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In the saturated air at 100° (Table III B), subject No. 2 sat at a point where the air had a velocity of 200 to 300 linear feet per minute, subject No. 4 in velocity of 700 to 800 feet, and subject No. 5 in velocity of 650 to 700 feet per minute. No one was able to remain the full hour in this moving, saturated air at 100°, subject No. 2 being compelled to leave after sitting still for 45 minutes, subject No. 4 leaving after 40 minutes, and subject No. 5 leaving after 49 minutes. All subjects began to feel ill in less than 30 minutes in this swiftly-moving, saturated air at 100°; all perspired excessively and felt dizzy and weak, All were convinced that to try to remain the full hour might result in collapse, and were united in the conviction that while it was advantageous to give motion to saturated air below 98° F., movement was a decided disadvantage to saturated air above 98° F. It will be noted that pulse rate and body temperature apparently did not have time to go to higher limits, though all subjects had body temperature over 102° F. and an increase in pulse rate of 40 per cent or over.

SUMMARY.

A. Remaining at rest in saturated air at 9U° F. for one hour,
With no air movement caused —

1. An increase in body temperature;

2. A moderate increase in pulse rate;

3. Profuse sweating;

4. After effects of dizziness and weakness. With air movement caused —

1. Slight or no increase in body temperature;

2. Slight increase in pulse rate;

3. Slight perspiration;

4. No after effects;

5. No ill effects at any time; but the noise of the fan was

annoying.

B. Remaining at rest in saturated air at 95° for one hour,
With no air movement caused—

1. An increase in body temperature;

2. A marked increase in pulse rate;

3. Very profuse sweating, clothing being saturated with

perspiration and sweat in shoes of all subjects;

4. Dizziness on movement, and increase in depth and rate

of respiration (pulling somewhat on slight movement); chilly sensations in some subjects. With air movement (250 to 600 linear feet per minute) caused—

1. Slight or no rise in body temperature;

2. Slight or no rise in pulse rate;

3. Profuse sweating, but not sufficient to wet all clothing;

4. No untoward symptoms yi subjects other than profuse

sweating.

C. Remaining at rest in saturated air at 96°, still and moving, caused the subjects to experience symptoms practically the same as those felt instill or moving saturated air, ropectively, at 95° F.

D. Remaining at rest in saturated air at 98*° F. for one hour,
With air movement caused—

1. An increase in body temperature;

2. An increase in pulse rate (in one case to 183);

3. Very profuse sweating, clothing being saturated (sweat

could be poured from shoes);

4. Dizziness on movement. All felt that little work could

be done at this temperature and that the conditions were much worse than in moving saturated air at 95°, but not as bad as moving saturated air at 100° F. E. Remaining at rest in saturated air at 100° F., With no air movement caused—•

1. A marked rise in body temperature, which reached

102.3° F.;

2. A marked rise in pulse rate, varying in different subjects

from 152 to more than 175;

3. Profuse sweating, the shoes being partly filled with

perspiration;

4. Early appearance of dizziness, weakness, and persistence

of symptoms for about one hour after test. The test was very trying. With air movement (200 to 800 linear feet per minute) caused— All the above symptoms, and no subject remained a full hour. The untoward effects upon man of almost saturated air with temperature above 90° F. and below 98° F. are much less when the air is moving than when it is still. Further, the output or work that can be done is greater when the air is moving than when it is still, with the above temperature and humidity.

No beneficial effects were found by moving saturated air at 98.6° or 100° F., even at high velocities; and there was apparently some disadvantage.

BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND INFANT MORTALITY, 1921 AND 1922.

PROVISIONAL FIGURES FOR 1922 AND RATES FOB 1921 AND 1922 IN THE BIRTH REGISTRATION AREA OF THE UNITED STATES.

The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce, has issued a pamphlet entitled "Summary of Provisional Birth and Mortality Figures, 1922," from which the table printed below is taken. Similar data are given in the pamphlet for 547 cities in the United States having more than 10,000 population.

It is stated that birth rates, for 1922 were lower than for 1921 in every one of the 25 States for which figures for the two years are shown in the following summary. The highest 1922 birth rate (34.4 per 1,000 population) is shown for the cities of Wyoming and the lowest (16.5) for the rural districts of Connecticut.

Death rates for 1922 were slightly higher than for 1921 in 19 of the 27 States shown for both years. The highest 1922 death rate (21.8 per 1,000 population) is shown for the cities of Mississippi and the lowest (7.4) for the rural sections of Montana.

Infant mortality rates for 1922.on the whole balance those of 1921, only 10 of the 25 States showing higher rates in 1922 than in 1921. The highest 1922 infant mortality rate (105) appears for the cities of South Carolina and the lowest (55) for the rural districts of Nebraska. Infant mortality rates shown for both years for 51 cities of 100,000 population or more in 1920 are in 19 of these cities lower in 1922 than in 1921, the highest rate (107) appearing for Trenton and the lowest (50) for Seattle.

Births and deaths. 1922 (provisional figures), and birth, death, and infant mortality rates, 1921 and 192.', in the birth registration area of the United States.

Figure* Tor Massachusetts and t'tah arc omitted because transcripts for the entire vear have not been received. The term "cities" indicates municipalities of 10.000 inhabitants or more in 192a]

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Rural...

12,209

22. I

1,001

1 Includes District o( Columbia.

«Not in the birth registration area in 1921.

Births and death*. 19it (provisional figure*), and birth, death, and infant mortality rates, Hfil and l^ii. in the birth registration area of the United States—Continued.

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DEATH RATES IN A GROUP OF INSURED PERSONS.

COMPARISON OF DEATH BATES FOR PRINCIPAL CAUSES, APRIL AND MAY. 192S, AND

MAY AND YEAR, 1922.

The accompanying tabic is taken from the Statistical Bulletin of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. for June, 1923, and presents the mortality experience of the industrial department of the company for the months of April and May, 1923, and May and year, 1922. The rates are based on a strength of approximately 14,500,000 insured persons.

The death rate for this group of persons declined 7.6 per cent in May from the rate for April and was 3 per cent lower than the rate for May, 1922.

With the exception of tuberculosis, which showed a slight rise, all of the diseases of numerical importance registered lower rates in May than in April, the largest declines being shown for influenza and pneumonia. Appreciable decreases were also shown for cancer, cerebral hemorrhage, organic heart diseases, and Blight's disease. The death rate for measles continued high during May, and it is stated that the mortality from that disease to date indicates that the death rate for 1923 for measles will be the highest that has been recorded for many years.

Death rates (annual basil) for principal causes of death -per 100,000 lires exposed, April and May, 192.1, and May and year, 1922.

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Other external causes (excluding suicides and homicides)

Traumatism by automobile

All other causes

57.9 13.1 194.4

-.:.. I

il.ii

201.1

54.8

12.3

233.1

57.7

1.3.5

i "Mi

1 Based on provisional estimate of lives exposed to risk in 1922. 'Not available.

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