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SAND SPRINGS, OKLA., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Every support should be given to the education bill now before the Senate committee, for the future destiny of our Government depends entirely upon free speech and education as promulgated by our ancestors. Use your best efforts to have it enacted as law in this session.

T. H. STEFFENS,
Vice President Sand Springs Railway.

SAND SPRINGS, OKLA., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: There is a fine sentiment in favor of educational bill and I indorse same asking you to use your best efforts in having same enacted into law.

H. H. SNOW.

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SAND SPRINGS, OKLA., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: General feeling here prompts us to announce that we indorse the education bill and hope for its early passage.

E. M. MONSELL, President Home Building and Loan Association.

SAND SPRINGS, OKLA., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Please push the passage of the educational bill. We approve it.

L. MATTHEWS, Member of the Board of Education.

SAND SPRINGS, Okla., January, 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: People here are in favor of education bill and I ask that every effort be made to have it become a law at this session of Congress.

GEORGE McELVEY.

MIAMI, ARIZ., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.:
We heartily indorse Sterling-Reed bill.

MIAMI MASONIC STUDY CLUB.

TOPEKA, KANS., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C. DEAR Miss Williams: I am vitally interested in the education bill, Senate 1337, House of Representatives 3923, and wish to indorse it in its entirety.

This bill represents so much of vital interest to the educational opportunities of all children in our entire country that every effort should be made for its passage by this present Congress. Yours very truly,

C. A. KARLAN.

PRESCOTT, ARIZ., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.

DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I understand that the Sterling-Reed bill is up for hearing before a Senate committee and that you are interested in it. I have discussed this measure with many of the prominent citizens here, and with very few exceptions find the sentiment in favor of the passage of the bill by the Congress. Yours very truly,

MORRIS GOLDWATER,

Mayor, City of Prescott.

LAWRENCE, KANS., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I notice there is now pending in the Congress of the United States a bill to create a department of education and to otherwise improve educational opportunities for children as well as aliens.

Being most heartily in accord with the purport of these measures and believing that it is time that our country adopted proper methods for the education and proper enlightenment of our children with a view to make them better Americans, and also that the strangers in our midst may be imbued with a true patriotism which will mean the perpetuation of our Government and civilization, I take this opportunity of most fervently urging upon our Congressmen and Senators a speedy passage of the measure now under consideration by them.

If we desire our Government to live, our institutions to be perpetuated, and our citizens to be contented and prosperous, it seems to me that some such action must be had; furthermore, I believe there is a growing sentiment, at least in this section of the United States, that this very important matter should no longer be neglected.

May I urge, therefore, in what I conceive to be for the best interests of these United States, that these measures may receive early and favorable attention and action. Very truly yours,

R. E. MELVIN.

Fort Scott, KANS., January 26, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: Let me lend my humble help to you and your association in the great work you are doing in the education bili,

It is the one big hope-public schools under supervision of the Governmentfor all its children. Success is assured. Because you're right.

REX WALLS.

ATCHISON, KANS., January 27, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.: We indorse national education bill now before Congress.

FREDRICK SHIPPER.

SHAWNEE, OKLA., January 27, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.: We e are much interested in education bills S. 1337 and H. R. 3823, and

urge its passage.

J. L. FORD.

Fort Scott, KANS., January 27, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I strongly indorse the education bill now pending in Congress and hope for its speedy passage. Yours very truly,

HARRY J. BAMBERGER.

San Diego, CALIF., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.:

Directors of the San Diego Chamber of Commerce unanimously indorse bill to create department of education and other improvements of educational opportunities. Urgently request your whole-hearted cooperation and support of this measure and request you personally present proper Senate committee all possible advantages proposed in this bill.

SAN DIEGO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
John H. N. ADAMS, Acting Secretary.

GUTHRIE, OKLA., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.:

Beg to add my indorsement to the national educational bill now under consideration. Hope for quick passage of this progressive measure.

FRANK A. DERR.

INSPIRATION, ARIZ., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.: I heartily indorse Sterling-Reed bill creating department of education.

W. W. JOURDIN.

YAKIMA, Wash., January 28, 1924. CHARL O. WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Send writer copies of the education bill and express to Committee on Education our hearty approval of the measure.

E. B. VELIKANJE.

Fort Scott, KANS., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.: Every possible effort should be made to secure passage of educational bill.

W. L. BUZZARD, Secretary Scottish Rite Bodies.

MANHATTAN, KANS., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I wish to add my indorsement to the measure now under consideration by the Senate for the creation of a department of education and to otherwise improve educational opportunities.

I sincerely hope this measure may be pushed through the Congress at this session. Very truly yours,

J. C. Ewing, Cashier.

Salina, Kans., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C. My Dear Miss WILLIAMS: I wish to indorse the education bill now pending in the Congress of the United States, and hope you will use your influence in its behalf to create a department of education and otherwise improve educational opportunities for children as well as aliens. Thanking you for any favors shown this educational bill, I am, Yours truly,

CHARLES F. W. SEITZ.

SALINA, KANs., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I wish to express my approval of the education bill and urge its passage. Respectfully yours,

W. H. PACKARD.

SAN DIEGO, CALIF., Jannary 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Field Secretary, National Education Association,

Washington, D. C.: DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I assure you that the people of this city and community are largely in favor of a department of education in our Government. I understand our Nation stands ninth in literacy. I assume that that arises from the fact that the illiterates of Europe have come to this country while the literate classes have remained at home. That is why some of the foreign countries stand higher in literacy than the United States; if we were to return to Europe all of the illiterates we have received from there the United States would stand high in literacy and those countries would stand low.

The education of the youth of our land demands that every facility to get knowledge to the young mind be taken advantage of and that nothing in that line be omitted or delayed. The quickest way to get that knowledge to the youth is through organized and systematic effort, and not.by haphazard methods as have been employed since America was settled.

The full support of Congress to the bill for the creation of a department of education is needed and is therefore asked. Yours very truly,

W. J. MOSSHOLDER.

FORT SCOTT, KANS., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Field Secretary, National Education Association,

Washington, D. C.: MY DEAR MISS WILLIAMS: We are very much interested in the passage of the Sterling bill, Senate bill 1337. We believe that this bill has a great deal of merit and urge its immediate passage. Yours truly,

JAMES T. MAYALL.

OSAGE CITY, KANS., January 28, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C. DEAR Miss WILLIAMS; We are for the education bill to create a department of education.. Do all you can to have it enacted into law. Very truly yours,

ARTHUR C. BROWN.

PARSONS, KANS., January 29, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: We heartily indorse the education bill now pending in Congress and hope you secure its passage.

M. A. ARNETT.
J. W. SHELLMAN.
H. B. ELLEDGE.
G. E. DIENST.

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FORT Scott, KANS., January 29, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,
Field Secretary National Education Association,

Washington, D. C.:
Sterling Senate bill 1337. Please urge its passage soon as possible.

R. E. TIERNAN.

PARSONS, Kans., January 29, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS, Washington, D. C.:
I heartily indorse the educational bill now before Congress.

JESSE MELONE.

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FLAGSTAFF, ARIZ., January 29, 1924.
To the United States Senate:

We, the undersigned citizens of Flagstaff, Ariz., do most respectfully and
urgently ask your honorable body to act favorably upon the Sterling-Reed bill
to create a department of education and otherwise improve educational
opportunities:

J. E. Jones, judge, superior court; T. E. Pollock, president Pollock

Investment Co.; L. B. McMullen, president Northern Arizona
Normal School; Tom L. Rees, clerk superior court; W. H.
Conley, master Flagstaff Lodge, F.and A. M.; Breen Lewis Drug
Co.; John A. Thomas, superintendent of schools; V. M. Slipher,
director Lowell Observatory; G. A. Herrington, manager Electric
Light Co. and member of school board; C. B. Wilson, attorney;
F. W. Perkins, attorney; R. O. Raymond, physician; E. S. Miller,
physician.

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Fort Scott, Kans., January 29, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.
MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: The education bill, introduced by Senator Thomas
Sterling, has my unqualified indorsement. I hope that it has a speedy passage.
I will be glad of any thing I can do to advance its passage now. Every ethical
dentist here approves.
Very truly yours,

H. F. CHAPMAN.

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PITTSBURG, KANS., January 29, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary, National Education Association, Washington, D. C.
MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: No effort is too great for the movement in behalf
of the education bill now before Congress. It gives me great pleasure to indorse
the passage of this bill, which will be of such far reaching benefit to our country,
our people, and our homes.
Yours truly,

W. B. Fox.

WILSON, KANS, January 29, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary National Education Association, Washington, D. C.
MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: Senate Committee on Education and Labor are
beginning hearings on the education bill to create a department of education
which will improve the educational opportunities for children in this great United
States of ours.

I wish to personally indorse this bill and I hope that it will
receive recognition and a stipulated amount appropriated for carrying out its
provisions. In my opinion this amount can not be too large, since the number
of illiterates in our country show that it is most emphatically needed.

Hoping that you will do all in your power to carry the bill through, I beg to
remain,
Respectfully and fraternally yours,

CHARLES A. KYNER.

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