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The original has been faithfully rendered, and paraphrase altogether avoided. At the same time, the translators have endeavoured to adapt the book to the use of the English render. Some amount of rhythm in the structure of the sentence has been generally maintained ; and, when in the Latin the sound of the words is an echo to the sense (as so frequently happens in Virgil), an attempt has been made to produce the same result in English. The general introduction contains whatever is known of the poet's life, an estimate of his genius, an account of the principal editions and translations of his works, and a brief view of the influence he has had on modern poets ; special introductory essays are prefixėd to the Eclogues," " Georgics," and "Æneid.The text is divided into sections, each of which is headed by a concise analysis of the subject ; the Index contains references to all the characters and events of any importance. A more complete edition of Virgil in English it is scarcely possible to conceive than the scholarly work before us.”—GLOBE.

Wright.-Works by J. WRIGHT, M.A., late Head Master of

Sutton Coldfield School.

HELLENICA ; OR, A HISTORY OF GREECE IN GREEK, as

related by Diodorus and Thucydides; being a First Greek Reading Book, with explanatory Notes, Critical and Historical. Third Edition, with a Vocabulary. 12mo. 35. 6d.

In the last twenty chapters of this volume, Thucydides sketches the rise and progress of the Athenian Empire in so clear a style and in such simple language, that the editor has doubts whether any easier or more instructive passages can be selected for the use of the pupil who is commencing Greek. This book includes a chronological table of the events recorded. The GUARDIAN speaks of the work as a good plan well executed.

A HELP TO LATIN GRAMMAR; or, The Form and Use of Words

in Latin, with Progressive Exercises. Crown 8vo. 45. 6d.

This book is not intended as a rival to any of the excellent Grammars now in use ; but as a help to enable the beginner to understand them.

THE SEVEN KINGS OF ROME. An Easy Narrative, abridged

from the First Book of Livy by the omission of Difficult Passages; being a First Latin Reading Book, with Grammatical Notes. Fifth Edition. Fcap. 8vo. 35. With Vocabulary, 3s. 6d.

Wright-continued.

This work is intended to supply the pupil with an easy construing book, which may at the same time be made the vehicle for instructing him in the rules of grammar and principles of composition. The notes profess to teach what is commonly taught in grammars. It is conceived that the pupil will learn the rules of construction of the language much more easily from separate examples, which are pointed out to him in the course of his reading, and which he may himself set down in his note-book after some scheme of his own, than from a heap of quotations amassed for him by others. The Notes are abundant, explicit, and full of such grammatical and other information as boys require.—ATHENÆUM. " This is really," the MORNING POST says, what its title imports, and we believe that its general introduction into Grammar Schools would not only facilitate the progress of the boys beginning to learn Latin, but also relieve the Masters from a very considerable amount of irksome labour .... a really vaiuable addition to our school libraries.

FIRST LATIN STEPS; OR, AN INTRODUCTION BY A

SERIES OF EXAMPLES TO THE STUDY OF THE

LATIN LANGUAGE. Crown 8vo. 55. The following points in the plan of the work may be noted :-1. The pupil has to deal with only one construction at a time. 2. This construction is made clear to him by an accumulation of instances. 3. As all the constructions are classified as they occur, the construction in each sentence can be easily referred to its class. 4. As the author thinks the pupil ought to be thoroughly familiarized, by a repetition of instances, with a construction in a foreign language, before he attempts himself to render it in that language, the present volume contains only Latin sentences. 5. The author has added to the Rules on Prosody in the last chapter, a few familiar lines from Ovid's Fasti by way of illustration. In a brief Introduction the author states the rationale of the principal points of Latin Grammar. Copious Notes are appended, to which reference is made in the text. From the clear and rational method adopted in the arrangement of this elementary work, from the simple way in which the various rules are conveyed, and from the abundance of examples given, both teachers and pupils will find it a valuable help to the learning of Latin.

The original has been faithfully rendered, and paraphrase altogether avoided. At the same time, the translalors have endeavoured to adapt the book to the use of the English render. Some amount of rhythm in the structure of the sentence has been generally maintained; and, when in the Latin the sound of the words is an echo to the sense (as so frequently happens in Virgil), an attempt has been maile to produce the same result in English. The general introduction contains whatever is known of the poet's life, an estimate of his genius, an account of the principal editions and translations of his works, and a brief view of the influence he has had on modern poets ; special introductory essays are prefixed to the Eclogues," " Georgics," and "Æneid.The text is divided into sections, each of which is headed by a concise analysis of the subject; the Index contains references to all the characters and events of any importance. A more complete edition of Virgil in English it is scarcely possible to conceive than the scholarly work before us.—GLOBE.

Wright.-Works by J. WRIGHT, M.A., late Head Master of

Sutton Coldfield School.

HELLENICA ; OR, A HISTORY OF GREECE IN GREEK, as

related by Diodorus and Thucydides ; being a First Greek Reading Book, with explanatory Notes, Critical and Historical. Third Edition, with a Vocabulary. 12mo. 35. 6d.

In the last twenty chapters of this volume, Thucydides sketches the rise and progress of the Athenian Empire in so clear a style and in such simple language, that the editor has doubts whether any easier or more instructive passages can be selected for the use of the pupil who is commencing Greek. This book includes a chronological table of the events recorded. The GUARDIAN speaks of the work as a good plan well executed.

A HELP TO LATIN GRAMMAR; or, The Form and Use of Words

in Latin, with Progressive Exercises. Crown 8vo. 45. 6d.

This book is not intended as a rival to any of the excellent Grammars now in use ; but as a help to enable the beginner to understand them.

THE SEVEN KINGS OF ROME. An Easy Narrative, abridged

from the First Book of Livy by the omission of Difficult Passages; being a First Latin Reading Book, with Grammatical Notes. Fifth Edition. Fcap. 8vo. 35. With Vocabulary, 3s. 6d.

Wright-continued.

This work is intended to supply the pupil with an easy construing book, which may at the same time be made the vehicle for instructing him in the rules of grammar and principles of composition. The notes profess to teach what is commonly taught in grammars. It is conceived that the pupil will learn the rules of construction of the language much more easily from separate examples, which are pointed out to him in the course of his reading, and which he may himself set down in his note-book after some scheme of his own, than from a heap of quotations amassed for him by others. The Notes are abundant, explicit, and full of such grammatical and other information as boys require.—ATHENÆUM. " This is really," the MORNING Post says, what its title imports, and we believe that its general introduction into Grammar Schools would not only facilitate the progress of the boys beginning to learn Latin, but also relieve the Masters from a very considerable amount of irksome labour .... a really vaiuable addition to our school libraries.FIRST LATIN STEPS; OR, AN INTRODUCTION BY A

SERIES OF EXAMPLES TO THE STUDY OF THE

LATIN LANGUAGE. Crown 8vo. 55. The following points in the plan of the work may be noted :-1. The pupil has to deal with only one construction at a time. 2. This construction is made clear to him by an accumulation of instances. 3. As all the constructions are classified as they occur, the construction in each sentence can be easily referred to its class. 4. As the author thinks the pupil ought to be thoroughly familiarized, by a repetition of instances, with a construction in a foreign language, before he attempts himself to render it in that language, the present volume contains only Latin sentences. 5. The author has added to the Rules on Prosody in the last chapter, a few familiar lines from Ovid's Fasti by way of illustration. In a brief Introduction the author states the rationale of the principal points of Latin Grammar. Copious Notes are appended, to which reference is made in the text. From the clear and rational method adopted in the arrangement of this elementary work, from the simple way in which the various rules are conveyed, and from the abundance of examples given, both teachers and pupils will find it a valuable help to the learning of Latin.

CLASSIC VERSIONS OF ENGLISH EOOKS

AND LATIN HYMNS.

The following works are, as the heading indicates, classic renderings of English Books. For scholars, and particularly for writers of Latin Verse, the series has a special value. The Hymni Ecclesiæ are here inserted, as partly falling under the same class.

Church (A. J., A.M.)-HORÆ TENNYSONIANÆ, sive

Eclogae e Tennysono. Latine redditæ. Cura A. J. CHURCH,

A.M. Extra fcap. 8vo. 6s. Latin versions of Selections from Tennyson. Among the authors are the Editor, the late Professor Conington, Professor Seeley, Dr. Hessey, Mr. Kebbel, and other gentlemen.

Latham.-SERTUM SHAKSPERIANUM, Subnexis aliquot

aliunde excerptis floribus. Latine reddidit Rev. H. LATHAM, M.A.

Extra fcap. 8vo. 55. Besides versions of Shakespeare this volume contains, among other pieces, Gray's Elegy,Campbell's Hohenlinden,Wolfe's Burial of Sir John Moore," and selections from Cowper and George Herbert.

Lyttelton.—THE COMUS OF MILTON, rendered into Greek

Verse. By LORD LYTTELTON. Extra fcap. 8vo. 55. THE SAMSON AGONISTES OF MILTON, rendered into Greek

Verse. By LORD LYTTELTON. Extra fcap. 8vo. 6s. 6d.

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