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males to 1,000 females. As there is a large excess of females over males in the general population, this ratio does not give a true proportion. The actual death rate for males was 13.6 per 1,000 population, and that for females 12.0, giving an actual ratio of about 1,130 to 1,000.

Infant mortality rate.—A most favorable record for 1022 is shown in the infant mortality rate of 77 per 1,000 births, the lowest ever recorded, the rate of 80 for the year 1920 being the lowest previously on record. The progress made in saving the lives of infants is shown more clearly by going back to the beginning of the present century. In 1901 the rate was 151, or nearly double that for 1922. The importance of this saving of infant life may be more fully appreciated when it is noted that in 1901 the actual number of births was 150,000 more than in 1922, whereas the actual number of survivors in 1922 was only 60,000 less than that in 1901. Thus, by reducing the infantile death rate, more than half of the decline in the number of births has been made up.

Causes of death.—The most important single cause of the increased death rate for 1922 over that for 1921 was stated to be influenza, which was held responsible for 21,498 deaths in 1922 as against 8,995 in 1921, accounting for nearly one-half of the total increase in the number of deaths. Diseases of the heart caused 59,837 deaths, an increase of 6,127 over the number for 1921; bronchitis caused 40,912 deaths as compared with 33,684 in 1921; and the pneumonia deaths numbered 40,930 as compared with 34,708 for 1921.

AUTOMOBILE FATALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES, 1917-1922.

The Department of Commerce announces that the returns compiled by the Bureau of the Census show that during the year 1922 11,666 deaths resulting from accidents caused by automobiles and other motor vehicles (excluding motor cycles) occurred within the death registration area of the United States (exclusive of Hawaii), which area contains 85 per cent of the total population. This number represents a death rate of 12.5 per 100,000 population, as against 11.5 in 1921, 10.4 in 1920, 9.4 in 1919, 9.3 in 1918, and 9 in 1917. In the 27 States for which data for 1917 are available the actual number of theso deaths increased from 6,014 in that year to 9,581 in 1922, the corresponding rates for these two years being 8.7 and 12.9. CITY REPORTS FOR WEEK ENDED NOVEMBER 3, 1923—Continued.

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS.

The column headed "Median for previous years" gives the median number of cases reported dnring the corresponding week of the years 1915 to 1922, inclusive. In instances in which data for the full eight years are incomplete, the median is that for the number of years for which information is available.

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DIPHTHERIA.

See p. 2796: also Current State summaries, p. 2783; and Monthly summaries by States, p. 2787.

INFLUENZA.

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CITY REPORTS FOR WEEK ENDED NOVEMBER 3, 1923 -Continued.

LEPROSY.

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MEASLES. See p. 2790; alsa Current State summaries, p. 2783, and Monthly summaries by

States, p. 2787.

PELLAGRA.

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DEATHS DURING WEEK ENDED NOVEMBER 24, 1923.

Summary of information received by telegraph from industrial insurance companie: for

week ended November 24, 1923, and corresponding week of 1922. (From the Weekly

Health Index, November 27, 1923, issued by the Bureau of the Census, Department of

Commerce.)

Week ended Corresponding Nov. 24, 1923. week, 1923.

Policies in force 55,670,715 51,357, 6S8

Number of death claims 10,361 9, 043

Death claims per 1,000 policies in force, annual rate 9. 7 9. 2

Deaths from all causes in certain large cities of the United States during the week ended November 24, 1923, infant mortality, annual death rate, and comparison trith corresponding week of 1922. (From the Weekly Health Inder, November 27, 1923, issued by the bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce.)

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t Annual rate per 1,000 population.

• Deaths under 1 year per 1,00) birth*—an annua) rate based on deaths under 1 vear for the week and estimated birth:, for 1922. Cities left blank are not in the registration area for births.

• Deaths for week ended Friday, Nov. 23, 1923.

Deaths from all causes in certain large cities of the United States during the week ended November 24, 1923, infant mortality, annual death rate, and comparison with corresponding week of 1922. (From the Weekly Health Index, November 27, 1923, issued oy the Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce)—Continued.

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Spokane, Wash

Springfield, Mass

Svraeuse, N. Y

Toledo, Ohio

Trenton, N. J

Utica.N. Y

Washington, D. C

Wilmington, Del

Worcester, Mass

Yonkers, N. Y

Youngstown, Ohio

22 l:i 00 SO 00 80 00 01

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> Deaths for week ended Friday, Nov. 23,1923. 71226°—23 2

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