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While the subjects sat still for about an hour in this hot, humid, stagnant air the pulse rate increased from 104 to 158, or 54 heats for subject No. 2; from 144 to 170, or 26 beats for subject No. 4; and from 110 to 156, or 46 beats for subject No. 5.

All subjects perspired very profusely, their clothing being thoroughly saturated and their shoes being partly filled with sweat; they were weak and dizzy, and all "panted" or "puffed" upon making the slightest effort. Subject No. 4 had acute soreness of the cheat or lungs which did not disappear until about 10 hours after leaving the hot location.

The resultant effects of sitting for an hour in the hot, humid air at 96° F. (Table II A) without air movement and doing no work other than occasional taking of body temperature or of temperature of the surrounding air, essentially checked those in still, saturated air at 95°; and all who underwent the hour test felt that it was a difficult experience.

TABLE II A.-Effects of resting one hour in still air at 96° wet bulb, 96° dry bulb (100 per cent relative humidity).

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99.0 122 82 98.9 88 126 82 98.2 104 116 72 99.2 96 All were feeling fine. At 8.55 Nos. 2 and 5 only

just moist. Nos. 1 and 4 were sweating

fairly freely.
(All stood it well except for the profuse perspira-

tion. Place was damp with drippers falling
fairly freely and water running on floor.

Nos. 1, 2, and 5 feeling well, but puifing a
99.7
100.0 ...

99.5...

100.0

little. Heads were clear. No. 1 apparently
not feeling quite as well as others; sweating
heavily. No. 4 did not move from a reclin-
ing position and, while sweating freely, did

not puff or get dizzy.
100.0 ........ 100,7

100.6

100.8.... Nol's head felt a little full and he was puffing

some. No. 2 felt effort and puffed, but
could stay much longer. No. 5 felt fine, but
puffed some on standing up. No. 4 felt about
normal until he arose to take pulse, then he
felt somewhat dizzy and puffed a little. All

were sweating very freely.
100.4........ 101.2 128!.........101.7) 134.... 101.3 132
101. 108 78 101. 4 132 104 72 101.8 174 98 64 101.6 154 No. 1 was puffing perceptibly, felt a little dizzy,

especially on standing, and was sweating
very profusely. No. 2 had a little headache,
especially on standing. No. 4 was slightly
dizzy on standing, but felt he had had a com-
paratively easy time. No. 5 felt fairly well,
but pulled on standing. All were perspiring
very freely. No. 4 had much swoat in boots.

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Sitting an hour in still, saturated air at 100° F. (Table III A) caused symptoms similar to those found at lower temperatures, but they appeared earlier. Each subject quickly had definite increase of body temperature and pulse rate, subjects Nos. 2 and 5 having a maximum body temperature of 102.3°, subject No. 1 of 103.3°, and subject No. 4 of 103.8°. Subject No. 2 had a maximum pulse rate of 152, subject No. 5 of 168, and subject No. 4 of more than 175.

All perspired very profusely (even the shoes being partly filled with perspiration) and were definitely weak and dizzy upon leaving the place of the test. The symptoms persisted for about an hour afterwards. This was a very trying test for all.

TABLE III A.-Effects of resting one hour in still air at 100° wet bulb, 100° dry bulb (100 per cent relative humidity).

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78 99.5 130 106 74 98.8 104 Nos.2 and 5 sweating just a little; Nos. 1 and 4

sweating profusely. Had taken no exercise
except walking about 50 feet on the level. An
Italian who had pushed a car a few hundred
feet in this air for two months said he was
about ready to quit: he was sweating pro-
fusely and looked thin: his skin felt hot.
Another Italian was not even sweating; was

apparently unaffected.
100.6 ............ 100.

All were sweating very profusely, but seemed

to be feeling well as yet. Entered this place
at 9.15. Skin of fingers shriveled at 9.40. No.

1 had chilly sensations on back at 9.40.
101.7 175 ........ 101.2 166

103.5.
62 103.8 168 102 68 102.3 168 At this time all felt fit; were somewhat dizzy,

but did not feel, in general, as badly as when
leaving the hot location.

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EFFECT WITH AIR MOVEMENT.

In the moving air at 91|° and 98 per cent relative humidity (no tests being made on subject No. 5 at this temperature in still air). Figure 1 shows that the body temperature of subject No. 5 increased very little by sitting still for an hour, but that it was definitely increased in moving, saturated air 95°, more seriously affected by moving, saturated air 96£°, and still more so by saturated air at 9Si° temperature. Subject No. 5 (as well as the other subjects) was unable to endure for the full hour the moving, saturated air at 100°, and the graph shows that this air, though endured less than the usual hour, ran his body temperature 3.1 degrees above that at the beginning of the test, or to above 102° F.

As was the ease in the still air, the effect of the moving air on the pulse of subject No. 5 was similar to the effect of the moving air on his temperature, except that in the 95° moving air his pulse did not rise as did his temperature, but fell slightly instead. This was probably due to the fact that his pulse was high at the beginning of this experiment on account of exertion in helping set the fan; otherwise it is probable that his pulse rate would have remained practically the same throughout this test. There was an increase, from the initial rate, of 12 beats in the 91 J° moving air, of 20 beats in the 96J° moving air, of 38 beats in the 100° moving air (in 49 minutes, as he could not remain the full hour), and 40 beats in the 98£° moving air.

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