Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

Sir Robert Inglis remarked, that Lord Stanley's speech treated merely of emigration, and not of colonization, and he proceeded to advocate the sending out of colonies, with all the complete framework of society, even to its Church Establishment. Mr. Hume pronounced Lord Stanley's Speech “sound throughout.” The way to make Colonies prosperous, and to promote emigration was, to give them a good government, and to let them have a share in it. Lord Francis Egerton expressed the greatest satisfaction at the discussion, and thanked Mr. Buller for a speech which would convey so much sound information to the country. Lord J. Russell could not give his vote in favour of the Motion, unless he saw more clearly the means by which the great benefits promised could be attained ; and while so much was being done under existing laws, the House should be cautious how it had recourse to new legislation. If the resolution were adopted, would it not be inferred that they did not concur in those means which had been already taken ; and that they had some great plan in contemplation by which the existing evils

and the distresses of the people were to be removed He thought it of importance, however, that Government should diffuse throughout the country the utmost amount of information on the subject, For the present, the House had better leave the matter in the hands of Government; and he looked to the signs of the times with a confident hope that the country was overcoming its difficulties, Sir Howard Douglas ascribed the prevailing distress to foreign competition with British labour; and though he had never listened to an oration with greater pleasure than to Mr. Buller's, he did not entirely agree with it. Mr. Stuart Wortley also partially supported Mr. Buller's views, but was for leaving the matter to Government. Mr. Buller briefly replied, re. marking that Lord Stanley had made out no case against inquiry. After what had taken place, it was contrary to any object he had in view to divide the House; and therefore he begged to withdraw the Motion. Mr. Sharman Crawford assented to that course, and withdrew his Amendment,

[graphic]

CHAPTER IV.

Affairs of India—Discussions in Parliament on Lord Ellenborough's Policy-Mr. Vernon Smith on the 9th of February moves for Papers in the House of Commons, and refers to one of the Governor-General's Proclamations with strong expressions of censure, in which he is supported by Sir R. Inglis, Lord John Russell, and Mr. C. Buller— Lord Ellenborough is vindicated by Sir R. Peel and Mr. Bingham Baring—Lord Clanricarde introduces the same subject in the House of Lords on the 9th of March–His Speech—He moves a resolution of censure—The Duke of Wellington takes up the Defence of Lord Ellenborough—He comments on the Errors of Policy pursued under Lord Auckland–The Proclamations are defended by Lord Colchester, Lord Fitzgerald, and Lord Brougham—Remarks of the Bishops of Llandaff, Nornich, and Chichester—The Resolution is negatived by 83 to 25–A similar Resolution is brought formard on the same day in the House of Commons by Mr. W. Smith–Speeches of Mr. Mangles, Mr. Macaulay, Lord Palmerston, and Lord John Russell, who are ansnered by Mr. Emerson Tennent, Lord Stanley, and Sir R. Peel—The Motion is rejected by 242 to 157—Thanks voted by both Houses to the Army and Fleet for their Services in China— Thanks to Lord Ellenborough and the Officers and Men engaged in the operations in Affghanistan–Moved in the House of Lords by the Duke of Wellington—Interesting Account of the Military Proceedings contained in the Duke's Speech—Lord Auckland seconds the Motion—Speeches of the Marquess of Lansdonne, Lord Fitzgerald, Marquess of Clanricarde, Lord Brougham, and other Peers. The Motion is carried nem. con.—A similar Vote is proposed in the House of Commons by Sir R. Peel in a long Speech descriptive of the various operations in Affghanistan–Lord John Russell gives a qualifted support to the Motion—Mr. Hutt complains of the excesses committed by the British Troops—Sir H. Hardinge vindicates the Army from the Imputations—Mr. Hume moves an Amendment mhich is %. nvithdrann, and Sir R. Peel's Resolutions are agreed to nithout a division—Mr. Roebuck on the 2nd March moves for a Select Committee to enquire into the Causes of the Affghan War— Mr. Hume seconds the Motion—Lord John Russell defends the late Ministry and opposes the Motion—Mr. D'Israeli and Mr. B. Escott support it—Sir R. Peel, nithout approving of the policy of the War, opposes the Motion for a Committee, on the grounds of public policy -joo. of Lord Palmerston, Sir R. Inglis, and other Members —After a Reply by Mr. Roebuck, the Motion is rejected by 189 to 75. To: recentevents and military borough, the Governor-General of : operations in India, and the that country, produced some inpolicy pursued by Lord Ellen- teresting discussions in both

Sir Robert Inglis remarked, that Lord Stanley's speech treated merely of emigration, and not of colonization, and he proceeded to advocate the sending out of colonies, with all the complete framework of society, even to its Church Establishment. Mr. Hume pronounced Lord Stanley's Speech “sound throughout.” The way to make Colonies prosperous, and to promote emigration was, to give them a good government, and to let them have a share in it. Lord Francis Egerton expressed the greatest satisfaction at the discussion, and thanked Mr. Buller for a speech which would convey so much sound information to the country. Lord J. Russell could not give his vote in favour of the Motion, unless he saw more clearly the means by which the great benefits promised could be attained ; and while so much was being done under existing laws, the House should be cautious how it had recourse to new legislation. If the resolution were adopted, would it not be inferred that they did not concur in those means which had been already taken ; and that they had some great plan in contemplation by which the existing evils

and the distresses of the people were to be removed He thought it of importance, however, that Government should diffuse throughout the country the utmost amount of information on the subject. For the present, the House had better leave the matter in the hands of Government; and he looked to the signs of the times with a confident hope that the country was overcoming its difficulties. Sir Howard Douglas ascribed the prevailing distress to foreign competition with British labour; and though he had never listened to an oration with greater pleasure than to Mr. Buller's, he did not entirely agree with it. Mr. Stuart Wortley also partially supported Mr. Buller's views, but was for leaving the matter to Government. Mr. Buller briefly replied, re. marking that Lord Stanley had made out no case against inquiry. After what had taken place, it was contrary to any object he had in view to divide the House; and therefore he begged to withdraw the Motion. Mr. Sharman Crawford assented to that course, and withdrew his Amendment,

CHAPTER IV.

Affairs of India-Discussions in Parliament on Lord Ellenborough's Policy-Mr. Vernon Smith on the 9th of February moves for Papers in the House of Commons, and refers to one of the Governor-General's Proclamations with strong expressions of censure, in myhich he is su ported by Sir R, Inglis, Lord John Russell, and Mr. C. Buller— Lord Ellenborough is vindicated by Sir R. Peel and Mr. Bingham Baring—Lord Clanricarde introduces the same subject in the House of Lords on the 9th of March–His Speech—He moves a resolution of censure—The Duke of Wellington lakes up the Defence of Lord Ellenborough—He comments on the Errors of Policy pursued under Lord Auckland–The Proclamations are defended by Lord Colchester, Lord Fitzgerald, and Lord Brougham—Remarks of the Bishops of Llandaff, Normich, and Chichester—The Resolution is negalived by 83 to 25–A similar Resolution is brought formard on the same day in the House of Commons by Mr. W. Smith-Speeches of Mr. Mangles, Mr. Macaulay, Lord Palmerston, and Lord John Russell, who are ansnered by Mr. Emerson Tennent, Lord Stanley, and Sir R. Peel—The Motion is rejected by 242 to 157–Thanks voted by both Houses to the Army and Fleet for their Services in China– Thanks to Lord Ellenborough and the Qssicers and Men engaged in the operations in Affghanistan—Moved in the House of Lords by the Duke of Wellington-Interesting Account of the Military Proceedings contained in the Duke's Speech—Lord Auckland seconds the Olion—Speeches of the Marquess of Lansdonne, Lord Fitzgerald, Marquess of Clanricarde, Lord Brougham, and other Peers. The Motion is carried nem. con.—A similar Vote is proposed in the House of Commons by Sir R. Peel in a long Speech descriptive of the orious operations in Affghanistan—Lord John Russell gives a qualifted support to the Molton—Mr. Hutt complains of the excesses Committed by the British Troops—Sir H. Hardinge vindicates the Army from the Inputations—Mr. Hume moves an Amendment mohich 13 o nithdrann, and Sir R. Peel's Resolutions are agreed to without a division—Mr. Roebuck on the 2nd March moves for a Select Committee to enquire into the Causes of the Affghan War— Mr. Hume seconds the Motion—Lord John Russell defends the late Ministry and opposes the Motion—Mr. D'Israeli and Mr. B. Escott support it—Sir R. Peel, nithout approving of the policy of the War, opposes the Motion for a Committee, on the grounds of public policy -joo of Lord Palmerston, Sir R. Inglis, and other Members -After a Reply by Mr. Roebuck, the Motion is rejected by 189 to 75.

T. recentevents and military borough, the Governor-General of ; Operations in India, and the that country, produced some inpolicy pursued by Lord Ellen- teresting discussions in both

Sir Robert Inglis remarked, that Lord Stanley's speech treated merely of emigration, and not of colonization, and he proceeded to advocate the sending out of colonies, with all the complete framework of society, even to its Church Establishment. Mr. Hume pronounced Lord Stanley's Speech “sound throughout.” The way to make Colonies prosperous, and to promote emigration was, to give them a good government, and to let them have a share in it. Lord Francis Egerton expressed the greatest satisfaction at the discussion, and thanked Mr. Buller for a speech which would convey so much sound information to the country. Lord J. Russell could not give his vote in favour of the Motion, unless he saw more clearly the means by which the great benefits promised could be attained ; and while so much was being done under existing laws, the House should be cautious how it had recourse to new legislation. If the resolution were adopted, would it not be inferred that they did not concur in those means which had been already taken ; and that they had some great plan in contemplation by which the existing evils

and the distresses of the people were to be removed He thought it of importance, however, that Government should diffuse throughout the country the utmost amount of information on the subject. For the present, the House had better leave the matter in the hands of Government; and he looked to the signs of the times with a confident hope that the country was overcoming its difficulties. Sir Howard Douglas ascribed the prevailing distress to foreign competition with British labour; and though he had never listened to an oration with greater pleasure than to Mr. Buller's, he did not entirely agree with it. Mr. Stuart Wortley also partially supported Mr. Buller's views, but was for leaving the matter to Government. Mr. Buller briefly replied, re. marking that Lord Stanley had made out no case against inquiry. After what had taken place, it was contrary to any object he had in view to divide the House; and therefore he begged to withdraw the Motion. Mr. Sharman Crawford assented to that course, and withdrew his Amendment,

[graphic]
« ForrigeFortsett »