Vermont state papers: being a collection of records and documents, connected with the assumption and establishment of government by the people of Vermont; together with the journal of the Council of Safety, the first constitution, the early journals of the General Assembly, and the laws from the year 1779 to 1786, inclusive. To which are added the Proceedings of the first and second Councils of Censors

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Side 244 - That government is, or ought to be, instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people, nation, or community...
Side 255 - ... to inquire, whether the constitution has been preserved inviolate in every part during the last septenary, including the year of their service, and whether the legislative and executive branches of government have performed their duty as guardians of the people, or assumed to themselves, or exercised other or greater powers than they are entitled to by the constitution...
Side 11 - Hudson's river, and all the lands from the west side of Connecticut river, to the east side of Delaware bay.
Side 245 - ... nor can any man, who is conscientiously scrupulous of bearing arms, be justly compelled thereto, if he will pay such equivalent; nor are the people bound by any law but such as they have in like manner assented to for their common good.
Side 77 - That it be recommended to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs hath been hitherto established, to adopt such government as shall in the opinion of the representatives of the people best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and America in general.
Side 69 - That it be recommended to the respective Assemblies and Conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs has been hitherto established, to adopt such Government as shall, in the opinion of the Representatives of the People, best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular and America in general.
Side 245 - That, in all capital or criminal prosecutions, a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation, to be confronted with the accusers and witnesses, to call for evidence in his favor, and to a speedy trial by an impartial jury of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty ; nor can he be compelled to give evidence against himself...
Side 254 - A school or schools shall be established in each county by the legislature for the convenient instruction of youth, with such salaries to the masters paid by the public as may enable them to instruct youth at low prices: And all useful learning shall be duly encouraged and promoted in one or more universities.
Side 415 - Any officer or soldier who shall begin, excite, cause, or join in, any mutiny or sedition, in...
Side 247 - Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member, but not a second time for the same cause ; and shall have all other powers necessary for a branch of the legislature of a free state.

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