The Woman's World, Volumer 1-3

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Source Book Press, 1888

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Side 232 - I trust is their destiny ? — to console the afflicted, to add sunshine to daylight, by making the happy happier ; to teach the young and the gracious of every age to see, to think, and feel, and therefore to become more actively and
Side 38 - Seasons does not contain a single new image of external nature ; and scarcely presents a familiar one from which it can be inferred that the eye of the Poet had been steadily fixed upon his object, much less that his feelings had urged him to work upon it in the spirit of genuine imagination.
Side 492 - Weep with me, all you that read This little story : And know, for whom a tear you shed Death's self is sorry. 'Twas a child that so did thrive In grace and feature, As heaven and nature seemed to strive Which owned the creature.
Side 440 - We may live without poetry, music and art, We may live without conscience, and live without heart; We may live without friends; we may live without, books; But civilized man cannot live without cooks.
Side 492 - Therefore we proclaim, If any spirit breathes within this round Uncapable of weighty passion — As from his birth being hugged in the arms, And nuzzled 'twixt the breasts of Happiness — Who winks and shuts his apprehension up From common sense of what men were, and are ; Who would not know what men must be : let such Hurry amain from our black-visaged shows ; We shall affright their eyes.
Side 2 - On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object : can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France ? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt...
Side 40 - And, after all, what is a fashion? From the artistic point of view, it is usually a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months.
Side 179 - Now these are poppies in her locks, White poppies she must wear; Must wear a veil to shroud her face And the want graven there...
Side 292 - Ring out a slowly dying cause. And ancient forms of party strife ; Ring in the nobler modes of life With sweeter manners, purer laws.
Side 38 - Women's Voices. An Anthology of the most Characteristic Poems by English, Scotch, and Irish Women. Edited by Mrs. William Sharp. Sonnets of this Century. With an Exhaustive and Critical Essay on the Sonnet.

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