Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

Tho' lumble my lot, calm content gilds the scenes

For my fair one delights in the grove; And a palace I'd quit for a dance on the green, With the sweet little girl that I love.

The rose on her cheeks, &c. No ambition I know but to call her my own;

No fame but her praise wish to prove; My happiness centres in Fanny alone; She's the sweet litile girl that I love.

The rose on her cheeks, &c.

A A

'PLAGUE on those musty old lubbers,

Who tell us to fast and to think,
And with patience fall in with life's rubbers,

With nothing but water to drink. A can of good stuff had they twigg'd it, 'Twould have set them with pleasure agog;

And, spight of the rules
Of the schools,

The old fools
Wou'd all of 'em swigg'd it,

And swore there was nothing like grog. My father, when last I from Guinea

Return’d, with abundance of wealth,
Cry'd Jack, never be such a ninny

To drink-said I, Daddy, your health;
So I show'd hiin the stuff, and he twigg’d it,
And it set the old codger agog;

And he swigg’d, and mother,

And sister, and brother,
And I swigg'd, and all of us swigg'd it,
And swore there was nothing like grog.

Tother

T'other day, as the chaplain was preaching,

Behind him I curiously slunk;
And while he our duty was teaching,

As how we shou'd never get drunk,
I show'd him the stuff, aud he twigg'd it,
And it soon set his rev'rence agog,

And he swigg’d, and Nick swigg’d,

And Ben swigg'd, and Dick swiggód, And I swigg'd, and all of us swigg’d it,

And swore there was nothing like grog.

Then trust me, there's nothing like drinking,

So pleasant on this side the grave; It keeps the unhappy from thinking,

And makes e'en more valiant the brave;
As for me, from the moment I twiyg'd it,
The good stuff has so set me agog,

Sick or well, late and carly,
Wind foully or fairly,
Ilelm a-lee or a weather,

For hours together,
I've constantly swigg'd it,

And, damn me, there's nothing like Srog.

WIE

IIEN in war, on the ocean we meet the

proud foe, Tho' with ardour for conquest our bosoms may

glow; Let us see on their vessels old England's flag wave, They shall find British sailors but conquer to save!

See

K 3

See their tri-colour'd ensigns we view from afar, With three cheers they are welcom'd by each BriWhile the genius of Britain still bids us advance, Our guns hurl in thunders defiance to France.

tish tar;

But mark the last broadside!--she sinks! down

she goes! Quickly man all your boats, they no longer are

foes; To snatch a brave fellow from a wat'ry grave, Is worthy of Britons-who conquer to save.

Happyland! thou hast now in defence of thy rights, Brave Nelson, who the man and the hero unites; The friend to the wretched: the boast of the brave; He lives but to conquer, and conquers to save!

W
THEN Orpheus went down to the regions

below,
Which men are forbidden to see;
He tun'd up his lyre, as old histories show,

To set his Eurydice free,
To set his Eurydice free.

All hell was astonislı'd a person so wise

Should rashly endanger his life, And venture so far; but how vast their surprise !

When they heard that he came for his wife! How vast their surprise ! When they heard that he came for his wife!

To

[ocr errors]

To find out a punishment due to his fault,

Old Pluto long puzzled his brain; But hell had not torments sufficient, he thought;

So lie gave him his wife back again.

But pity succeeding found place in his heart;

And, pleas'd with his playing so well, Ile took her again in reward of his art;

Such merit had music in liell!

WHEN
CHEN the drum beats to arms, each bold

British Tar
Bids farewell to his girl, wife, or friend;
Courageously flies to the dangers of war,

His Country and King to defend;
His heart burns for vict'ry, for honour, and gain,

Deterinin’d his foes to subdue; Thus flies to the bulwarks that sail on the main,

None can equal the courage of true blue.

How noble is the sight of the grand British fleet,

As down channel their course they do steer! Each true British Tar longs his enemy to meet,

No storms nor no dangers does fear; His heart burns for vict'ry, for honour, and gain,

Determin'd his foes to subdue; Thus fies to the bulwarks that sail on the main,

None can equal the courage of true blue.

If our enemies should dare to ineet us once more,

Like lightning to our quarters we'll fly; Like thunder in the air our great guns they shall

roar, Determind to conquer or die. Our officers and tars they are valiant and brave;

Our admirals are loyal and true; They die by theirguns, Britain's rights to maintain,

None can equal the courage of true blue.

If yard-arm and yard-arm alongside of our foes,

Our strong floating batteries should lie;
Ifour enemies should sink and chance down to go,

To our boats then we instantly fly.
In time of distress all assistance we give;

All dangers we eagerly pursue,
Our foes for to save from their wat’ry grave;

None can equal the courage of true blue.

When our prize we have taken, and made our own,

For some port then' we gloriously steer; When the harbour we havegain’d, and arriv'd safe

at home, We give our admirals three cheers. We drink a good health to our kind loving wives,

And each pretty girl that's constant and true; Now this is the way that we spend our lives,

None can equal the courage of true blue.

« ForrigeFortsett »