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FINANCE:-The Budget—Speech of the Chancellor of the Exchequer—

Observations of Mr. F. T. Baring, Mr. Hume, Sir Robert Peel, Lord

John Russell, Mr. Stuart Wortley, Lord Howick, and other Members

-Discussions on the National Finances in the House of Lords, brought

on by Lord Monteagle, who moves Resolutions—The Duke of Wel-

lington opposes the Motion, entering into details on the subject—Able

Speech of Lord Brougham on the same side—Lord Monteagle's Reso-

lutions are negatived without a Division. SUGAR DUTIEs.—The Chan-

cellor of the Exchequer moves a renewal of the Duties of the preceding

year—Mr. Cobden remonstrates against the Expenditure incurred for

the Colonies—Mr. Ewart moves an Equalisation of Duties on Foreign

and Colonial Sugars. The Motion is supported by Mr. Brotherton,

Mr. Williers, Mr. Ward, Dr. Bowring, and Mr. Gibson, and opposed by

Mr. James, Mr. Bernal, and Mr. G. Berkeley—On a Division, the Mo-

tion is rejected by 135 to 50—Mr. Hawes moves to reduce the Duty on

Foreign Sugar to 34s.-Mr. Gladstone and Sir Robert Peel oppose the

Proposition, on the ground of its tendency to encourage the Slave-

Trade—Mr. Labouchere argues in favour of the Motion, which is

rejected on a Division, by 203 to 122. Wool, DUTIEs.—Mr. C. Wood

moves for a Committee of the whole House, with a view to their reduc-

tion. He shows the decline of the Trade by Statistical Returns—Sir

Robert Peel alleges the decline of the Revenue as an argument against
the Motion—It is negatived by a large Majority—Removal of the Re-

Education.—The Queen's Answer to the Address moved by Lord Ashley

—the Factory Bill introduced by Sir James Graham—Discussion on the

Second Reading—Objections taken to the Education Clauses—Remarks

of Mr. Ewart, the Earl of Surrey, Mr. Cobden, Sir R. Inglis, Lord John

Russell, Lord Ashley, and Sir James Graham—The Bill passes a Second

Reading—Active Opposition exerted against the Bill out of doors—Ex-

traordinary number of Petitions presented by its opponents—The Go-

vernment introduce modifications into the Bill to obviate the objec-

tions of Dissenters—Sir James Graham explains the alterations, and

makes an earnest Appeal to the House in favour of Education—Lord

John Russell approves of the Amendments—Mr. Roebuck moves a

Resolution, declaring that all plans of State Education should be kept

clear of any specific religious system—He is opposed by Sir James

Graham, who vindicates the plan of the Government, and by Mr. Hawes

—The Resolution is rejected by 156 to 60–Continued and vehement

opposition to the Factory Bill—Immense number of Petitions against

it—The Educational Clauses are abandoned by Government—Sir James

Graham announces their withdrawal—Discussion in the House of Com-

mons on that occasion—Remarks of Wiscount Melbourne in the House

of Lords on the failure of the Factory Bill—Church Extension—Sir

Robert Peel brings forward a plan for augmenting small livings and

endowing Ministers—Detail of the measure—Remarks of Sir R. Inglis,

Lord Dungannon, Mr. Colquhoun, Lord John Russell, Mr. Hume, and

other Members—The motion is carried unanimously. SEEs of BANGoR

AND ST. AsAPH.-Earl Powis introduces a Bill in the House of Lords to

repeal the recent Act for consolidating those Bishoprics—His Speech—

The Duke of Wellington opposes the Motion, which is supported by

the Bishops of Salisbury, Exeter, Bangor, Lord Lyttleton, and Earl

Fitzwilliam ; opposed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Bishops of

London, Lincoln, and Norwich, and Earl of Ripon—The Bill is with-

drawn for the Session. CHURCH of Scotland.—Lord Aberdeen intro-

duces a Bill to remove doubts respecting the admission of Ministers—

His Speech—The Bill is supported by the Earl of Haddington, the Lord

Chancellor, and the Earl of Minto, and opposed by the Earls of Rose-

bery and Burlington, Lords Cottenham, Brougham, and Campbell—

Further discussions on the Bill, which passes the House of Lords with
considerable opposition—Sir J. Graham moves the Second Reading in

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Repeal Agitation in Ireland—Mr. O'Connell resumes his exertions for

Repeal with renewed energy—Formation of the Repeal Association

—Its Constitution and Emblems—Appointment of Repeal Wardens,

and their duties—The Monster Meetings—Speech of Mr. O'Connell

at the Trim Meeting, on the 16th March—Meeting at Mullingar, at-

tended by Roman Catholic Bishops and Clergy–Declaration in favour

of Repeal by Dr. Higgins, Titular Bishop of Ardagh—Proceedings at

other Repeal Meetings—Violent language used on those occasions—

Co-operation of the Press—Efforts of the Nation Newspaper in favour

of Repeal—Publication of Songs and Pieces commemorative of the In-

surrection of 1798—Alarm excited by these Demonstrations in the

public mind–Policy of the Government—Removal of Magistrates im-

plicated in the Repeal Movement from the Commission—Further pro-

gress of the Agitation—The great Tara Meeting on 15th August–

Reason for the selection of this spot for the purpose—Unequivocal lan-

guage of Mr. O'Connell on this occasion—He broaches a plan at the

Repeal Association for the revival of the Irish Parliament—Arbitration

Courts are proposed to supersede the jurisdiction of the Magistracy—

Allusion to the State of Ireland in the Queen's Speech—Mr. O'Connell

vehemently attacks this document, and publishes a counter-manifesto—

Use made of the Temperance Societies—Mr. O'Connell's Harangue in

praise of the Teetotallers—Announcement of a great Repeal Meeting to

be held at Clontarf–The Government takes measures to prevent it.—

A Proclamation is issued on the 7th, prohibiting attendance at the Meet-

ing—Conduct of Mr. O'Connell—He urges the abandonment of the

Meeting, and issues a counter-proclamation—The ground at Clontarf is

occupied on the 8th by a strong military force—A vast concourse takes

place, but no disturbance of the peace—Warrants are issued against

Mr. O'Connell and his Son, and eight other leading Repealers, on

Education.—The Queen's Answer to the Address moved by Lord Ashley

—the Factory Bill introduced by Sir James Graham—Discussion on the

Second Reading—Objections taken to the Education Clauses—Remarks

of Mr. Ewart, the Earl of Surrey, Mr. Cobden, Sir R. Inglis, Lord John

Russell, Lord Ashley, and Sir James Graham—The Bill passes a Second

Reading—Active Opposition exerted against the Bill out of doors—Ex-

traordinary number of Petitions presented by its opponents—The Go-

vernment introduce modifications into the Bill to obviate the objec-

tions of Dissenters—Sir James Graham explains the alterations, and

makes an earnest Appeal to the House in favour of Education—Lord

John Russell approves of the Amendments—Mr. Roebuck moves a

Resolution, declaring that all plans of State Education should be kept

clear of any specific religious system—He is opposed by Sir James

Graham, who vindicates the plan of the Government, and by Mr. Hawes

—The Resolution is rejected by 156 to 60–Continued and vehement

opposition to the Factory Bill—Immense number of Petitions against

it—The Educational Clauses are abandoned by Government—Sir James

Graham announces their withdrawal—Discussion in the House of Com-

mons on that occasion—Remarks of Viscount Melbourne in the House

of Lords on the failure of the Factory Bill—Church Extension—Sir

Robert Peel brings forward a plan for augmenting small livings and

endowing Ministers—Detail of the measure—Remarks of Sir R. Inglis,

Lord Dungannon, Mr. Colquhoun, Lord John Russell, Mr. Hume, and

other Members—The motion is carried unanimously. SEEs of BANGoR

AND ST. AsAPH.-Earl Powis introduces a Bill in the House of Lords to

repeal the recent Act for consolidating those Bishoprics—His Speech—

The Duke of Wellington opposes the Motion, which is supported by

the Bishops of Salisbury, Exeter, Bangor, Lord Lyttleton, and Earl

Fitzwilliam ; opposed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Bishops of

London, Lincoln, and Norwich, and Earl of Ripon—The Bill is with-

drawn for the Session. CHURCH of Scotland.—Lord Aberdeen intro-

duces a Bill to remove doubts respecting the admission of Ministers—

His Speech—The Bill is supported by the Earl of Haddington, the Lord

Chancellor, and the Earl of Minto, and opposed by the Earls of Rose-

bery and Burlington, Lords Cottenham, Brougham, and Campbell—

Further discussions on the Bill, which passes the House of Lords with

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Repeal Agitation in Ireland—Mr. O'Connell resumes his exertions for

Repeal with renewed energy—Formation of the Repeal Association

—Its Constitution and Emblems—Appointment of Repeal Wardens,

and their duties—The Monster Meetings—Speech of Mr. O'Connell

at the Trim Meeting, on the 16th March—Meeting at Mullingar, at-

tended by Roman Catholic Bishops and Clergy–Declaration in favour

of Repeal by Dr. Higgins, Titular Bishop of Ardagh—Proceedings at

Other Repeal Meetings—Violent language used on those occasions—

Co-operation of the Press—Efforts of the Nation Newspaper in favour

of Repeal—Publication of Songs and Pieces commemorative of the In-

Surrection of 1798—Alarm excited by these Demonstrations in the

public mind–Policy of the Government—Removal of Magistrates im-

plicated in the Repeal Movement from the Commission—Further pro-

gress of the Agitation—The great Tara Meeting on 15th August–

Reason for the selection of this spot for the purpose—Unequivocal lan-

guage of Mr. O'Connell on this occasion—He broaches a plan at the

Repeal Association for the revival of the Irish Parliament—Arbitration

Courts are proposed to supersede the jurisdiction of the Magistracy—

Allusion to the State of Ireland in the Queen's Speech—Mr. O'Connell

Wehemently attacks this document, and publishes a counter-manifesto—

Use made of the Temperance Societies—Mr. O'Connell's Harangue in

praise of the Teetotallers—Announcement of a great Repeal Meeting to

he held at Clontarf–The Government takes measures to prevent it.—

A Proclamation is issued on the 7th, prohibiting attendance at the Meet-

ing—Conduct of Mr. O'Connell—He urges the abandonment of the

Meeting, and issues a counter-proclamation—The ground at Clontarf is

occupied on the 8th by a strong military force—A vast concourse takes

place, but no disturbance of the peace—Warrants are issued against

Mr. O'Connell and his Son, and eight other leading Repealers, on

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