Reliques of ancient English poetry: consisting of old heroic ballads, songs, and other pieces of our earlier poets, together with some few of later date

Forside
Printed by J. Nichols, for F. and C. Rivington, 1794
 

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A very famous collection that contributed largely to the fashion for balads and ultimately t the Romantic movement. It is a mixed bag, some genuinely early, some not, but important for its influence. Les hele vurderingen

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Side 204 - Thro' bogs, thro' brakes ; Or else, unseene, with them I go, All in the nicke To play some tricke And frolicke it, with ho, ho, ho ! Sometimes I meete them like a man, Sometimes an ox, sometimes a hound ; And to a horse I turn me can, To trip and trot about them round. But if to ride, My backe they stride, More swift than wind away I go ; Ore hedge and lands, Thro...
Side viii - So, on the contrary, an ordinary Song or Ballad that is the Delight of the common People, cannot fail to please all such Readers as are not unqualified for the Entertainment by their Affectation or Ignorance; and the Reason is plain, because the same Paintings of Nature which recommend it to the most ordinary Reader, will appear Beautiful to the most refined.
Side 205 - Twixt sleepe and wake, I do them take, And on the key-cold floor them throw : If out they cry, then forth I fly, And loudly laugh out, ho, ho, ho ! When...
Side 129 - Is there ony room at your head, Saunders? Is there ony room at your feet? Or ony room at your side. Saunders, Where fain, fain, I wad sleep?" "There's nae room at my head, Marg'ret, There's nae room at my feet; My bed it is fu' lowly now, Amang the hungry worms I sleep.
Side 144 - FORSAKEN 0 waly waly up the bank, And waly waly down the brae, And waly waly yon burn-side Where I and my Love wont to gae...
Side 333 - So shall the fairest face appear When youth and years are flown; Such is the robe that kings must wear When death has reft their crown.
Side 300 - Which made him bolder and bolder. He had long claws, and in his jaws Four and forty teeth of iron ; With a hide as tough as any buff, Which did him round environ.
Side 334 - Bethink thee, William, of thy fault, Thy pledge and broken oath: And give me back my maiden vow, And give me back my troth.
Side 177 - He pawned and mortgaged all his land Ere seven years came about, And now at length this wicked act Did by this means come out : The fellow that did take in hand These children for to kill, Was for a robbery judged to die ; Such was God's blessed will.
Side 123 - Deal on, deal on, my merry men all, Deal on your cake and your wine ; For whatever is dealt at her funeral to-day, Shall be dealt to-morrow at mine.

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