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becik, from whieh he took a bit of paper, and un- | “Is Mr. Mercer really unwell, and 'unable to folding it, hold up a lock of silken hair. The Sergeant come?”, saddenly seized the relie and kissed it, and then re. “I have told you the truth, sir,'' was the Corporal's

turned it to tho Corporal, who, without saying a dignified and short reply: 11) 7'it got ayan Glove word, restored it to its old place of safety. ind is to Mr. Porteous asked what was wrong with him ?

Bnt Dick now began to see that the Sergeant The Corporal replied that he did not know, but that

semed to be rather excited, and no longer able to he was feverish he thought, and was certainly conEn talk in his usual slow and measured manner; and so fined to bed.'1'WAT i was tha t

be said to him t ma 29 to fino a BMET TETT “The Sergeant, as you are probably aware," re

"Wait till the morn, Adam, and we'll put at richt marked the minister, signing the paper and returning to gler satisfaction."" VALID PDI TOI2 'I'I ins 2:]“ it to the, Corporal, "has greatly surprised and an

Na, na, Corporal!” replied Adam, "I never like noyed me. He seems quite a changed man changed, ita aff--no à fecht even. What ought to be I fear, for the worse.'' Oh! yes, Mr. Dick," con

o, should be dune when it can sae listen to the minister in reply to a protesting wave of the 7., m:-Ye'll help Katie tae gaither her siller and gear | Corporal's hand, “he is indeed. He has become e begither--it's no muckle atweel and see that her proud and obstinate-very."n a tis it

at Märy, wi' the bird, are pit in a bit hooge near “Meek as a lamb in time of peaco, but bravo as a in varsel! They can fen' on what I'll lea' them, wi' lion in time of war, I can assure you, Mr. Porteous,"

their ain wark tae help. Ye'll stan' their frien I ken, replied the Corporal. *: I ten! And ch, man, when ye hear folk abuse me, “I know better!" said the minister.jpš awu T dinna say a word in my defence! Let gowans grow “Not better than me, sir;"? replied Dick, " for tho' fras my gtive, and birds sing ower't, and God's sun ye have kent him as well as me, perhaps, in shine on't, but let nae angry word, against even an | peace, yet ye didna ken him 'at all in war, and a ezemy, ever be heard frao't, or be conneckit wi' my | truer, better, nobler sodger than Adam Mercer never memory!!!! o ; Lumiting event ind i "furt 117 raised his arms in fight or in prayer; that I'll say

Dick was silent. He felt too much to speak: The before the worl!!!!!!!, Hardtoj till Toy(20' ? sotto

Sageant continued LGie a my boots and shoon “Remember, Corporal, you and I belong to diffeIta Jock Hall. Katie wull tell yeaboot him." # Dilrent churches, and we judge mon differently. We

After al patise, he said " I ask forgiveness of must have discipline. Some churches are more or cette minister, if I hae wranged him in ignorance." less pure, according as " de Putas' to Smellie-un and the Sergeant turned his «There's nae kirk pure; wi' your leave, neither

al sway. “The heart, Corporal," he added, " is yours nor mine!" exclaimed the Corporal. «I'm

and! I'm no fit for that yet. God forgie me! but no pure, and accordingly when I joined my kirk e gatra ti’oot hypocrisy gay181041) 3 0 " it was pure dae langer; and, wi' al respec' to you,

"Il no let ye speak another word, Adam!" said sir, I'm no sure if yoúr lain kirk Wasna fashed will

2012" Trust me ag to yer will. Tll be faithfu’ the same diffecculty when ye joined it."" Birmy By rector death !" and her drew himself up, and saluted * Discipline, I say, must be maintained must be,".

ergeant, placing his hand on his heart. 24 said Mr. Porteous; "and Adam has come under it

Muere was not a bit of the conscious dramatic in most deservedly. First pare, then peaceable." I has 28; but he wished to accept the trust given him in '""If ever a man kept discipline in a regiment, hc

ftus forts, 18 became a soldier receiving important did! My certes !” said Dick, "I wad like to see tho orders from a dying friend! Tive Hinwirts Abertos a man wad raggle the regiment when he was in't!"'T

Adem did not hko to confess it; but he was so "I am talking of church discipline, sir!" said the
Pried that he could speak no more without pain, minister, rather irate. * Church discipline, you oh-
El so, thanking the Corporal, he turned round to serve; which-as I deny your being in a properly
en rii) ist borilay"! ! Dil constituted church, but a mere self-constituted

is ut, tu tikumad "ADA ?" gect-you cannot have.
CHAP. XI.- CORPORAL DICK AT THE MANSE.

| "We're a kin'o' volunteers, I suppose?" interrupted ADAM had received his pension-paper, which re- Dick with a laugh ; "the Haldaneite volunteers, as ye quired to be signed by the parish minister, as certify- | wad ca' us; but maybe after a we'll fecht agin the ng that the claimant was in life. Dick was glad of enemy, an' its three corps of the deevil, the world, Bus Opportunity of calling upon the minister to and the flesh, as woel as your ain can do," ottain for his friend the required signature. He “They are not the regular army anyhow,” said

is known to 3r. Porteous, who had met him once the minister, "and I do not recognise them.” efore in Adam's house, and had attacked him rather " The mair's the pity,” replied the Corporal," for Parily on his Haldaneite principles, the sect being, I consider it a great blin'ness and misfortin' when ae

as he alleged, an uncalled-for opposition to the regular | regiment dislikes anither. An army, minister, is no ! Paraty clergy. Ta

pr a c regiment, but many. There's cavalry and artillory, Ś A few minutes brought Dick to the Mansc. After light troops and heavy troops, field guns and siege a ley words of grecting he presented the Sergeant's guns, and each does its ain wark sae lang as it obeys 1024; Mr. Porteous inquired, with rather a scop- the commander-in-chief, and fechts for the kingdom, local expression on his countenance

| What's the use o' fechtin' agin each ither ?”.

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Dost thou remember all those marches wearys

- Dinna fash yer thoomb, Adam, about that busi

| noss," said Dick, "Ye deserved to hae been drummed Who can forget that midnight, sad and dreary, "When in his grave we laid the noble Moore ! I |

oot o. the regiment I mean the kirkt no your kirk But ere he died our General heard us cheering, tre n or mine, but the kirk o' a' honest and sensible folk,

And saw us charge with vict'ry's flag unfurled; gif ye had swithered aboot that bird. ( I hae had a "And then he slept, without his ever fearing * For British soldiers conquering 'o'er the world!

crack wi' the cratur, and it's jist extraordinar senfrom V'. And then he slept, &c. iii . sible like sae erouse, and canty+it wad, ba like

Rememb'rest thou the bloody Albuhera! I i murder tae thraw a neck like that ble In fac, a bird is The deadly breach in Badajoz's walls 1, 2, mair than a bird when it can speak and sing. 12 Vittoria ! Salamanca! Talavera!. . Bis Thank ye, Corporal," said Adam. : lis ,.77

Till Roncesvalles echoed to our balls! -Ha! how we drove the Frenchmen all before us,

de tip “It's some glamour has come ower the minister," b. As foam is driven before the stormy breeze! Brsaid Diok, I just like what cam awor our Colonel,

We fought right on, with conquering banners o'er us, when he made us charge twa thousand, at Busaco, From Torres Vedras to the Pyrenees., TNI and had, in coorso, tag fa' back on his supports in We fought right on, &c.

stadisgracer no jist in disgrace, for we never cam tao Those days are past, my soldier, old and hoary,

past my soldier, old and hoary, But still the scars are on thy manly Urow; !

Try that nor never wull, I hope +but in confusion." sigar

! We both have shared the danger and the glory,/ I" God's wull be done, auld, comrade!roplied...! Come, let us share the peace and comfort now.. Adam ; but it's His wull, I think, that I maun fa!!! Come to my home, for thou hast not another, on the field, and if 60,1 I'm no feared a nal: And dry those tears, for thou shalt beg no more; There, take this hand, and let us märch together 1.LKU BU sougeny Wald ukoo, ondu har Down to the grave, where life's campaign is o'er. ness.". Trovy, T ir? 15 YIL,' fra

i r There, take this hand, &c.* I till. I. Ye're speakin' ower muckle, interrupted Dicky While the song was being sung the Sergeant "and wearyin' yersel'."' yaratis ti ori.' turned his head on his pillow away from the Corporal. | "I maun hae my say oot, Corporal, afore the forWhen it was finished, he said, " Come here, Dick." lorn hope marches," continued the Sergeant; and

The Corporal went to the bed, and seized the Ser-J as I was remarkin', and because I dinna want tae be geant's proffered hand.

t i s interrupted wil the affairs o this life, so as to please "That sang will do me mair guid than a'their Him wha has ea'd me to be a sodgor-I maun nak medicine. The guidwife will gie ye half-a-croon for my last wall and testament noo or never, and puir Sandie Tamson." "

Dimit trust you, Dick, mair than a thg lawyers and law Then asking Katie to leave him alone for a few papers i' the worl'."' And he held out his feverish: moments with the Corporal, the Sergeant continued, hand to the Corporal, who gave it a responsive retaining his hand

- F, ļ, ,111 Squeeze...togassout b.) ti turtittit us M''bic! “I'm no ill, my, auld friend ; but I'm no woel-I'm “Ye see, Corporal," said the Sergeant, “I hae i no weel. There's a weight on my mind, and an op- nge fortun' to leave; but I hae laid by something pression aboot me that hauds me doun," it's for my Katie Hand what she has been tae me, Godal

"Dinna gie in, Adam-dinna gie in, wil the help alane kenş!” He paused. w "And then there's weer o' Him that has brocht ye thro'mony a waur fecht," Mary, that I luvoamaist as weel as my Charlie ; and replied the Corporal, as he sat down beside him. then there's the bird. Na, Corporal, dinna blame “D'ye mind the time when yo followed Caingh rup me for speakin' aboot the bird! The Apostle, when the ladder at Badajoz ? and d'ye mind when that aboot to be offered up, ispak abogt his cloaky and glorious fallow Loyd was kill’t at Nivelle! Noo n ae dead cloak was ever dearer to him than the

"Ah, Diek! thae days, man, are by. I'm no leeyin' bird is tae me, because it was, as ye ken, dear what I was,” said the Sergeant. “I'm a pair tae the wee fallow that was my ain flesh and plnid, 1 crippled, wounded veteran, no fit for ony, mair wha is waiting for me. ,Ye mind Charlie P.” Tall service-no even as an elder," he added, with a “Mind Charlie !” exclaimed the Corporal. “Wait, bitter smile.

i

l awee, Adam!” and he brought forth an old pocketI

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book, from which he took a bit of paper, and un- ! "Is Mr. Hercer really unwell, and "unable to folding it, held up a lock of silken häir. The Sergeant LOK OF Sirken hair. The bergeanu' come: ..

come?"

Prvililt ,

ring suddenly seized the relie and kissed it, and then rel “I have told you the truth, sir," was the Corporal's I turned it to the Corporal, who, without saying a dignified and short reply:141, 0; ibi $1! Titusta word, restored it to its old place of safety. "il milo Mr. Porteous asked what was wrong with him?

Bat Dick nov began to see that the Sergeant The Corporal replied that he did not know, but that seemed to be rather excited, and no longer able to he was feverish he thought, and was certainly contalk in his usual slow and measured manner; and so fined to bed.',, Avi in sit voorft *--' ! s?

he said to him an TP Mai Timur fyrir use"[3m “The Sergeant, as you are probably aware," re" "Wait till the morn, Adam, and we'll put 'a'richt marked the minister, signing the paper and returning

to yer satisfaction.' ILI 3 30 11:00 am I? it to the Corporal, "has greatly, surprised and an""Na, na, Corporal!" replied Adam, " I never like noyed me. He seems quite a changed man changed,

pittin' aff-no' a fecht even. What ought to be I fear, for the worse." Oh! yes, Mr. Dick," continued düne, should be dune when it can i gae i listen to the minister in reply to a protesting wave of the me Ye'll help Katie tae gaither hier Hiller and gear Corporal's hand, “he is indeed. He has become thegither it's no muckle atweel.Kuand see that her 1 proud and obstinate--very,"m e ntin and Märy, wi' the bird, are pit in a bit hoose near “Meek ás a lamb in time of peace, but bravo'as a yersel!!They can fen' on what I'll lea' them, wi' lion in time of war, I can assure you, Mr. Porteous," their ain wark tae help. Ye'll stan' their frien -_I ken, replied the Corporal. I ken! And oh,'man, wher' ye hear folk abuse me, “I know better!” said the minister.tq.. IT dinna say a word in my defence! Let gowans grow “Not better than me, sir;"' replied Dick, "efor tho' frae my grave, and birds sing ower't, and God's sun ye have kent him as well asme, perhaps, in shine on't, but let nae angry word, against even an peace, yet ye didna ken him at all in war, and a chemy, ever be heerd frae't, or be conneckit wi' my truer, better, nobler sodger than Adam Mercer never memory!!':'. I'on if: trouby111109 eri [vi'll jord [I" raised his arms in fight or in prayer; that I'll say

Dick was silent. He felt too much to speak. The before the worl!!*** MW A la timp.) A Sergeant continued_ Gie a my boots' and shoon | “Remember, Corporal, you and I belong to diffe. tae Jock Hall. Katie wull tell ye 'aboot him."!! i!!!rent churches, and we judge men differently. We

After a pause, he said I ask forgiveness o must have discipline. Some churches are mord or the minister, if I hae wranged him in ignorance. less pure, according as- " But as to Smellieu" and the Sergeant turned his "There's nae kirk pure, wi' your leave, neither head away.t « The heart, Corporal,” he added, “is yours nor mine!” exclaimed the Corporal. -}<I'm hard! I'm no fit for that yet. God forgie me but no pure, and accordingly when I joined ny kirk I canina ti oot hypocrisy say, 3910T3 1333M" | it was pure nao langer; and, wi' a? Tospec' to you,

"I'll no let ye speak another word, Adam!said sir, I'mi no sure if your lain kirk Wasna fashed wi” Dick. Trust me as to yer will. Tll be faithfu' the same diffeeculty when ye joined it." *in, aOI'. 11 unto death !\" and her drew himself up, and saluted "Discipline, I say, must be maintained-must bc," the Sergeant, placing his hand on his heart. 1, said Mr. Porteous; "and Adam has come under it

There was not a bit of the conscious dramatic in most deservedly. First pare, then peaceable." Will this; but he vished to accept the trust given him in "If ever a man kept discipline in a regiment; he duo form, as becamo a soldier receiving important did! My cértes!” said Dick, “I wad like to see the ordets from a dying friend! TIVE, ia dib. man wad raggle the regiment when he was in't!"1

Adam did not like to confess it; but he was so "I am talking of church discipline, sir!" said the Fenried that he could speak’no more without pain, minister, rather irate. 6 Church discipline, you oband so, thanking the Corporal, he' furned round to 1 serve; which-as I deny your being in a properly sleep.7. ) '17 .ilasi) Il * |

constituted church, but a mere self-constituted right per t ufudbag'ib 247 sect--you cannot have.” CHAP. XI.-CORPORAL DICK AT THE MANSE.

1 “We're a kin'o'volunteers, I suppose?" interrupted Adam had received his pension-paper, which re- Dick with a laugh ; "the Haldaneite volunteers, as ye quired to be signed by the parish minister, as certify: | wad ca' us; but maybe after a' we'll fecht agin the ing that the claimant was in life. Dick was glad of enemy, an' its three corps of the deevil, the world, this opportunity of calling upon the minister to and the Hesh, as weol as your ain can do." obtain for his friend the required signature. He “They are not the regular army anyhow,” said was known to Mr. Porteous, who had met him once the minister, "and I do not recognise them.” before in Adam's house, and had attacked him rather " The mair's the pity," replied the Corporal, " for sharply on his Haldaneite principles, the seet being, I consider it a great blini'nces and misfortin' when ae as he alleged, an uncalled-for opposition to the regular regiment dislikes anither. An army, minister, is no parish clergy. ..

- : | ae regiment, but many. There's cavalry and artillory, A few minutes brought Dick to the Manse. After light troops and heavy troops, field guns and siege a few words of greeting he presented the Sergeant's guns, and each does its ain wark sae lang as it obeys paper; Mr. Porteous inquired, with rather & scop- the commander-in-chief, and fechts for the kingdom, tical expression on his countenance

What's the use o' fechtin' agin each ither 9”.

The minister looked impatiently at his watch. Dick "I tak' it, with all rrespect to you, sir, and to went on to say

madam," said Dick, “that love will aye do what's “In Spain, I can tell ye, we were thankfu' for thae right, and will, therefore, ayo do what's just and mad chiels the guerillas, and muckle gnid they did generous. We may miss fire pointing the gun wi us. Altho' they didna enlist into the 92nd or ony the eye o' justice, but never wi’ the eye o' love. The regular drilled regiment, Scotch or English, the Duke sight is then always clearer anyhow to me. Excuse was thankfu' for thein. Noo, Mr. Porteous, altho' me, Mr. Porteous, if I presume to preach to you. ye think us a sort o' guerillas, let us alane, let us We Haldaneites do a little in that line, tho' we're no alane!-dinna forbid us tho' we dinnn follow your flag, ministers. I'm a plain man that speaks my mind, and but fight the enemy under our ain.”

sin' ye hae gien me liberty to speak, let me ax if ye “Well, well, Dick, we need not argue about it. wad hae killed yon fine bird, that was wee Charlie en My principles are too firm, too long made up, to be wi' yer ain han', minister?” shaken at this time of day by the Haldaneites," said “Ay, and all the birds under heaven!” repiedi Mr. Porteous, rising, and looking out of the window. / Mr. Porteous, “if the law of the Church vequired it."

" Weel, weol!” said Dick. “I'm no wantin' to “I should think so ! and so would I,” added Mix shake your principles, but to keep my ain.”

Thomasina, walking out of the room. · At this stage of the conversation Miss Thomasina: “It wad be a dreich warl' wi’oot a bird in the entered the room, with “I beg pardon," as if search- wuds or in the lifts !” said the Corporal. “Maybe ing for something in the press, but for no other because I'm a Haldaneite, but, wi' a' respect, I think purpose, in her eager curiosity, than to aseertain I wad miss them mair than a the kirk coorts in the what the Corporal was saying, as she knew him to country!" be a friend of the Sergeant's. Her best attention, | “Drop the subject, drop the subject, Mr. Dicki: with her ear placed outside the door, had made out said the minister, impatiently; " you are getting nothing more than that the rather prolonged conver personal.” .

.

. . sation had something to do with the great ecclesias | The Corporal could not see how that was, but he tical question of the passing hour in Drumsylie. I could see that his presence was not desired. So ha

Almost breathless with indignation that any one, rose to depart, saying—"I'm feared I hae bean its especially a Haldaneite, should presume to take the pudent, but, in candid truth, I wasna meanin' to be part of the notorious heretic in the august presence sae. But jist let me say ae word mair; ye'll ala of his great antagonist, she broke in with what was this, that a fool may gie an advice tae a wise nean, intended to be a good-humoured smile, but was, to and this is my advice--the advice o' an auld soliger ordinary observers, a bad-natured grin, saying, "Eh! and a Haldaneite; no muckle worth, ye may thinkMr. Dick, you too stand up for that man--suspended | Dinna hairm Adam Mercer, or ye'll hairm yer best by the Session, and deservedly so-yés, most deservedly frien', yer best elder, and yer best parishoner. I breng 80. Ilim and his starling, forsooth! It's infidelity | pardon for my freedom, sir,” he added, with a dees at the root."

rential bow. The minister returned it stiffly, remarks “It's what?" asked the Corporal, with amazement. ing only that Mr., Dick was ignorant of all the “Infidelity did you say, my lady?".

facts and history of the caso, or he would have The “my lady" rather softened Miss Thomasina, judged otherwise. .. ... stis whoreturned to the charge more softly, saying, “Well, Something, however, of what the Corporal sau it's pride and stubbornness, and that's as bad. But I stuck in the heart of the minister. In hope his illness will be sanctified for changing his heart!” she added, with a sigh, intended to express | CILATTER M D R. SCOTT AND HIS SERTÁST. a very deep concern for his spiritual welfare. . “I hope not, wi' your leave!” replied the Corporal.

The Corporal was obliged, on family or on Halduneille “Not wish his heart changed ?'' exclaimed Miss business, we know not which, to return by the “Hyllor Thomasina

flyer” next morning. As that slow but sure conveys “No!” said Dick, emphatically, “not changed, for anco jolted along the road but two it's a good Christian heart, and, it changed at all, it could not, in the circumstances in which he was wad be changed for the worse." . ;

placed, remain until another journey. “A Christian heart, indeed! a beart that would not So when he left the Manse, he proceeded at once to kill a starling for the sake of the peace of the Session the house of Dr. -Scott, the well-known doctor of and the Kirk! Wonders will never cease!"

the parish, and of a district around it limnited oniy “I hope never,” said Dick, “if that's a wonder. | by the physical endurance of himself and of bus Our Lord never killed in judgment man nor beast ; / brown horse, “Bolus.” When the Corporal calie and I suppose they were both much about as bad the Doctor was absent on one of his constantly rocita then as now; and his servants should imitate his | ring journeys. Being a bachelor, his old servant example, I take it. Ho was love.". .

Eftie received the visitor. She kept the shop as well "But," said Mr. Porteous, chiming in, “ love is all as the house, and was as well known in the parasi very well, no doubt, and ought to be, where possible; as her master. And indeed she was suspected by many but justice must be, love or no love. The one is a to have equal skill, very likely owing to the powerto principle, the other a feeling."

| effects produced by her doses. On learning the absence of the doctor, the Corporal inquired when he or twa o' Spanish flees that they wadna forget in a was expected home?:8.01 fotorell - s hurry-but what's wrang?” she asked once more

* Wha i' the warl' can tell that? Whatna quas- halting in her eloquence.' tion tae spier o me!" exclaimed Effie."

- " That's just what we want tae ken," replied the 1 "I meant no offence," replied the Corporal; “but Corporal, quietly. ' my friend, Sergeant Mercer "?;!.

“I'll tell the Doctor," said Effie. “I think ye said "I beg yer pardon," interrupted Effe; “ I wasna yer name was Dick--Cornal Dick ?" awar ye were a frien' o' the Sergeant's, honest man!! “No, no! not Cornal yet,” replied Dick, smiling, Sne I may tell you that the doctor may bo here in a “ I'm sorry tae say, my braw woman, but Corporal minute, or maybe no till breakfast-time the morn; or only." be may come at twal, at twa, or Gude keng whan! But The epithet “braw" drew down a curtsy from if it's an ordinar' thing ye want for yerselor Adam, I Effie in reply to his « Gude day; ye'll be sure to

can gie't to ye: sic as a scoorin' dose o' sauts or castur- send the Doctor." izle, or rubhard pills, or seena leaf, or even a fleo Dr. Scott, whom Effie represented, was a man of few

blister, or a few draps o' lodamy," . i ! words, who never attempted to explain the philosophy, i The Corporal listened with all respect, and said, if he knew it, of his treatment, but prescribed his doses

"I want nothing for myseľ or Adam; but Dr. Scott as firmly and unfeelingly as the gunner loads his is requested to veesit him on his return hame, or as eannon. He left his patients to choose life or soon after as convenient." riosis

death, apparently as if their choice was a matter of « Convenient!” exclaimed Effie, "" that's no a word indifference to him; yet nevertheless he possessed a kent in Drumsylie for the doctor! He micht as well most feeling heart, revealed not in looks or words, ax the folk if it was convenient for them to hae a but in deeds of patience and self-sacrifice, for son or a dochter at twal hours i' the day or at twal which, from too many, he got little thanks, and less at nicht, on a het day or on a snawy ane; or to axpay, as Effie had more than insinuated. Every one when it was convenient for them to burn their fit, in the parish seemed to have a firm conviction break their leg, or play the mishanter wi' themsels as to the duty of the doctor to visit them, when unwell, efter a fair. Convenient ! Keep us a'! But depen' at all hours, and from all distances, by day or night; on't he'll mak' it convenient to atten! Mr. Mercer, while their duty of consideration for his health was nicht or mornin', sune or early." L i ri dim, and for his pocket singularly procrastinating.

**I am sorry to trouble him, for I am sure he is “I do not grudge," he once said, “to give my pro

inco bothered and fashed," said the Corporal, fessional aid gratis to the poor and needy, and oven i politely. Iliri 'hi

it to others who could pay me if they would ; nay, I I "Fashed !” exclaimed Effie, thankful for the do not grudge in many cases to send à bag of meal

opportunity of expressing syinpathy with her master, to the family, but I think I am entitled, without being and her indignation at his inconsiderate patients; considered greedy, and without my sending for it, to “Naebody kens that but him and me!! Fashed! the get my empty bag returned !”. man haema the life o' a streyed dog or cat! There's The doctor was ever riding to and fro, lis face na a lameter teylor wi' his waik fit, nor a baim wi' a red with winter's cold and summer's heat, nodding sair wame frae eatin' ower mony cruds or grosats, nor oftener on his saddle than at his own fire-side, watchan auld wife hostin' wi' a grew o'cauld, nor a farmer | ing all sorts of cases in farm-houses and lowly efter makin' ower free wi' black puddins and haggis cottages by night, and cantering by dny for miles to when a mart is kill't- but a' maun flee tae the return again to the anxiety and discomforts of the sickdoctor, yam, yam, yammerin', as if he had the poower room. Poor fellow! is it to be wondered at that he

o' life and death! Puir bodie, I could maist greet if was too often tempted to depend on stimulants to | I wasna sae angry, to wauk him in his first sleep in a support his strength and keep up the genial spirits,

winter's nicht to ride aff on auld Bolus--that's his which regular food, rest, and a happy home should decent horse-and for what? Maybe naething! I as- have supplied. But all liked the Doctor, and trusted sure you he has a dirty fleece tao scoor in this him; though, alas! such men as Dr. Mair--herbalists, parish!" Effie stopped, not from want of illustration, vendors of wonderful pills and "saws," bone-setters, but from want of breath.

and the whole race of ignorant and presuming A hard life, a hard life, nae doot;" Temarked quacks, resident or itinerant-could always impose on the Corporal; “but it's his duty, and he's paid | the credulous, and could sell their marvellous cures fort." 1. lit

for such prices as soldom entered poor Scott's * Him!” said Effie, "I wad like tae see the siller; | pocket. as the watchmaker said-The Doctor, quo' he, should The doctor in due time visited Adam. “What's let them pay the debt o nature if they wadna pay his wrong, Sergeant P” was his abrupt question; and he ain debts first. He wasna far wrang. But I was for immediately proceeded to examine tongue and gettin' the Bergeant-what's wrang wi' him? That's pulse, and other signs and symptoms. He then a mani never fashes the doctor or onybody; and he aye prescribed some simple medicino, rather gentler pay, what he gets. But ither folk fash the Sergeant than Effie's; and said little, except that he would -I wiss I had the doctorin' osome othem I ken! | call back soon. The case was at last declared to be Peggs, I wad doctor them! I wad gie them a blister typhoid fever.

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