The Iliad of Homer, tr. by A. Pope

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Side 82 - No wonder, such celestial charms For nine long years have set the world in arms! What winning graces! what majestic mien! She moves a Goddess, and she looks a Queen. Yet hence, oh Heav'n! convey that fatal face, And from destruction save the Trojan race.
Side 5 - Homer; and whatever commendations have been allowed them on this head are by no means for their invention in having enlarged his circle but for their judgment in having contracted it. For when the mode of learning changed in...
Side 309 - In this was every art, and every charm, To win the wisest, and the coldest warm: Fond love, the gentle vow, the gay desire, The kind deceit, the still-reviving fire, Persuasive speech, and more persuasive sighs, Silence that spoke, and eloquence of eyes.
Side 147 - Here, as the queen revolved with careful eyes The various textures and the various dyes, She chose a veil that shone superior far, And glow'd refulgent as the morning star. Herself with this the long procession leads ; The train majestically slow proceeds. Soon as to Ilion's topmost tower they come, And awful reach the high Palladian dome, • Antenor's consort, fair Theano, waits As Pallas' priestess, and unbars the gates.
Side 83 - Though great Atrides overtops his head. Nor yet appear his care and conduct small; From rank to rank he moves, and orders all. The stately ram thus measures o'er the ground, And, master of the flock, surveys them round." Then Helen thus: "Whom your discerning eyes Have singled out, is Ithacus the wise; A barren island boasts his glorious birth; His fame for wisdom fills the spacious earth.
Side 97 - The day shall come, that great avenging day, Which Troy's proud glories in the dust shall lay; When Priam's powers and Priam's self shall fall, And one prodigious ruin swallow all.
Side 143 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away.
Side 20 - However, had he translated the whole work, I would no more have attempted Homer after him than Virgil, his version of whom (notwithstanding some human errors) is the most noble and spirited translation I know in any language.
Side 219 - Each. single Greek, in this conclusive strife, Stands on the sharpest edge of death or life': Yet if my years thy kind regard engage, Employ thy youth as I employ my age ; Succeed to these my cares, and rouse the rest ; He serves me most, who serves his country best.
Side 421 - For Peleus breathes no more the vital air; Or drags a wretched life of age and care, But till the news of my sad fate invades His hastening soul, and sinks him to the shades.

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