The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, Volum 1

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Side 76 - He was a man of wonderful gravity and wisdom ; and understood not only the whole science and mystery of the law...
Side 277 - ... that they must now be of another temper than they were the last Parliament ; that they must not only sweep the house clean below, but must pull down all the cobwebs which hung in the top and corners, that they might not breed dust and so make a foul house hereafter; that they had now an opportunity to make their country happy, by removing all grievances and pulling up the causes of them by the roots, if all men would do their duties...
Side 412 - God, promise, vow and protest to maintain and defend, as far as lawfully I may, with my Life, Power and Estate the true Reformed Protestant Religion, expressed in the Doctrine of the Church of England, against all Popery and Popish Innovations within this Realm, contrary to the same Doctrine...
Side 319 - MR. SPECTATOR, — My Lord Clarendon has observed, that few men have done more harm than those who have been thought to be able to do least; and there cannot be a greater error, than to believe a man, whom we see qualified with too mean parts to do good, to be therefore incapable of doing hurt. There is a supply of malice, ot pride, of industry, and even of folly, in the weakest, when he sets his heart upon it, that makes a strange progress in mischief.
Side 378 - It was true, we give law to hares and deer, " because they be beasts of chase; but it was never " accounted either cruelty, or foul play, to knock " foxes and wolves on the head as they can be found, " because they be beasts of prey.
Side 410 - I may, with my life, power, and estate, the true reformed protestant religion, expressed in the doctrine of the church of England, against all popery and popish innovations...
Side 245 - The earl of Strafford had for the space of almost six years entirely governed Ireland, where he had been compelled, upon reason of state, to exercise many acts of power; and had indulged some to his own appetite and passion, as in the cases of the lord chancellor, and the lord Mount-Norris...
Side 70 - The person replied, as he had done before, that he should never find rest till he should perform what he required, and therefore he were better to despatch it ; that the access to his son was known to be very easy, and that few men waited long for him ; and for the gaining him credit, he would tell him two or three particulars, which he charged him never to mention to any person living but to the duke himself, and he should no sooner hear them but he should believe all the rest he should say ; and...
Side 146 - Court; countenanced men of the greatest parts in learning, and disposed the clergy to a more solid course of study than they had been accustomed to ; and if he had lived would quickly have extinguished all that fire in England which had been kindled at Geneva...
Side 210 - Sir, I must know this young man better than you " can do : you have brought me low, that you may " raise him ; which I doubt you will live to repent ; " for he is a man of craft, subtilty, and falsehood, " and can love no man ; and if ever he finds it in " his power to do you mischief, he will be sure to do

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