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tion and kindness of the distinguished personages who visited

St. Martin's Hall. School rate. In former reports I have alluded to the burden that the

maintenance of schools imposes on the clergy, and to the possible necessity of providing some means other than mere voluntary contributions for their future support. I receive

many letters from the clergy on the subject, to which I now Archdeacon refer chiefly because the Venerable Archdeacon Ormerod, Ormerod's charge. than whom no one is a inore zealous educationist, or has

a better acquaintance with the facts relating to schools in Norfolk and Suffolk, has been so good as to lend to me bis unpublished charge, delivered to the clergy of bis archdeaconry, and received by them with approbation. He says,

“ To dwell on the difficulties of maintaining a school would be mere waste of time--here it would be doubly so, the auditory being mainly composed of the witnesses to the fact. But long and careful consideration of the case would seem to lead to the conclusion that the urgent necessity of making such provision can only be met by rate or assessment. From voluntary efforts no great additional resources can be expected. So far as the clerical support of parochial schools is concerned, in the great majority of cases, the means of particular pastors may be considered as permanently taxed to the utmost, by conscientious and benevolent obligations in support of particular schools. May all good results attend on what has been already done—their promoters desire no better reward. But it can hardly be expected that, in so vital a question as is that of education, the welfare of so many should be left in dependence on the means, inclination, or ability of individuals or localities. The most effective, perhaps the only, means of meeting the difficulty would appear to be in a rate or assessment.”

The archdeacon then goes on to point out how difficulties which might be raised could be met or overcome-or even never actually arise, and, with unusual power, he answers all objections. I bring this matter forward chiefly to show the progress which this opinion is making in the district. You are aware that it has been my own opinion, from the first year of my inspection, that some measure for relieving the clergy from the burden of national education would sooner or later be called for ; and many are of opinion that, when such measure is passed, it should be accompanied by a clause to make education compulsory

I have the honor to be, &c.

M. MITCHELL. To the Right Honorable

The Lords of the Committee of Council on Education.

SUMMARIES OF TABULATED REPORTS ON SCHOOLS INSPECTED BY

Rev. M. MITCHELL AND Rev. W. CAMPBELL.

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• The amount of accommodation in square feet, divided by 8, will give the number of children who can be properly accommodated. Calculations of area in school-rooms, as compared with

the average attendance of scholars, should be made upon this basis. + At the date of closing

this return. i These per-centages are confined to boys' and girls' schools, and do not include infants.

SUMMARY B.

Aggregate Annual Income, as stated by Managers, of 159 of the Schools

enumerated in Summary (A.)

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General Report, for the Year 1854, by Her Majesty's Inspector

of Schools, the Rev. J. J. BLANDFORD, B.A., on the Schools inspected by him in the Counties of Lincoln, Nottingham,

Derby, Leicester, Rutland, and Northampton. MY LORDS,

In presenting my report for the year commencing Appoint1 September 1853 and ending 31 August 1854, I must first Assistant express my thanks to your Lordships for the important aid Inspector. that I have received, in the discharge of my duties, through the Rev. E. P. Arnold, who was appointed Assistant Inspector for this district in April 1854. By means of his assistance, all the schools in Leicestershire and Derbyshire which have received grants have been visited, although a considerable number of the latter do not appear in my tabulated reports for this year, Next year I trust we shall be able conjointly to give an account of every school in my district which has invited, or is liable to, inspection, and so to present a fuller account of the progress of education in the East Midland district than I have had it in my power to give hitherto.

In 1847, when I first entered upon the discharge of my Increased duties, there were 217 schools under inspection in my district ; schools there are now 386. The following table shows the increase in each county :

under inspection,

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Consequently, there is now an increase of 169 schools, compared with the number under inspection in 1847. This addi.. tional number consists partly of newly-built schools, and of those which, having received assistance from the public funds towards the salaries of teachers, or the purchase of books and maps, have thus become liable to inspection. I have reason for believing that the managers of more schools will invite inspection, now that provision has been made for their being examined with regularity, there having been naturally a dislike to the inspection when it took place at long and uncertain intervals.

A new feature in the pecuniary assistance given from the Capitation public funds towards the support of schools, and which in the agricultural districts at least will become of more importance every year, is the operation of the Minute of 2 April 1853, by which additional pecuniary aid is conditionally offered to schools situated in these localities. The Minute in question is

grants.

6s. 58. 48.

38.

99

thus worded (vide p. 11, Minutes of Committee of Council on Education, 1853-4, Vol. I.) :

“ MINUTE as to grants for the support of schools in the agricultural districts and in unincorporated towns (not containing more than 5,000 inhabitants) in England and Wales.

ResolvedThat any school now admissible, or which shall hereafter be admitted, to grants under the minutes of August and December 1846, may receive a grant towards the expenses of the preceding year, at the rate per scholar set forth in this following table :No. of Scholars.

Boys' Schools.

Girls' Schools.
Under 50
Above 50 but under 100

100
“ Provided that the rate shall not diminish on account of any increase in
the number of scholars, until the increase is such as to make the reduced
rate for the higher number balance the unreduced rate for the smaller
number, e.g., 100 scholars at 5s. per scholar is equal to 25l., but 101 scholars
at 4s. is equal to 201. 4s.; th sum of 251. therefore is to be continued until
the number of scholars reaches 126, which, at 4s. per scholar, is equal to
251. 4s., and so on to other quantities.

“ Provided that no such grant shall be claimable in respect of any year preceding the date at which the visit of one of Her Majesty's Inspectors of Schools shall, according to the regulations now in force, be due to the school in question."

There then follow the conditions on which such assistance is offered. The number of schools that from January 1854 to 31 August 1854, have availed themselves of this Minute

appears in the following table :List of Schools in Counties of LINCOLN, NOTTINGHAM, DERBY, and LEICESTER, which have

received CAPITATION GRANTS; with Amount of Grant; Number of Children on whom such Grant has been claimed ; and average attendance; from 1 January 1854 to 31 August 1854.

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