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5. Lessons on the first principles of arithmetic, illustrated by the ballframe, &c. 6. First lessons on language. 7. Easy lessons on manufactures.

RELIGIOUS AND MORAL.

A.-Class Division. Reading lessons in Daily Lesson Books, Nos. 1, 2, and Sequel to No. 2.

C.-Gallery Division. Scripture lessons daily.

Subjects. Scripture narratives, illustrating and enforcing Bible truths and moral duties, such as :

The goodness, wisdom, and power of God. Obedience to parents. Love to brothers and sisters. Kindness to animals. Speaking the truth. Honesty. By the above arrangement it will be seen that the method of instruction adopted combines collective teaching with that which is individual. It may very properly be termed the mixed method. The monitorial mode, as far as it is necessary, is retained, and the instruction imparted is both analytical and synthetical. The gallery is used at stated periods for communicating to the children that particular kind of instruction which can be best imparted by the teacher himself, and which does not require minute subdivision. Moral instruction or admonition is by this means communicated to fifty or sixty children at once with considerable effect. To facilitate the adoption of col. lective, in connexion with monitorial teaching, the books used in the schools contain lessons adapted to both methods.

Boys' Senior School.

INTELLECTUAL.

A.-Class Dirision. 1. Reading prose and poetry, with a rigid course of analysis and synthesis from Daily Lesson Books, No3. 3 and 4, and Dr. Allen's Selections of Poetry.

2. Spelling and dictation,

3. Written and mental arithmetic, with lessons on the principles of arithmetic.

4. English grammar.
5. Geography.
6. English and general history.
7. Natural history and physiology.
8. Mechanics and machinery.
9. Natural philosophy and science of common things.

B.-Writing Division.
1. Writing in books.
2. Arithmetic, written and mental, from Crossley's Calculator.
3. Composition and dictation, both on slates and on paper.
4. Abstracts of gallery lessons.
5. Lineal and map drawing on slates.

C.--Gallery Division. Lessons on

1. The philosophy of health. 2. The elementary principles of political economy. 3. Objects and manufactures. 4. Physical and map geography. 5. English grammar, composition, and analysis. 6. Natural history and physiology of animals and plants. 7. Natural philosophy and the science of common things. 8. Singing from notes and in parts, with instruction in the principles of music.

D.— Drawing Room.
Drawing in its application to-

1. Models and objects.
2. Mechanics and machinery.
3. Architecture.
4. Maps and charts.
5. Natural history and the human figure.

RELIGIOUS AND MORAL,

A.-Class Division. 1. Bible reading and interrogation. 2. Repetition of portions of Scripture committed to memory.

C.-Gallery Division.
Scripture Lessons on-

1. Bible narratives.
2. Scripture miracles and parables.
3. Moral duties.
4. Attributes of God.

5. Bible emblems and illustrations. In all the lessons, it is designed that scriptural instruction should be brought practically to bear on the conscience,--and that all duty should be enforced on the principles of the Gospel, and from the Word of God.

The time-table, as well as much other interesting information concerning this part of the institution, has already been recorded in official documents.

The girls' model school, in common with the whole female department of the institution, enjoys the experienced and judicious superintendence of Mrs. Macrae; whilst the details of its management are happily and successfully carried out by Miss Tomlinson. Like the boys school, it is organized on the tripartite system, and the principal room is occupied by nine distinct sections of children. The following time-table will give some idea of the working of this system in girls' schools :

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Mental arithmetic
Practical arithmetic
Natural history
Natural history
Reading
Practical arithmetic
Writing
English grammar
Reading
Reading
Practical arithmetic
Tables

10.30 to 11.15

Domestic economy.
Dictation.
Object lessons.
Sacred geography.
Reading.
Dictation (easy words).
Dictation

Highest
Sacred geography singing
Reading

class.
Singing and drilling for the

whole school.

99

Modern geography, English grammar Physical geography
Practical arithmetic Writing

Writing
Object lesson

Geography (easy les. Spelling

sons),
English history Modern geography

English grammar
Reading
Reading

Reading
Practical arithmetic
Writing

Writing
Practical arithmetic Writing

Practical arithmetic
English history Modern geography

Natural history
Reading
Reading

Reading
Reading

Lowest
Reading

Reading
Dictation
Practical arithmetic

singing
Writing

class.
Spelling
Tables

Spelling
Rearling Scripture and Practical arithmetic Reading Scripture

interrogation.
Writing

Scripture reading and Practical arithmetic

interrogation.
Reading Scripture and

Reading Scripture
interrogation.
Needlework
Needlework

Needlework
Scripture read to the

whole school, then Same as Monday Same as Monday
dismissed

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Reading Scripture
Dictation
Reading Scripture
Needlework
Same as Monday

Reading Scripture and in

terrogation.
Writing.
Reading Scripture and in-

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Needlework.
Same as Monday.

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D, E, F
G, H, I

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D, E, F
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D, E, F
G, H, I
1, B, C
D, E, F
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I have had ample opportunities of testing the value of the work done in the model schools for both sexes, and I do not hesitate to state my opinion that they are in a condition of the highest efficiency attainable under the circumstances of the children by whom they are attended. The enlightened care and liberal expenditure bestowed upon them do the greatest honour to the society by which they are supported, and constitute one of the best claims of that society to the success which has attended its efforts in aid of the

progress

of popular education. But, whilst I cheerfully bear witness to the excellence of that which has been done, I find it impossible to forbear remarking upon that which remains undone.

This institution is in a peculiar position. It is the only normal school engaged in preparing teachers expressly for schools conducted on the principles of the British and Foreign School Society, and therefore it incurs a species of obligation to train them for every kind of work likely to be required of them. Among diocesan training schools, which are numerous, and conducted generally upon one system, there may well be a division of labour; and, whilst one trains teachers for boys' schools alone, another may employ its machinery exclusively for girls, a third for infants. But, if the Borongh Road Normal School omit any department of the teacher's work, there is no other establishment ready to supply the deficiency in a manner exactly suited to the requirements of the case, and the cause of combined education must be the loser. I feel bound, therefore, to express my entire concurrence in the opinion of Mr. Morell that the absence of an infant school is a decided defect in this institution.

I concur equally, however, in the hope that time and progress may soon avail to supply this deficiency. The special encouragement given to the training of infant teachers by your Lordships' Minute of 29 April 1854, the multiplication of infant schools throughout the country, and the necessity of having a certificated or registered teacher for every school which proposes to claim its fair share of the education grant, all concur in rendering it impossible that the authorities of this institution should much longer fail to recognize the pressing nature of the want.

I will venture to notice one other feature of this establishment, in regard to which it appears to me that some modifications of existing arrangements might advantageously be introduced. It is well known that this is not an institution of recent, date, established for the mere purpose of giving effect to the measures taken by Government, since 1816, for the extension and improvement of popular education; that its operations are of a much wider scope and older date ; and that its

a

co-operation with the Committee of Council on Education is confined to one section of its work. Of the 341 students who attended its classes in the year ended on the 1st of April last only 116 sought to obtain certificates of merit. The remainder attended for purposes not immediately connected with your Lordships' adininistration. The following classification of persons eligible for admission will illustrate the composition of the latter body :

Class A.-Young men desirous of becoming teachers, who wish to be introduced to a school by the Committee, and are prepared to remain in the institution twelve months or upwards. Persons in this class (unless conscientiously objecting) will be expected to compete for a certificate of merit at the annual examination of the students by Her Majesty's Inspector of Schools.

Class B.-Young men desirous of becoming teachers, who wish to be introduced to a school by the Committee, but are unable to remain longer than six months.

Class C.- Teachers elected to schools, or already conducting them, but desirous of attending, for some limited period, any of the classes, with a view to farther improvement.

Class D.-Missionaries or other persons procceding abroad with a view to the promotion of education in foreign parts. With respect to those who enter under Classes C. and D., I

I have no suggestion to offer. It would not generally be necessary that such persons should be accommodated with board and ludging on the premises, or that a special course of lectures should be provided for them. On the one hand, they need not interfere materially with the settled course of the regular students; and, on the other hand, it is obvious that they may obtain much valuable information by attending and observing such portions of the work as may be deemed most advisable for them.

But with Class B. it is different. They must reside upon the premises like annual students, and be provided with a distinct course of instruction. This, however, is merely an inconvenience. The serious objection to their admission is that the inconvenience is incurred, and the powers of the teachers taxed, for an object which is not worth attaining. In these days it is no longer necessary to argue that six months' training is insufficient to form a teacher, or that a teacher who enters upon school duties with such limited experience bas but little chance of success in the competition to which he will be exposed. He may be able to conduct a small school with moderate success, but in the majority of cases he will continue to be the teacher of a small school, and the receiver of a small salary, to the end of his career.

Far hetter for his own interests would it be to say to him, when be offers himself for the profession, “ We are ready to give you a thorough training, and to make you an efficient teacher, if you are capable of becoming one ; but we will have nothing

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