethiopia; white teeth : wbereas the inhabiwhich last is considerably more ex- tants of Nubia, or Sennar, have flat tensive, and comprehends a number noses, thick lips, and very black of nations.

complexions. Gondar, or, as it is called, Gondar The language of the country is a a Catma; i. e the City of the Seal; dialect of the Arabic, called by is the capital of the empire, some the Amharic tongue, and is and the chief residence of the probably no more than a corruption Emperor, and of the Abuna, or Pa- of the ancient Ethiopic, formerly triarch, who has a handsome palace spoken in the kingdom of Tigri. contiguous to the patriarchal The Ethiopic is their learned lanchurch. The city is three leagues guage; and herein all their ancient in circumference, and contains a writings are extant, and all books of "hundred Christian churches. prime pole in the religion and laws

Emfras, next to Gondar, from of the empire continue to be writwhich it is distant a day's journey, ten, ibecause they esteem it a noble is one of the most considerable ci- tongue. They pretend to have deties of Abassinia, and the only one sived it from Chaldea, and therefore

CARWT. OBSERV. No. 130,

4 L

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