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JACKSON, Miss., January 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: We favor the education bill now before Congress and hope that it will be enacted into law.

W. F. BOND,
State Superintendent of Schools of Mississippi, Jackson, Miss.

SALEM, OREG., January 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: I am now, and have been ever since the education bill was first introduced, a supporter of the measure, Its passage will mean better opportunities for the preparation of boys and girls for citizenship throughout the entire Nation. The passage of the bill will be the most forward movement made in education in the history of the Nation.

J: A. CHURCHILL, Superintendent of Public Instruction of Oregon.

DOVER, DEL., January 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: The importance of universal education in a Government based upon universal suffrage demands that education should be dignified by making it a department of the Federal Government. In the light of national educational needs and widely varying abilities of the State to meet those needs Federal aid to the States is as important as State equalization funds to meet the same conditions in varying parts of the same State. The education bill provides for these matters with proper safeguards and in my judgment should pass.

H. V. HOLLOWAY,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

of State of Delaware.

CARSON City, NEV., January 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: Strongly urge the immediate passage of the education bill. Recent Nevada teachers' institutes unanimously favored the same bill. Places educational interests on equality nationally with material and political interests without interfering with present absolute State control. Would stimulate and help equalize educational opportunities; provide a clearing house for disseminating latest best information on professional economic school organization and methods. Last Nevada Legislature without dissenting vote passed resolution favoring the passage of the Towner-Sterling bill.

W. J. HUNTING, Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Nevada.

Salt LAKE CITY, UTAH, January 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: Utah Teachers' Association and Utah Legislature on record supporting education bill.

C. N. JENSEN, State Superintendent of Public Instruction of State of Útah.

CHEYENNE, WYO., January 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: Wyoming State Teachers' Association has indorsed the education bill. Personally, I am strongly in favor of it and hope for its passage by the present Congress.

KATHERINE A. MORTON, State Superintendent of Schools, Wyoming.

JANUARY 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: Please let me state that I favor the bill before the Senate committee creating a Federal department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet. Even if the appropriation for this purpose were very small, I would favor the measure because it seems to me to be in line with simplification and directness in governmental affairs. At the present time several of the Federal departments touch educational matters in the States more or less intimately. Under the present arrangements there must be no small duplication of effort, and_there may be duplication of funds. To bring this important department of Federal Government under one head, with a proper and efficient organization, would undoubtedly contribute materially to the cause of education, and I believe to the cause of good government. With best wishes, I am, Yours very truly,

HARRIS HART, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Commonwealth of Virginia.

JANUARY 18, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I hope you will convey to the Senate Education Committee on Tuesday, January 22, at their hearing on the education bill pending in the present Congress, that the State Department of Education of Oklahoma is in entire sympathy with this bill.

We have read the bill very carefully, we are familiar with the program which it contemplates, and we believe thoroughly in the provisions of this bill

. It occurs to us from the specific wording of certain parts of the bill that there is absolutely no foundation for the fear on the part of some people that the Federal Government will be in control of education in the States. We need the illiteracy appropriation, the Americanization work, the physical education assistance, the teacher-training aid, and the Federal aid to equalize educational opportunity between the States. Very truly yours,

M. A. Nasa, State Superintendent, State of Oklahoma.

NASHVILLE, TENN., January 19, 1924. Miss CHARL O. WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: The State Education Department of Tennessee and all State educational organizations strongly indorse the education bill now pending before the Congress of the United States. Kindly communicate this message to the proper committees. Confirmation follows by mail.

P. L. HARNED, State Commissioner of Education of Tennessee.

SANTA FE, N. Mex., January 19, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.:
Strongly advocate passage of the education bill.

ISABE L. ECKLES,
State Superintendent of New Mexico.

TALLAHASSEE, FLA., January 19, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: In my opinion, Florida needs the enactment of the education bill to the end that the inequalities of educational opportunity arising from those of taxable wealth in the various districts of the State may be overcome. We need the law in order that we may make a better showing than at present when compared with States having more and greater sources of school revenue.

We think many of our counties and districts are doing all they can to maintain good schools, yet their school terms are not more than half the standard length, their teachers poorly trained and poorly paid. Some of us feel that if our citizens are to be efficient we should have Federal encouragement in the promotion of health and the removal of illiteracy.

W. S. CAWTHON, State Superintendent of Florida.

JEFFERSON City, Mo., January 19, 1924. CHARL WILLIAMS,

Bureau of Education, Washington, D. C.:
Am heartily in favor of Sterling educational bill (S. 1337).

Chas. R. LEE,
State Superintendent of Schools of Missouri.

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., January 19, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association: I heartily indorse the move to advance the cause of education and dignify its position in our Government by placing in the President's Cabinet a secretaryship devoted to education.

BENJAMIN J. BURRIS, Indiana State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

LITTLE Rock, ARK., January 19, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: The cause of education should have a representative in the President's Cabinet. The Federal Government in time of war requires every young man to enter the service of his country: A government which has this authority should prepare its citizenship for the best possible service to the country either in times of peace

The most important problem before the people of this country is the problem of education. In the rural communities the education bill attempts to equalize the educational opportunities of the children of the Nation. I sincerely hope that the bill will receive favorable consideration at this session of Congress.

A. B. HILL,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction of State of Arkansas.

or war.

AugustA, ME., January 19, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: The two greatest ideas which have sprung from the minds of man were born in America—a political democracy and a free public-school system.

One can not exist without the other. If Congress only knew the confusion now existing in the several education activities distributed through all departments, and if it knew what the Federal Government can do to set minimum standards to encourage universal education as a most essential enterprise, I feel sure the educational bill would receive favorable action.

AUGUSTUS O. THOMAS, State Superintendent of Public Instruction of State of Maine.

SACRAMENTO, CALIF., January 21, 1924. Miss CHÀRL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Heartily indorse the education bill as introduced at this session. Education is a matter of national interest, and Federal Government should aid in the promotion of better citizenship. Inasmuch as education is foundational in a country such as ours, it should be recognized by the creation of an executive department.

WILL C. WOOD, State Superintendent of Schools, Sacramento, Calif.

BOISE, IDAHO, January 21, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: Registered hearty indorsement of the education bill. Idaho wants this bill passed.

ELIZABETH RUSSUM, State Superintendent of Schools of Idaho.

AUSTIN, TEX., January 21, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: The Sterling-Reed bill has my full indorsement. The Nation can not measure up to its possibilities so long as there are so many glaring inequalities of educational opportunity. Certainly the intelligence of the people demands the removal of illiteracy, the Americanization of the foreign born, the promotion of physical education, and the training of teachers. Texas, seventh in wealth, might meet these requirements for herself without national aid, but her Senators and Representatives should be altruistic enough to support this measure for good that will be accomplished for the entire Nation. Texas must not live for herself alone.

S. M. N. MARRS, State Superintendent of State of Texas.

To argue in favor of what seems to the arguer a self-evident proposition is a somewhat ungracious task. Yet, while there is one person in the United States unconvinced as to the value of the education bill, I feel it a privilege and a duty to testify to my faith in its principles and my firm conviction that its enactment into law would mark a day of new and rich achievement for American education.

Because it provides for adequate recognition of education as one of the supreme activities of the national life, I am in favor of the education bill.

Because it would make possible the prevention of waste and duplication of effort in educational administration, I urge the passage of the education bill.

Because this great measure provides for cooperation with the States in such a way as to assure victorious attainment of the five great objectives of American education, I am convinced that Congress will see fit to pass this bill.

As a State superintendent of many years' standing, I am convinced that a national department of education, with a secretary in the President's Cabinet, providing for a national council of education, thus keeping in vital touch with the States, creating a research department of incalculable value to all the American Commonwealths and recognizing the principle of Federal aid to education, in order to equalize the educational opportunities of the children living under the flag, would meet a vital, fundamental need in the life of the American Republic as could no other measure now before the people.

Mrs. MARY C. C. BRADFORD,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Denver, Colo.

CONCORD, N. H., February 15, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I favor the education bill. We are one Nation. Neither wealth nor childhood be completely localized without detriment to

the Nation. The American people wherever they are and the American wealth wherever it is have a responsibility for American children wherever they may live. The Nation needs a division of education. Very truly yours,

ERNEST W. BUTTERFIELD,

Commissioner of Education.

PIERRE, S. DAK., February 16, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.; We have before us the Federal education bill (H. R. 3823, S. 1337). The State department of public instruction of South Dakota strongly indorses this bill. Our State teachers' association, composed of more than 6,000 teachers, unanimously indorses this bill. We would urge you as our representative to use any possible efforts to secure favorable support from the committee and we hope for the early enactment of this bill into law.

FRED L. Shaw, State Superintendent Public Instruction.

HARRISBURG, PA., February 16, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: A national department of education, with a secretary of education in the President's Cabinet, would make possible the unification of the numerous educational agencies now operating under Government control. It would command resources commensurate with the fundamental importance of education and adequate to its needs. Education is unquestionably the problem of supreme importance to Nation. I am strongly in favor of the education bill because it properly recognizes this fundamental tenet of our national life.

J. GEORGE BECHT, State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

LANSING, Mich., March 10, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: Fear I can not attend hearing. I wish you would read into the record of said hearing, however, this statement: Michigan educators are, I believe, a unit in supporting the education bill. Education is represented by a minister in most foreign countries. It should at least receive an equivalent recognition in the United States. If roads and military establishments are to be Federal aided, education, which is more important than both, should receive similar support.

THOMAS E. JOHNSON,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

HELENA, MONT., April 1, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: When one considers our educational weaknesses it is difficult to understand objections to the education bill. The States need not only encouragement from the Nation in solving serious educational problems, but also reliable data secured by research on which to base progressive State plans for bettering conditions. The education bill is strongly indorsed in Montana.

MAY TRUMPER,

Superintendent of Schools. Miss WILLIAMS (continuing). The American Federation of Labor was one of the earliest supporters of this great movement, and I would like you to hear now from Mr. Edward F. McGrady., representing that organization.

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