Sidebilder
PDF

HOLINSHED — JEREMY TAYLOR.

Cottagers by the Way-side.

"The Lords of the soil do unite their small occupying, only to increase a greater proportion of rent; and therefore they either remove, or give license to erect small tenements by the high ways' sides and commons; whereunto in truth, they have no right, and yet out of them also do raise a new commodity." Harrison in the Description of Britain, describes this encroaching upon the way side as " a fault to be found almost in every place, even in the time of our most gracious and sovereign Lady Elizabeth." — Holinshed's Chronicles, vol. 1, p. 189.

Toleration of the Reformed Churches.

"We find that all Christian Churches kept this rule; they kept themselves and others close to the Rule of Faith, and peaceably suffered one another to differ in ceremonies, but suffered no difference amongst their own. They gave liberty to other Churches; and gave laws and no liberty to their own subjects. And at this day the Churches of Geneva, France, Switzerland, Germany, Low Countries, tie all their people to their own laws, but tie up no man's conscience: if he be not persuaded as they are, let him charitably dissent, and leave that Government and adhere to his own communion. If you be not of their mind, they will be served by them that are; they will not trouble your conscience, and you shall not disturb their government."— Jebemy Tayixib.

Weah Consciences. "As for them who have weak and tender consciences, they are in the state of childhood and minority: but then you know that a child is never happy by having his own humour: if you chuse for him, and make him to use it, he hath but one thing to do: but if you put him to please him

self, he is troubled with every thing, and satisfied with nothing."—Jebemy Taylob.

Liberty of Preaching. "Lydeed," says Jebemy Taylob, " if I may freely declare my opinion, I think it were not amiss, if the liberty of making sermons were something more restrained than it is; and that either such persons only were entrusted with the liberty, for whom the church herself may safely be responsive, that is to men learned and pious, and that the other part, the vulgus cleri, should instruct the people out of the fountains of the church and the public stock, till by so long exercise and discipline in the schools of the prophets, they may also be entrusted to minister of their own unto the people. This, I am sure, was the practice of the primitive church, when preaching was as ably and religiously performed as now it is."—Vol. 7, p. 785.

Men who would preach. "Such a scabbed ytche of vaynglory catche they in theyr prechynge, that though all the worlde were the worse for it, and theyr owne lyfe lye thereon, yet wolde they longe to be pulpetyd."—Sib Thomas Mobe's Dialoge, ff. 39.

Images. "Touchynge such textes as these heretyques allege agaynst the worshyppyng of Ymages, very sure am I that St. Austyn, St. Hyerome, St. Basyle, St. Gregory, with so many a godly connynge man as hath ben in Crystes chyrche from the begynnyng hytherto, understode those textes as well as dyd those heretyques; namely, havyng as good wyttes, beyng farre better lerned, usynge in study more dylygence, beynge an hepe to an handfulL, and (which most is of all) havyng (as God by many myracles bereth wytnes) besyde theyr lernyng, the lyght and clerencs of his espe

[graphic][merged small]

COMMON-PLACE BOOK.

JFirst Series.

CHOICE PASSAGES.

COLLECTIONS FOR ENGLISH MANNERS AND LITERATURE.

EDITED

BY HIS SON-IN-LAW,

JOHN WOOD WARTER, B. D.

feeeonD CDition.

LONDON:

LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS.

jnm-r.H Thou Radst Made A General M'rvi ^

OF AM. THE BEST OE Mfvs BEST KNOWLEDGES,
AND KNEW SO MICH AS EVER I.FARN1NO KNEW;
YFT DID IT MAKF THEE TRUST THYSELF THE LESS,

AND LESS PRESUMF. ANB YET WHEN BEING MOv'n

IN PRIVATE TALK TO SPEAK; THOC DIDST BFWRAY

HOW FULLY FRAUGHT THOU WERT WITHIN; AND PROv'u

THAT THOU DIDST KNOW WHA'I EVER WIT COULD SAY.

WHICH »ROW*B THOl* RAMI NOT BOOKS AS MANY KAY I,

FOR OSTENTATION, BIT FOR VIE J AND THAT

THY BOUNTEOUS MEMORY WAS SUCH AS GAVE

A LARGE REVENUE OF THE GOOD IT OAT.

WITNESS- SO MANY VOLUMES, WH-ERFTO TWO!

HAST SET THY NOTES UNDER THY LEARNED HAND.

AND Mark'd THEM WITH THAT PRINT, AS WILL SHOW HOW

THE POINT OE THY CONCEIVING THOUGHTS DID STAND;

THAT NONE WOULD THINK, IE ALL THY LIEF HAD BFFN

Turn'd INTO LEISURE, THOU COUI.DST HAVE ATTAIN*I>

SO MUCH OF TIME, TO HAVE Perus'd AND SEEN

SO MANY VOLUMES THAT SO MUCH CONTAIN'n."

Daniel. Funeral Poem upon the Death of the fate Xohfe Karl <>f Devonshire.—'* Well-languaged Danifl," a* Brownf rails him in his" Britannia's Pastorals," Was on* of Srnttthrp'favonritp Po*»fs.

JOHN WOOD WARTFR

i

[graphic][merged small]
[graphic]

i NEXPECTED and accidental circumstances have entailed upon me the publication of the lamented fe>OUtljCJ?'SS ComMon-place Book. Had it been committed to my hands in the first instance, I should probably have made an arrangement somewhat different;— as it is, I carry out, as far as I am enabled to do, the arrangement which is detailed in the publisher's Prospectus.

I am the Editor of the present volume, complete in itself, from p. 310;—and those who are conversant in literary investigation, will make allowance for such errors as have escaped me. As far as my limited reading, and the resources of a private library, permitted, I have investigated doubtful passages, and have corrected imperfect references. Nothing but reverence for the honoured name of ~5i0Utl)ep would have induced me, with my clerical calls and studies, to have entered upon the work. The difficulty of carrying it out only, shows the wonderful stores, the accumulated learning, and the unlimited research, of the excellently single-hearted, the devout, and gifted Collector. Most truly may it be said of him, in the words of Stephen Hawes, in his " Pastime Of Pleasube,"—speaking of Masteb Lidgate,

"And who his bokes list to hear or see,
In them he shall find Elocution
With as good order as may be,
Keeping full close the moralization
Of the trouthe of his great intencion.
Whose name is registered in remembraunce,
For to endure by long continuance."

« ForrigeFortsett »