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Fort Scott, KANS., January 29, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C. DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: We heartily indorse the education bill now pending and hope for its immediate passage. Respectfully yours,

D. PRAGER & Sons.

PHOENIX, ARIZ., January 30, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C. I wish to indorse emphatically the Sterling-Reed hill. I think this would be a grand work.

A. L. MOORE, President Lions Club,

WICHITA, KANS., January 30, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Field Secretary National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: Please register my hearty indorsement of the educational bill now pending in the United States Congress.

I am sure the 4,653 members of Midian Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of which I have the honor to represent as recorder, will join me in the indorsement of this bill.

Hoping this bill will receive favorable consideration through the influence of your association and with the prayers of the faithful for its ultimate passage, Í am, Sincerely yours,

J. F. BENNETT.

WICHITA, KANS., January 31, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.: I certainly indorse the education bill and will urge other citizens to wire or write their indorsement.

W. S. BRANT.

SYRACUSE, KANS., January 31, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.:
I hereby heartily indorse the education bill pending in Congress.

GEORGE GETTY.

SYRACUSE, KANS., January 31, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I understand that the Senate commenced hearings on the bill to create a department of education. I herewith give my hearty indorsement of the measure, which I understand is identical with the Towner-Sterling bill. Very truly yours,

GEORGE GETTY.

SALINA, KANS., January 31, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington. D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I wish to write you regarding the education bill, Senate No. 1337, House 3923, and to express to you my honest desire that this should receive a favorable consideration at the hands of the Congress of the United States at once.

I can not lay too much stress upon this. I believe a short letter to you will answer every purpose, and I sincerely trust that this bill may pass and become

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Yours truly,

GEORGE D. ADAMS.

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WICHITA, KANS., February 1, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,
National Education Association,

Washington, D. C.
MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I wish to add my strong personal support for the
passage of the Sterling-Reed educational bill in the present United States Con-
gress. It is a standing shame and disgrace to the intelligence of the people of the
United States of America that the department of education is not represented in
the President's Cabinet. Millions of dollars have been spent in the departments
of War and the Navy but “not one cent" for education. I want to assure you
that you have my hearty support in any honorable manner to secure the passage
of the Sterling-Reed educational bill.
Yours truly,

B. F. DUNKIN, Secretary, Scottish Rite Temple.

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NEWTON, KANS., February 1, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

Washington, D. C.
DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I most heartily indorse the education bill now pending
in the Congress of the United States, same having been introduced by Senator
Sterling of South Dakota.
It is my understanding that it is identical with the Towner-Sterling bill.
Yours truly,

CLAYTON LEHMAN.

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WICHITA, KANS., February 2, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: This is to express my indorsement of the education bill now before Congress and to state that I believe I am expressing the unanimous hope of all the members of the board of education of the city of Wichita, Kans., as well as the leading educators of our city schools, that the bill will become law. Very truly yours,

BRUCE GRIFFITH, President Board of Education.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: You are hereby authorized to use my name in urging the passage of the education bill, giving all children an equal chance.

JOHN M. CARR, Mayor, Enid, Okla.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: The public school is not the place to teach religion. Make the Towner-Reed bill a law.

W. A. DURST.

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ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Let the education of our children be free of religious bigotry. Give every person a chance to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience. Congress should pass the education bill.

J. E. GEORGE.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: The education of our children is more important than the maintenance of any dead superstition. Urge the passage of the education bill.

G. A. GUMERSON.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: The education of our youth is so important that it merits recognition by the creation of a special department of Government. Please urge the passage of the bill.

T. B. HINSON.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Let us recognize the importance of the education of our youth by the passage of the education bill now before Congress.

W. E. LAMERTON.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: The passage of the education bill now before Congress will do much toward eliminating the blight of illiteracy from our land in the name of the boys and girls. Demand its passage.

M. A. MITCHELL.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Give the education of our youth its rightful place by the passage of the Towner-Reed bill.

S. N. MAYBERRY.

ENID, OKLA., February 3, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Our educational system needs the impetus which the passage of the bill now before Congress will give it. Demand its passage.

ELI W. PERRY.

ENID, OKLA., February 4, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: The interests of the boys and girls should be considered in preference to the selfish interest of any church organization. Urge the passage of the education bill.

NORMAN E. JONES.

ENID, OKLA., February 4, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Keep America American. To that end I urge the passage of the education bill now before Congress.

W. R. LENCE.

HOISINGTON, KANS., February 4, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: If Socrates came to revisit this world and came to the United States, he would see many things of interest. Many of the things he would see would not be much of a surprise to him, but the one thing that would give him the surprise of his life would be the public schools. When he lived school and education was for a privileged few. Now it is necessary for all. But our school system is way short of what it should be. We should go ahead and improve our system so that those who die to-day, if they returned in a few short years, would see the vast improvement.

Education is an absolute necessity with our mode of government. Our Government, if we are to enjoy its continuance, must be composed of people with some education; people who can do their own thinking. If we had some one else to do our thinking and our voting, then they would look after our welfare, as seemed best to them from their own standpoint. But we are not ready to admit there is any form of government equal to our own. Then let us look to it and see that our voters have education so that they can cast an intelligent ballot.

Our Government is now looking after many other things, with a cabinet officer in charge, of very little importance as compared with education, and it is high time Congress is getting its eyes opened and doing something to assist in the education of our children and the aliens coming to our shores.

My constant association with people of alien birth places me in a particularly good position to observe them and naturally causes me to inform myself regarding them and ascertain from them their views and ambitions. I therefore consider that I am somewhat acquainted with their needs. I am fully convinced that the great majority of aliens coming to our shores would, if given the opportunity of learning the full meaning of our Government and what it stands for, become good, honorable, law-abiding and patriotic citizens. The great mass of them know but little of our principles of government and follow some “bellwether,'' very often of very little education, and too often leading the voters to the polls at so much per.

I sincerely believe the great majority of the people favor the passage of the education bill now pending in Congress of the United States, and we of the Middle West can not see any reason why we should be put off any longer, and think it should be passed by this Congress. The President has practically declared himself in favor of such legislation, the people are ready for it, and any honest thinking man or woman can not help but see the need, so why not make it a law of this grand country of ours without further delay.

I realize there is a small element opposed to the education bill and this is nothing more than natural. No legislation was ever passed that suited all; that would be asking too much. I am fully convinced that the element opposed is much smaller than they would have Congress believe they are; so why delay on account of the few, when so many are so strongly in favor.

I am firmly convinced that a great many of the very best citizens of this United States are strongly in favor of this bill, and would write to their Members of Congress, but they think it will do no good, that their letters will not be read, etc., and have resigned themselves, and just let happen whatever happens and try and do the best they can. Yet and at the same time they consider the passage of the education bill of more necessity and importance than any other legislation now pending in Congress. For this reason I have included in this letter reference to the feelings of many others with whom I have discussed this question and this education bill.

I presume I am a little more zealous about this subject than most people, for the reason that when I was a boy I was so situated that an education was impossible for me. My schooling, therefore, is practically nil. What little education I have, had to be dug out by myself. I herded cattle and carried books in my saddlebags, and have never stopped trying to better myself. Pardon me

ME

for these references of myself. I simply wanted to say it to you that you might
know why I wanted the present generation and the generations to follow to enjoy
the best possible educational facilities obtainable.
Hoping that ere long the education bill will be a law, I am,
Yours very truly,

John H. HARTMAN,

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LIBERAL, Kans., February 5, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.:
We earnestly urge favorable action by Congress on the education bill intro-
duced in the Senate by Senator Thomas Sterling, No. 1337, and House bill by
Congressman Reed, No. 3923.

CHARLES SUMMER.
R. E. COLVIN.

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HOISINGTON, KANS., February 5, 1924. Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,

National Education Association, Washington, D. C.: Education of children and aliens, formerly considered luxury for few, now the necessity for the many. May I urge you to call attention of Congress that the education bill is the most vital question before them? Citizens generally more interested in passage of this measure than any other. Letter follows.

John H. HARTMAN.

EL DORADO, KANS., February 5, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,
Field Secretary National Education Association,

Washington, D. C.
MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: The general sentiment of the citizens of this State
is for the education bill such as introduced in Senate by Senator Thomas Ster-
ling and in the House by Congressman Daniel A. Reed. Ît will be a great blessing
to humanity if this bill successfully passes the House and Senate.
Very truly yours,

J. H. SANDIFER.

WICHITA, KANS., February 5, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,
Field Secretary, National Education Association,

Washington, D. C.
DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: Please convey to the Representatives and Senator
from this district the information that I am most heartily in favor of the educa-
tion bill, S. 1337, and H. R. 3923, now before Congress, and sincerely trust they
will use their influence and vote to secure an early passage of this bill.
Sincerely yours,

W. W. PEARCE.

WICHITA, KANS., February 5, 1924.
Miss CHARL WILLIAMS,
Field Secretary, National Education Association,

Washington, D. C.
MY DEAR Miss WILLIAMS: I desire to present my unqualified indorsement of
the education bill now pending in Congress, that you may present same before
the hearing now pending in the Senate of the United States.
Very respectfully,

JAMES F, McCoy.

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