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and sentiment demand. In respect to those principles of modulation, in which the power of the voice so essentially consists, we should always remember too, that, as no theory of the passions can teach one to be pathetic, so no description that can be given of the inflection, emphasis, and tones, which accompany emotion, can impart this emotion, or be a substitute for it. No adequate description indeed can be given of the nameless and ever .*. of expression, which real pathos gives to the voice. Precepts here are only subsidiary helps to genius and sensibility. 3. Before any example or exercise is read to the Teacher, it should be studied by the pupil. At the time of reading, he should generally go through, without interruption; and then the teacher should explain any fault, and correct it by the example of his own voice, requiring the parts to be repeated. It would be useful often to inquire why such a modification of voice occurs, in such a place, and how a change of structure would vary the inflection, stress, &c.; in other words to accustom the pupil to paraphrase the meaning conveyed by different expressions of voice; as in the example p. 32 at the close of Rule IV. and p. 43, bottom. When the examples are short, as in all the former part of the work, reference may easily be made to any sentence; and in the long examples, the lines are numbered, on the left hand of the page, to facilitate the reference, after a passage has been read. If an Exercise is read by a class in turn, it would be useful, at least occasionally, to call on two or more of the number to remark on the manner of the reader, proposing corrections, with reasons, before the remarks of the teacher are made. This will render them vigilant and intelligent, in the constant, practical application of theoretic principles; thus leading them to regard a proper management of voice as both an art and a science. 4. When any portion of the Exercises is about to be committed to memory for declamation, the pupil should first study the sentiment carefully, entering as far as possible, into the spirit of the author; then transcribe it in a fair hand; then mark with pencil, the inflections, emphasis, &c. required on different words;–then read it rhetorically to his Teacher, changing his pencil marks as the case may require; and then commit it to memory perfectly, before it is spoken; as any labor of recollection is certainly fatal to freedom, and variety, and force in speaking. In general it were well that the same piece should be subsequently once or more repeated, with a view to adopt the suggestions of the Instructer. For the purpose of improvement in elocution, a piece of four or five minutes, is better than one of fifteen; and more advance may be made, in managing the voice and countenance, by speaking several times, a short speech, though an old one,(if it is done with due care each time to correct what was amiss,) than in speaking many long pieces, however spirited or new, which are but half committed, and in the delivery of which all scope of feeling and adaptation of manner, are frustrated by labor of memory. The attempt to speak with this indolent, halting preparation, is in all respects worse than nothing.

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& KEY OF RIHE TO RICAL NOTATION.
§ KEY of INFLECTION. (e) low.
? – denotes monotone. (ee) low and loud.
: w rising inflection. (...) slow.

* falling inflection. (=) quick.
§ - circumflex. (—) plaintive.

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; KEY of MoDULATION. (|) rhetorical pause.

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CHAP. I. READING : its connexion with good education

- Grammatical reading
Rhetorical reading - - - -
CHAP. II. ART1culation - - - - -
Causes of defective articulation . -
Difficulty of many consonant sounds
Immediate succession of similar sounds
Influence of accent

Tendency to slide over unaccented vowels

Cautions
CHAP. III. INFLECTIONs . - -
Description of Inflections
Classification of Inflections - -
RULE I: Influence of disjunctive or on Inflection
RULE II. Of the Direct Question and its Answer
RULE III. Of Negation opposed to Affirmation

RULE IV. Rising Inflection.—Of the Pause of suspensio

RULE V. Of the influence of Tender Emotion on the voice .

RULE VI. Of the Penultimate Pause . - - Falling Inflection - - - RULE VII. Of the Indirect Question and its Answer

Rule VIII. The language of Authority—of surprise, &c.

Rule. IX. Emphatic succession of particulars

RULE X. Emphatic Repetition RULE XI. Final Pause ". - e - - RULE XII. The Circumflex . - - - CHAP. IV. Accr. NT • - - - - CHAP. V. EMPHAsis - - - - - SECT. 1. Emphatic Stress . . - -

Absolute emphatic Stress - - -
Antithetic or Relative Emphatic Stress
SEct. 2. Emphatic Inflection - -
Emphatic Clause - - - -
Double Emphasis e - - -
CHAP. VI. MoDULATION - -
SECT. 1. Faults of Modulation . •
Monotony - - - - - •
Mechanical Variety -
SEct. 2. Remedies - - - - - -
The spirit of Emphasis to be cultivated

A habit of discrimination as to Tones and Inflection

§EcT. 3. Pitch of voice

Sect. 4. Quantity - -
Rotundity and Fulness
Loudness • . •
Time

Strength of voice depends on good organs of

speech, &c.

i

Page Directions for preserving and strengthening them 54 Rate of utterance . - - - - - . --56 Sect. 5. Compass of Voice - - - - 56 SEct. 6. Rhetorical Pause . - - - - - . 58 SEct. 7. Transition - - - - - - . 60 SEct. 8. Expression . - - - - - ... 61 SEct. 9. Rhetorical Dialogue - - e - - 62 SECT. 10. The Reading of Poetry . . . . . 64 CHAP. VII. GEstur E - - - . . . . . 67 Expression of countenance - - - 67 Attitude - - - - - - - . 68 Faults of Rhetorical Action . - - - - 68 Gesture may want appropriateness and discrimination 68 May be too constant, or violent, or complex, or uniform 70

Mechanical variety - - - - e -
Use of right hand and left . - - - - 73

EXERCISES.
P A R T I.
Preparatory Remarks . . . . . . . . 76
EXERCISES ON ARTICULATION.
Exercise 1. - - - - - - - e - . 78
EXERCISES ON INFLECTION.

Fxercise 2. Disjunctive or . - . . . . . 78 3. Direct Question, &c. . - - - e - 79 Conjunctive or . . - - - - - ... 81 4. Negation opposed to affirmation . - - - 81 - Comparison and contrast . - - - 82 5. Pause of Suspension . - - - - 84 — 6. Tender Emotion - - - - - - 88 — 7. Indirect Question, &c. - - - - - 90 — 8. Language of Authority, Surprise, &c. e . 92 — 9. Emphatic Succession, &c. - - - - 98 — 10. Emphatic Repetition . - - - - - 99

EXERCISES ON EMPHASIS.

Exercise 11–17. Absolute and Relative stress, and Emphatic 101

18.

Inflection - - - - -
Difference between common and Intensive Inflection 110

Exercise 19.

20. 21. — 22. 23. — 24. — 25.

EXERCISES ON MODULATION.
CoMPAss of voice - - - - - - 111
TRANsition - - - - - - 116
The power of Eloquence - - c - 116
Hohenlinden - - - - - - 118
Battle of Waterloo • - - - 119
Negro's Complaint . . . . 120
Marco Bozzaris - - e - e - 122
Extract from Paradise Lost - e - - 123

- ExPREssron - - - Exercise 26. Judah's Speech to Joseph . 27. Joseph disclosing himself .

23, Burial of Sir John Moore . .
— 30. Eve lamenting the loss of Paradise

— 33. Framples from the Bible . .

- * * *
EXERCISES. . . .
P A R T I I
Exercise

Character of Columbus - - Irving.
The Victim - - - Philadelphia Casket.
Conflagration at Rome of an Amphitheatre . Croly.
The African Chief - - - Bryant.
Riches of a poor Barber - . Edinburgh paper.
Burning of the Fame - - JN. Y. Atlas.
Hour of Prayer - - - JMrs. Hemans.
My Mother's Grave - - - - ..Anonym.
A Tale of Waterloo Anonym

28. Death of a friend

31. Soliloquy of Hamlet's Uncle
RHEtoRicAL DIALogue

The righteous never forsaken

To Printers - - - - Fisher Ames.
Washington - - - - - Pierpont.
Miserable case of a Weaver . . Bell's Messenger.
Tomb of Washington

Destruction of the Temple at Jerusalem by fire Millman.

The Charnel so - - . Charleston Courier. oern Edinburgh Review.

Life—a Spanish -
Death and the Drunkard

The Plague in London - - . Rothelan.
The Battle of Borodino - - - -

Shipwreck - - - Fredericksburg Arena.
The Bucket—a Cold water Song - . Woodworth.

Anecdote of Judge Marshal
The first and last Ticket
Death at the Toilet

Sabbath Schools - - Frelinghuysen.
The folly and wickedness of War - - Knoz.
The Warrior - - - . . Harbinger of Peace.
Death of Ashmun - - - JMrs. Sigourney.
Love of Applause - - - Hawes.
Christian Holy - - - - Hawes.
Watch - - - - J. JMason Good.
New social order in America . - - Douglas.
Voluntary Association . - - - Douglas.
Bible Societies . - • e - Douglas.
Christ's entry into Jerusalem . - Cunningham.
Evening Hymn - • e ..Monthly Vis.
Universal Peace - - - . Chalmers.
The Elder's Death Bed - - Prof. Wilson.

New-York Spectator.

Winchester Republican. JManuscript of a Criminal. From the Diary of a Physician.

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