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CONTENTS OF VOL. VI.

FRANCE FROM THE CAPTURE OF CONSTANTINE IN OCTOBER 1837, TO THE TREATY

REGULATING THE AFFAIRS OF THE EAST IN JULY 1841

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1. Universal joy in France at the storming of Constantine,

2. Fresh creation of peers,

ib.

3. M. Arago as a political leader,

2

4. His failings,

3

5. MM. L. Blanc, Dupont de l'Eure, and Lafitte,

4

6. Opening of the Chambers,

5

7. Rapid growth of railway companies,

6

8. M. Arago's Report on the railway lines,

7

9. General prosperity of the country,

8

10. Fever of speculation in France,

9

11. General frauds committed on the public,

10

12. Influence of the passion for gain on literature and the press,

11

13. Change it induced in the system of government,

12

14. Scandalous increase of corruption in France,

13

15. Position of Count Molé, and his attention to the Court,

14

16. Statistics of the army, and social concerns,

ib.

17. Last illness and death of Talleyrand,

16

18. His character,

17

19. Conspiracy of Hubert,

18

20. Louis Napoleon is obliged to leave Switzerland and come to England, . 20

21. Evacuation of Ancona,

21

22. Affairs of Belgium,

22

23. Military preparations, and wild views of the Belgian republicans,

23

24. Views of the English Cabinet on the subject,

24

25. Obstinacy of the Belgians, and military preparations of France and Prussia, 25

26. Failure of the Bank of Brussels, and settlement of the question,

26

27. Differences of France and Mexico,

28

28. Reflections on the attack of land defences by sea forces,

29

29. Instances on each side,

30

30. Instances from the present war,

ib.

31. Probable conclusion on the subject,

31

32. Coalition against, and dissolution of the Chambers,

32

VOL. VI.

51.

.

71. Marriage of the Duke de Nemours and the Princess of Saxe-Coburg Gotha, ib.
72. Dotation of the Duke de Nemours thrown out by the Chamber,
78. Project for removing the bones of Napoleon to Paris,
79. Inauguration of a pillar to Insurrection on the Place of the Bastile,
85. Attempt of Darmès to assassinate the King,
86. Disinterment of the bones of Napoleon, .
87. Reinterment of Napoleon in the Church of the Invalides,
88. Political manifestations on the occasion,
89. Threatening state of affairs in the East,
90. M. Guizot's account of the British policy in the East,
93. Memorandum of the Allied Powers,

&

33. Ministerial crisis, and attempt to form a Liberal Administration,

34. Vain attempts to form a Ministry,

35. La Société des Familles. Its organisation,

36. Which is changed into the Société des Saisons,

37. Insurrection of May 12, which is suppressed,

38. Second Ministry of Marshal Soult,

39. Character of M. Villemain,

40. State of parties after this change,

41. Trial of Barbès and the conspirators,

42. Conviction and sentences of the accused,

43. Views of Barbès and his associates in this conspiracy,

44. Progress of the Napoleon party, .

45. Increased strength of the Government,

46. Debate on the affairs of the East,

47-50. Lamartine's speech on the subject,

51-53. Argument of M. Villemain on the other side,

54. Marshal Soult's measures in the East,

55-56. M. Jouffroy's exposition of the Government system,

57. Affairs of Africa after the storm of Constantine, .

58. Their threatening aspect,

59. Commencement of the insurrection,

60. Vigorous defensive measures, and successes of the French,

61. Death of the Princess Maria of Würtemberg,

62. Creation of twenty peers,

63. Commencement of agitation for a lowering of the suffrage,

64. View of the Liberals as to the government of the executive,

65. Commencement of the session of 1840; the King's speech,

66-69. Speech of M. Thiers on the Eastern question,

70. Reflections on this debate,

73. M. Thiers' second Ministry,

74. First division supports the Ministry,

75. Early measures of the Ministry,

76. State of the public press,

77. Bill regarding infant labour,

80. Expedition of Louis Napoleon to Boulogne,

81-82. Failure of the enterprise,

83. His trial, and sentence of imprisonment,

84. His life in prison, and its beneficial results,

91. M. Thiers' answer,

92. Treaty of July 15, 1840, .

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DOMESTIC HISTORY OF ENGLAND, FROM THE RETURN OF THE WEIGS TO POWER IN

12-14. Argument of the Conservatives on the other side,

20. Defeat of motions regarding the currency, agricultural distress, and

21. The budget, and extinction of the surplus,

22. Mr O'Connell's crusade against the House of Lords,

23. Spread of these extreme opinions among the operatives in towns, and

24. Great apprehensions of the Ministerialists,

25. Great, though gradual, creation of Whig peers,

8

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24. King's reception of the Address as amended,

134

25. Exasperation of the Whigs at Sir R. Peel not resigning,

135

26. Motion for repeal of the malt-tax lost,

ib.

27. Great diminution in the consumption of beer,

137

28. Debate on Lord Londonderry's appointment as ambassador at St Peters-

burg,

138

29. Lord Londonderry's declinature of the office,

139

30. Sir Robert Peel's remedial measures,

140

31. The Whigs attack Government on the Irish Church question,

141

32. Lord John Russell's motion regarding the Irish Church,

142

33-37. Argument in favour of the motion,

142-145

38-42. Answer of the Ministry,

146-149

43. Division on the question, and resignation of Sir R. Peel,

150

44. New Ministry, and Melbourne its head,

151

45. Importance of this short Administration of Sir R. Peel,

15

46. Which averted the danger of revolution in Great Britain,

47. Effect of this in restoring the House of Lords to their functions,

48. Its pernicious effects upon Ireland,

49. Liberal measures forced upon Government by the change,

50. Great rise of Sir R. Peel in general estimation from this short Adminis

tration,

51. Merits of Lord J. Russell's proposal regarding the Irish Church,

CHAPTER XXXVI.

APRIL 1835, TO THE ACCESSION OF QUEEN VICTORIA IN

1. Lord Melbourne's announcement of his principles of government,
2. Character of Lord Melbourne by Sydney Smith,
3. Defeats of Ministers at the new elections,
4. Ministerial measures of reform,
5. Scotch Burgh Reform Bill,
6. Government report on the English corporations,
7. Heads of the ministerial Corporate Reform Bill,
8. General features of the bill in a political point of view,
9.11. Argument in support of the bill,

15. Fate of the bill in the Commons and Peers,

16. Reflections on this change,

17. Its great defect,

18. True principle on the subject,
19. Ministerial bill for Church reform,

ceedings regarding Orange lodges,

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178

183

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6. State of the West Indies,

188

27. Commencement of the troubles in Canada,

189

28. Demands of the discontented in both the provinces,

190

pening of the Assembly, and demands of the Opposition,

191

30. Opening of Parliament, and King's speech,

193

31. The state of the Irish corporations,

ib.

32. Government plan, and abuses complained of,

194

33. Argument in support of the bill,

196

34-37. Argument against the bill,

196-199

38. The bill is carried in the Commons,

200

39. The bill is essentially altered in the Lords, and finally rejected in the

Commons,

201

40. Irish Church Bill again passed in the Commons, and thrown out in the -

Lords,

41. Perils of this state of collision between the two Houses,

202

42. Increased agitation against the House of Lords, .

203

43. Effects of this agitation in Ireland,

204

44. Re-establishment of the Catholic Association,

206

45. Report recommending a Poor Law in Ireland,

207

46. History of the measure, and causes of its long abeyance,

ib.

47. Mr Nicholl's Report, and its awful revelations,

209

48. English Tithe Bill, and for registration of births, deaths, and marriages, 210

49. Agricultural Distress Committee, and refusal of currency investigation, 212

50. The Budget,

213

51. Deplorable weakness of the navy and army,

ib.

52. Lord Dudley Stuart's remarkable speech on the Russian power in the

East,

215

53. Increasing discontents of Canada, and settlement of the upper province, 216

54. Violent proceedings of the Assembly in Lower Canada,

217

55. Public meetings on both sides. The banquets in London and Leeds, 218

56. The Glasgow banquet to Sir R. Peel,

219

57. Opening of Parliament,

221

58. Irish Corporations Bill,

ib.

59. Poor-law Bill, which passes without a division,

223

60. Statistics of Irish destitution,

224

61. Great difference in the statistics of the two countries of Great Britain

and Ireland,

225

62. Final establishment of poor-laws there,

ib.

63. Reflections on this subject,

227

228

64. Ministerial plan for abolishing church-rates,

229

65. Lord Normanby's administration in Ireland,

66. Compromise between the two houses on the appropriation clause and

231

Municipal Bill,

232

67. Which is carried into effect,

233

68. Settlement of the Irish Municipal Bill,

234

69. Fate of the bill in 1839 and 1840,

235

70. Affair of the Vixen. Its origin, .

ib.

71. Capture of the vessel by the Russians,

72. Proceedings in Parliament on the subject, which is dropped by Govern-

237

ment,

238

73. Death of the King,

.

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