History of the opera, Volum 1

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Side 10 - Boileau (Major-General JT) A New and Complete Set of Traverse Tables, showing the Differences of Latitude and the Departures to every Minute of the Quadrant and to Five Places of Decimals. Together with a Table of the lengths of each Degree of Latitude and corresponding Degree of Longitude from the Equator to the Poles ; with other Tables useful to the Surveyor and Engineer. Fourth Edition, thoroughly revised and corrected by the Author. Royal 8vo. 12s. London, 1876. Boulger (DC) History of China....
Side 9 - Thomson's Lunar and Horary Tables. For New and Concise Methods of Performing the Calculations necessary for ascertaining the Longitude by Lunar Observations, or Chronometers ; with directions for acquiring a knowledge of the Principal Fixed Stars and finding the Latitude of them.
Side 125 - Tasso. •But to return to the sparrows': there have been so many flights of them let loose in this opera, that it is feared the house will never get rid -of them ; and that •in other plays they may make their entrance in very wrong and improper scenes, so as to be seen flying in a lady's bed-chamber, or perching upon a king's throne i besides the inconveniences which the heads of the audience may sometimes suffer from them.
Side 5 - History of Chess, From the time of the Early Invention of the Game in India, till the period of its establishment in Western and Central Europe.
Side 123 - Opera. As I was walking in the Streets about a Fortnight ago, I saw an ordinary Fellow carrying a Cage full of little Birds upon his Shoulder; and as I was wondering with...
Side 176 - ... pounds sterling. The stage was built over a very large canal, and, at the beginning of the second act, divided into two parts, discovering the water, on which there immediately came from different parts two fleets of little gilded vessels, that gave the representation of a naval fight. It is not easy to imagine the beauty of this scene, which I took particular notice of. But all the rest were perfectly fine in their kind. The story of the opera is the...
Side 122 - On the contrary, it gives me a just indignation to see a person whose action gives new majesty to kings, resolution to heroes, and softness to lovers, thus sinking from the greatness of his behaviour, and degraded into the character of the London Prentice. I have often wished that our tragedians would copy after this great master in action. Could they make the same use of their arms and legs, and inform their faces with as significant looks and passions, how glorious would an English tragedy appear...
Side 62 - Nicolini exposed to a tempest in robes of ermine, and sailing in an open boat upon a sea of pasteboard ? What a field of raillery would they have been let into, had they been entertained with painted dragons spitting wildfire, enchanted chariots drawn by Flanders...
Side 56 - I cannot forbear thinking how naturally an historian who writes two or three hundred years hence, and does not know the taste of his wise forefathers, will make the following reflection, ' In the beginning of the eighteenth century the Italian tongue was so well understood in England, that operas were acted on the public stage in that language.
Side 55 - ... an unknown tongue. We no longer understand the language of our own stage; insomuch that I have often been afraid, when I have seen our Italian performers chattering in the vehemence of action, that they have been calling us names and abusing us among themselves: but I hope, since we do put such entire confidence in them, they will not talk against us before our faces, though they may do it with the same safety as if it were behind our backs.

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