A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: Much adoe about nothing (2nd ed.)

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Side 46 - Surely he is torn in pieces; and I saw him not since: and if ye take this also from me, and mischief befall him, ye shall bring down my gray hairs with sorrow to the grave.
Side 34 - I have almost forgot the taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts, Cannot once start me.
Side 53 - twould a saint provoke," (Were the last words that poor Narcissa spoke ;} " No, let a charming chintz and Brussels lace Wrap my cold limbs, and shade my lifeless face : One would not, sure, be frightful when one's dead — And — Betty — give this cheek a little red.
Side 321 - Occidentals at the end of the sixteenth century and the beginning of the seventeenth.
Side 39 - For occasion, as it is in the common verse, turneth a bald noddle, after she hath presented her locks in front, and no hold taken : or at least turneth the handle of the bottle first to be received, and after the belly, which is hard to clasp.
Side 261 - Laurence's cell Enter FRIAR LAURENCE, with a basket FRIAR LAURENCE. The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night, Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light, And flecked darkness like a drunkard reels From forth day's path and Titan's fiery wheels.
Side 42 - That skins the vice o' the top. Go to your bosom ; Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know That's like my brother's fault. If it confess A natural guiltiness, such as is his, Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue Against my brother's life. Ang.. She speaks, and 'tis Such sense that my sense breeds with it.
Side 47 - When we mean to build, We first survey the plot, then draw the model ; And when we see the figure of the house, Then must we rate the cost of the erection ; Which if we find outweighs ability, What do we then but draw anew the model In fewer offices, or at least desist To build at all...
Side vii - ... a double sale of their labours, first to the stage, and after to the press, for my own part I here proclaim myself ever faithful in the first, and never guilty of the last.
Side 26 - And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover Sighing like furnace, with a woful ballad Made to his mistress

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