The Slang Dictionary: Or, The Vulgar Words, Street Phrases, and "fast" Expressions of High and Low Society : Many with Their Etymology, and a Few with Their History Traced

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J. Camden Hotten, 1865 - 305 sider
 

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Innhold

I
xxv
II
25
III
31
IV
63
VI
67
VII
90
VIII
114
IX
126
XVII
173
XVIII
183
XIX
188
XX
191
XXI
206
XXII
208
XXIII
215
XXIV
250

X
128
XI
137
XII
147
XIII
157
XIV
158
XV
162
XVI
166
XXV
262
XXVI
263
XXVII
264
XXVIII
270
XXIX
271
XXX
272

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Populære avsnitt

Side xv - Immodest words admit of no defence; For want of decency is want of sense.
Side 2 - Cant' is, by some people, derived from one Andrew Cant, who, they say, was a presbyterian minister in. some illiterate part of Scotland, who by exercise and use had obtained the faculty, alias gift, of talking in the pulpit in such a dialect, that it is said he was understood by none but his own 'congregation, and not by all of them.
Side 74 - ... halls, &c. To this smutty regiment, who attended the progresses, and rode in the carts with the pots and kettles, which, with every other article of furniture, were then moved from palace to palace, the people, in derision, gave the name of black guards, a term since become sufficiently familiar, and never properly explained/' Gifford's notes on Jonsoris Works, vol.
Side 70 - It was the practice of stock-jobbers, in the year 1720, to enter into a contract for transferring South Sea stock at a future time for a certain price ; but he who contracted to sell, had frequently no stock to transfer, nor did he who bought intend to receive any in consequence of his bargain ; the seller was therefore called a bear, in allusion to the proverb, and the buyer a bull, perhaps only as a similar distinction.
Side xxv - Mayhew very pertinently remarks, " it would appear, that not only are all races divisible into wanderers and settlers, but that each civilized or settled tribe has generally some wandering horde intermingled with, and in a measure preying upon it.
Side 307 - Book of Dogs ; the Varieties of Dogs as they are found in OLD SCULPTURES, PICTURES, ENGRAVINGS, and BOOKS.
Side 292 - Bacchus and Venus ; or, a Select Collection of near Two Hundred of the most Witty and Diverting Songs and Catches in Love and Gallantry, with Songs in the Canting Dialect

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