Sidebilder
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

1642.]
His majesty's declaration from York, March 9.

185 " parliaments of both kingdoms, stopped his own “probation; and he wished that the petition might " mouth from any other reply, than to shew his “ be seen and published, and then he believed it

great dislike for reviving the memory thereof. “ would appear no dangerous one, nor a just “ He said, if the rebellion in Ireland, so'odious to ground for the least jealousy or misappre“all Christians, seemed to have been framed and “ hension. “ maintained in England, or to have any counte For Mr. Jermyn, he said, it was well known

nance from hence, he conjured both his houses “ that he was gone from Whitehall, before he re“of parliament, and all his loving subjects what “ ceived the desire of both houses for the restraint

soever, to use all possible means to discover and “ of his servants; neither returned he thither, or “ find such out, that he might join in the most passed over by any warrant granted by him after

exemplary vengeance upon them, that could be “ That time. For the breach of privilege in the “imagined. But, he told them, he must think “ accusation of the lord Kimbolton, and the five “ himself highly and causelessly injured in his “ members of the house of commons, he told “ reputation, if any declaration, action, or expres them, he thought, he had given so ample satis“sion of the Irish rebels ; any letter from the “ faction in his several messages to that purpose, “count Rozetti to the papists, for fasting and “ that it should have been no more pressed against

praying; or from Tristram Whetcomb, of strange “ him; being confident, if the breach of privilege

speeches uttered in Ireland, should beget any “ had been greater than ever had been before “ jealousy or misapprehension in his subjects of his “offered, his acknowledgment and retractation “justice, piety, and affection: it being evident to “ had been greater than ever king had given: be“all understandings, that those mischievous and “ sides the not examining how many of his pri“wicked rebels are not so capable of great advan vileges had been invaded in defence and vin"tage, as by having their false discourses so far “ dication of the other. And therefore he hoped “ believed, as to raise fears and jealousies to the “ his true and earnest protestation in his answer “distraction of this kingdom ; the only way to “ to their order concerning the militia, would so “ their security. He said, he could not express a “ far have satisfied them of his intentions then, “ deeper sense of the sufferings of his poor pro “ that they would no more have entertained any “testant subjects in that kingdom, than he had “ imagination of any other design, than he there “ done in his often messages to both houses ; by expressed. But why the listing so many officers, “ which he had offered, and was still ready, to and entertaining them at Whitehall, should be “ venture his royal person for their redemption ; “ misconstrued, he said, he much marvelled, when “ well knowing, that as he was, in his own inter “it was notoriously known the tumults about “ests, more concerned in them; so he was to “ Westminster were so great, and their demeanour

make a strict account to Almighty God for any so scandalous and seditious, that he had good “ neglect of his duty, or their preservation. cause to suppose his own person, and those of

“ For the manifold attempts to provoke his late “ his wife and children, to be in apparent danger ; “ army, and the army of the Scots, and to raise a « and therefore he had great reason to appoint a “faction in the city of London, and other parts of " guard about him, and to accept the dutiful ten“ the kingdom, if it were said as relating to him, “ der of the services of any of his loving subjects, “ he could not without great indignation suffer which was all he did to the gentlemen of the “ himself to be reproached to have intended the “ inns of court. “ least force, threatening to his parliament; as “For the lord Digby, he assured them in the “the being privy to the bringing up of the army “ word of a king, that he had his warrant to pass “would imply. Whereas, he called God to wit “ the seas, and had left bis court, before ever he “ness, he never had any such thought, or knew “ heard of the vote of the house of commons, or of any such resolution concerning his late army. “ had any cause to imagine that his absence would “ For the petition shewed to him by captain Leg, “have been excepted against. What their adver“ he said, he well remembered the same, and the “ tisements were from Rome, Venice, Paris, and “ occasion of that conference. Captain Leg being “other parts, or what the pope's nuncio solicits “ lately come out of the north, and repairing to “the kings of France or Spain to do, or from what “ him at Whitehall, his majesty asked him of the “ persons such informations come to them, or how “ state of his army; and, after some relation of it, “ the credit and reputation of such persons had “ he told his majesty, that the commanders and “ been sifted and examined, he said, he knew not; “ officers of the army had a mind to petition the “ but was confident, no sober honest man in his “ parliament, as others of his people had done, kingdoms could believe, that he was so des" and shewed him the copy of a petition ; which perate, or so senseless, to entertain such designs, “ he read, and finding it to be very humble, de as would not only bury this his kingdom in sud“ siring the parliament might receive no interrup “ den distraction and ruin, but his own name and “tion in the reformation of the church and state, posterity in perpetual scorn and infamy. And “ to the model of queen Elizabeth's days, his ma Therefore, he said, he could have wished in mat“ jesty told him, that he saw no harm in it; “ ters of so high and tender a nature, wherewith “ whereupon captain Leg replied, that he believed “ the minds of his good subjects must needs be “ all the officers of the army would like it; only, “ startled, all the expressions had been so plain “ he thought, sir Jacob Ashley would be un and easy, that nothing might stick with them “ willing to sign it, out of fear that it might dis “ that reflected upon his majesty ; since they "please him. His majesty then read the petition “ thought fit to publish it at all. “ over again ; and observing nothing in matter or And having now dealt thus plainly and freely “ form he conceived could possibly give just cause “ with them, by way of answer to the particular “ of offence, he delivered it to him again, bidding “grounds of their fears, he said, he hoped, upon a “ him give it to sir Jacob Ashley, for whose satis “ due consideration and weighing of both together, “ faction he writ C. R. upon it, to testify his ap they woald not find the grounds to be of that

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

CG

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

186

Remarks on his majesty's declaration from York, [BOOK V. “ moment to beget, or longer to continue, a mis said, he hoped, would never alter the nature of understanding between them; or force them to parliaments, and the constitution of this king

apply themselves to the use of any other power, “ dom; or invite his subjects so much to abuse “ than what the law had given them : the which “his confidence, as to esteem any thing fit for this “ he always intended should be the measure of his parliament to do, which were not fit, if it were

own power, and expected it should be the rule “ in his power to dissolve it to-morrow. And after “ of his subjects' obedience.

all these, and many other acts of grace on his Concerning his own fears and jealousies, as he part, that he might be sure of a perfect recon“ had no intention of accusing them, so he said, “ ciliation between him and all his subjects, he “ he was sure no words spoken by him on the “had offered, and was still ready to grant, a free “ sudden at Theobalds would bear that interpre “ and general pardon, as ample as themselves « tation. He had said, for his residence near “ should think fit. Now if those were not real

them, he wished it might be so safe and honour expressions of the affections of his soul for the able, that he had no cause to absent himself

public good of this kingdom, he said he must “ from Whitehall; and how that could be a breach " confess that he wanted skill to manifest them.

of privilege of parliament he could not under “ To conclude: although he thought his answer "stand. He said, he had explained his meaning " already full to that point concerning his return “ in his answer at Newmarket, at the presentation “to London, he told them, that he was willing to “ of that declaration, concerning the printed sedi “ declare, that he looked upon it as a matter of so “ tious pamphlets, and sermons, and the great great weight, as with reference to the affairs of "s tumults at Westminster: and he said, he inust “ this kingdom, and to his own inclinations and

appeal to them, and all the world, whether he desires, that if all he could say, or do, could

might not justly suppose himself in danger of “raise a mutual confidence, (the only way, with
“either. And if he were now at Whitehall, he “ God's blessing, to make them all happy,) and,
“ asked them, what security he had, that the like by their encouragement, the laws of the land,
“ should not be again? especially if any delin "and the government of the city of London,

quents of that nature had been apprehended by might recover some life for his security; he
“ the ministers of justice, and had been rescued “would overtake their desires, and be as soon

by the people, and so as yet had escaped un “ with them, as they could wish. And, in the

punished. He told them, if they had not yet mean time, he would be sure that neither the « been informed of the seditious words used in, “ business of Ireland, or any other advantage for « and the circumstances of those tumults, and “this kingdom, should suffer through his default

, “ would appoint some way for the examination of “ or by his absence; he being so far from repent“ them, he would require some of his learned “ ing the acts of his justice and grace, which he “council to attend with such evidence as might “ had already performed to his people, that, he

satisfy them; and till that were done, or some " said, he should, with the same alacrity, be still “ other course should be taken for his security, ready to add such new ones, as might best ad“ he said, they could not with reason wonder, that vance the

peace, honour, and prosperity of this or he intended not to be, where he most desired " nation.” " to be.

They who now read this declaration, and re“ He asked them, whether there could yet want member only the insolent and undutiful expres“ evidence of his hearty and importunate desire to sions in that declaration, to which this was an

join with his parliament, and all his faithful sub- answer, and the more insolent and seditious ac"jects, in defence of the religion and public good tions which preceded, accompanied, and attended “ of the kingdom? Whether he had given them it, may think that the style was not answerable to

other earnest but words, to secure them of the provocation, nor princely enough for such a “those desires ? He told them the very remon- contest; and may believe, that if his majesty had “ strance of the house of commons (published in then expressed himself with more indignation for « November last) of the state of the kingdom what he had suffered, and more resolution, that “ allowed him a more real testimony of his good “ he would no more endure those sufferings," « affections, than words; that remonstrance valued they who were not yet grown to the hardiness o “his acts of grace and justice at so high a rate, avowing the contempt of the king (and most o « that it declared the kingdom to be then a gainer, them having designs to be great

with and by him though it had charged itself

, by bills of subsidies whom they provoked) would sooner have bee « and poll-money, with the levy of six hundred checked, and recovered their loyalty and obed “ thousand pounds, besides the contracting a debt ence. But they again, who consider and remem “ of two hundred and twenty thousand pounds ber that conjuncture of time, the incredible di

more to his subjects of Scotland. He asked advantage his majesty suffered by the misunde “them, whether the bills for the triennial parlia- standing of his going to the house of common “ ment, for relinquishing his title of imposing and by the popular mistake of privilege of parl

upon merchandise, and power of pressing of sol- ment, and consequently of the breach of the “ diers, for the taking away the star-chamber and privileges; and, on the contrary, the great hei “ high-commission courts, for the regulating the and reputation the factious party bad arrived “ council-table, were but words? whether the bills the stratagems they used, and tắe infusions t " for the forests

, the stannary courts, the clerk of made into the people, “ of the king's disinclina " the market, and the taking away the votes of “ to the laws of the land;" and especially,

bishops out of the lords' house, were but words? “ he had consented to all those excellent

Lastly, what greater earnest of his trust, and “ made this parliament (of which the people
“ reliance on his parliament, he could give, than possessed) very unwillingly, and meant to a
o the passing the bill for the continuance of this

"them : that the queen had an irreconci present parliament? the length of which, he “ hatred to the religion professed, and to

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

no

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

66

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

66

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

d

adrest ghee thos Tace, eople

, bir lacrity,

1642.] Petition of the lords and commons presented to the king at York. 187 “ whole nation, and that her power was unques said, they had been very much hindered by his “ tionable : that there was a design to send the majesty's denial to secure them, and the whole

prince beyond the seas, and to marry him to kingdom, by disposing the inilitia as they had

some papist:" above all, (which the principal of “ divers times most humbly petitioned. And yet, them, with wonderful confidence, in all places they said, they had not been altogether negliavowed to be true,) “ that the rebellion in Ireland gent of either, having lately made good proceed

was fomented, and countenanced at least, by the ings in preparing a book of rates, to be passed

queen, that good terms might be got for the “in a bill of tonnage and poundage, and likewise “ catholics in England :" I say, whoever remem “ the most material heads of those humble desires, bers this, and, that though it might be presumed, “ which they intended to make to his majesty for that the exorbitancy of the parliament might be “ the good and contentment of his majesty and very offensive to some sober and discerning men, his people; but none of these could be perfected yet his majesty had no reason to presume of their “ before the kingdom be put in safety, by settling eminent and vehement zeal on his behalf, since he “ the militia : and until his majesty should be saw all those (two or three only excepted) from pleased to concur with his parliament in those whom he might challenge the duty, and faith of necessary things, they held it impossible for his servants usque ad aras, and for whose sake he had majesty to give the world, or his people, such undergone many difficulties, either totally aliened “ satisfaction concerning the fears and jealousies, from his service, and engaged against him, or, like “ which they had expressed, as they hoped his men in a trance, unapplicable to it: he will con majesty had already received touching that exclude that it concerned his majesty, by all gentle ception, which he was pleased to take to Mr. Pym's ness and condescension, to undeceive and recover speech. As for his majesty's fears and doubts, men to their sobriety and understanding, before “ the ground whereof was from seditious pamphlets he could hope to make them apprehensive of their “and sermons, they said, they should be as careful own duty, or the reverence that was due to him ; “ to endeavour the removal (of them], as soon as and therefore, that he was to descend to all pos they should understand what pamphlets and sible arts and means to that purpose, it being very “sermons were by his majesty intended, as they evident, that men would no sooner discern his had been to prevent all dangerous tumults. And princely justice and clemency, than they must be “if any extraordinary concourse of people out of sensible of the indignities which were offered to “ the city to Westminster had the face and show him, and incensed against those who were the “ of tumult and danger, in his majesty's apprehenauthors of them.

sion, it would appear to be caused by his maAnd the truth is, (which I speak knowingly,) at “jesty's denial of such a guard to his parliament, that time, the king's resolution was to shelter him as they might have cause to confide in; and by self wholly under the law; to grant any thing, that taking into Whitehall such a guard for himself, by the law he was obliged to grant; and to deny as gave just cause of jealousy to the parliament, what by the law was in his own power, and which “and of terror and offence to his people. They he found inconvenient to consent to; and to op told him, they sought nothing but his majesty's pose and punish any extravagant attempt by the “honour, and the peace and prosperity of his force and power of the law, presuming that the kingdoms; and that they were heartily sorry king and the law together would have been strong they had such plentiful matter (for) an answer to enough for any encounter that could happen; and “ that question, whether his majesty had violated that the law was so sensible a thing, that the - their laws? They besought his majesty to repeople would easily perceive who endeavoured to “ member, that the government of this kingdom, preserve, and who to suppress it, and dispose them as it was, in a great part, managed by his miselves accordingly.

“ nisters before the beginning of this parliament, The day before this answer of his majesty came consisted of many continued and multiplied acts to them, though they knew they should speedily - of violation of laws; the wounds whereof were receive it, lest somewhat in it might answer, and scarcely healed, when the extremity of all those so prevent some other scandals they had a mind to “ violations was far exceeded by the late strange lay to his majesty's charge, they sent a petition to

" and unheard of breach of their laws in the achim, in the name of the lords and commons, upon

“ cusation of the lord Kimbolton, and the five occasion of the short cursory speech he made to “ members of the commons' house, and in the their committee, (which is before mentioned,) at “ proceedings thereupon; for which they had yet the delivery of their declaration at Newmarket, in “ received no full satisfaction, which they told him,

To his majesty's next question, whether he had “ That the lords and commons in parliament “ denied any bill for the ease and security of his “ could not conceive, that that declaration, which subjects ? they wished they could stop in the he received from them at Newmarket, was such “ midst of their answer; that with much thankful

did deserve that censure his majesty was ness they acknowledged, that his majesty had pleased to lay upon them in that speech, which “passed many good bills full of contentment and “his majesty made to their committee; their advantage to his people : but truth and neces

address therein, being accompanied with plain sity enforced them to add this, that, even in or ness, humility, and faithfulness, they thought “ about the time of passing those bills, some de

more proper for the removing the distraction of sign or other had been on foot, which, if it “the kingdom, than if they had then proceeded “had taken effect, would not only have de

according to his message of the twentieth of “ prived them of the fruit of those bills, but have

January; by which he was pleased to desire, “ reduced them to a worse condition of confusion, “ that they would declare, what they intended to “than that wherein the parliament found them. “ do for his majesty, and what they expected to “ And if his majesty had asked them the third “ be done for themselves; in both which, they “question intimated in that speech, what they

[ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

, ané z

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

the se of MC

as

ilege di

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

's disine

speciali;

ercelló

he perzih

meant to ifravni d, and t

66

66

[ocr errors]

it is.

[ocr errors]

none.

[ocr errors]

66

66

188

The king's answer to the petition presented to him at York. (BOOK V. “had done for him ? they told him, their answer “ been long in coming,) we believe, you would “ would have been much more easy; that they had “ have saved yourselves the labour of saying much

paid two armies with which the kingdom was “ of this message. And we could wish, that our “ þurdened the last year, and had undergone the “ privileges on all parts were so stated, that this

charge of the war in Ireland at this time, when, way of correspondency might be preserved with “ through many other excessive charges and pres “ that freedom, which hath been used of old. For “sures, whereby his subjects had been exhausted, we must tell you, that if you may

ask

any thing “and the stock of the kingdom very much di- “ of us by message, or petition, and in what “ minished; which great inischiefs, and the charges language (how unusual soever) you think fit;

thereupon ensuing, had been occasioned by the and we must neither deny the thing you ask, “ evil counsels so powerful with his majesty, and nor give a reason why we cannot grant it, with“ would cost this kingdom more than two millions; out being taxed of breaking your privileges, or “ all which, in justice, ought to have been borne “ being counselled by those, who are enemies to “ by his majesty

the peace of the kingdom, and favourers of the As for that free and general pardon his “ Irish rebellion, (for we have seen your printed majesty had been pleased to offer, they said, it“ votes upon our message from Huntington,) you “could be no security to their fears and jealousies, “ will reduce all our answers hereafter into a “ for which his majesty seemed to propound it; “very little room; in plain English, it is to take “ because they arose not from any guilt of their “ away the freedom of our vote; which, were we

own actions, but from the evil designs and at “ but a subject, were high injustice; but being tempts of others.

your king, we leave all the world to judge what • To that their humble answer to that speech, they desire to add an information, which they “ Is this the way to compose all misunderstandlately received from the deputy governor of the “ ings ? we thought we shewed you one, by our “ merchant adventurers at Rotterdam in Holland, “ message of the twentieth of January; if you " that an unknown person, appertaining to the “have a better or readier, we shall willingly “ lord Digby, did lately solicit one James Henly, a hearken to it, for hitherto you have shewed us “ mariner, to go to Elsinore, and to take charge

But why the refusal to consent to your “ of a ship in the fleet of the king of Denmark, “order, which you call a denial of the militia, “ there prepared; which he should conduct to “ should be any interruption to it, we cannot un“ Hull. In which fleet likewise, he said, a great “ derstand. For the militia, which we always

army was to be transported: and although they " thought necessary to be settled, we never denied

were not apt to give credit to informations of " the thing (as we told you in our answer of the “ that nature, yet they could not altogether think ' twenty-eighth of January) to the petition of the “it fit to be neglected; but that it might justly “ house of commons; for we accepted the persons, “add somewhat to the weight of their fears and * except for corporations; we only denied the way.

jealousies, considering with what circumstances “You ask it by way of ordinance, and with such a “ it was accompanied; with the lord Digby's pre preface, as we can neither with justice to our “ cedent expressions in his letter to her majesty, honour or innocency consent to. You exclude “ and sir Lewis Dives; and his majesty's suc us from any power in the disposition or ex

ceeding course of withdrawing himself north “ecution of it together with you, and for a time “ ward from his parliament, in a manner very

utterly unlimited.

We tell you, we would “ suitable and correspondent to that evil counsel; “ have the thing done; allow the persons, with “ which, they doubted, would make much deeper “ that exception; desire a bill, the only old way of

impression in the generality of his people: and imposing on our subjects: we are extremely un“ therefore they most humbly advised, and be “ satisfied what an ordinance is, but well satisfied,

sought his majesty, for the procuring and settling “ that without our consent it is nothing, not bind“ the confidence of his parliament and all his “ ing: and it is evident by the long time spent in

subjects, and for the other important reasons “ this argument, the necessity and danger was not

concerning the recovery of Ireland, and securing so imminent, but a bill might have been pre“ this kingdom, which had been formerly presented pared; which if it shall yet be done, with that “ to him, he would be graciously pleased, with all “due regard to us, and care of our people, in the “convenient speed, to return to those parts, and “ limitation of the power and other circumstances, “ to close with the counsel and desire of his par we shall recede from nothing we formerly ex“liament; where he should find their dutiful “ pressed in that answer to your order; otherwise, “ affections and endeavours ready to attend his “ we must declare to all the world, that we are not

majesty with such entertainment, as should not “ satisfied with, or shall ever allow our subjects to only give him just cause of security in their “ be bound by, your printed votes of the fifteenth

faithfulness, but other manifold evidences of “ or sixteenth of this month ; or that, under pre“ their earnest intentions, and endeavours to ad “ tence of declaring what the law of the land is,

vance his majesty's service, honour, and con you shall, without us, make a new law, which is tentment; and to establish it upon the sure plainly the case of the militia : and what is this foundation of the peace and prosperity of all his “ but to introduce an arbitrary way of governkingdoms.”

~ ment ? This, which they called a petition, being pre Concerning Pym's speech, you will have found, sented to the king, his majesty immediately re by what the lord Compton and Mr. Baynton turned, by the same messengers, his answer in these brought from us in answer to that message they words:

brought to us, [that,] as yet, we rest nothing “ If you would have had the patience to have “ satisfied in that particular. expected our answer to your last declaration, “ As for the seditious pamphlets and sermons, “ (which, considering the nature of it, hath not we are both sorry and ashamed (in so great a

66

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small]

to any

[ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

1642.] The king's answer to the petition presented to him at York.

199 variety, and in which our rights, honour, and world, and chiefly in the eyes of our loving sub

authority are so insolently slighted and vilified, jects, from so notorious and false an imputation “ and in which the dignity and freedom of parlia as this is. ment is so much invaded and violated) it should “We are far from denying what you have done; “ be asked of us to name any. The mentioning of " for we acknowledge the charge our people have “ the Protestation Protested, the Apprentices' Pro “ sustained in keeping the two armies, and in re

testation, To your tents, O Israel, or any other, lieving Ireland ; of which we are so sensible, “ would be too great an excuse for the rest : if you “ that, in regard of those great burdens our people “think them not worth your inquiry, we have “have undergone, we have, and do patiently suffer “ done. But we think it most strange to be told, “ those extreme personal wants, as our predeces“ that our denial of a guard (which we yet never sors have been seldom put to, rather than we

denied, but granted in another manner, and “would press upon them; which we hope in time “ under a command at that time most accustomed " will be considered on your parts. “ in the kingdom,) or the denial of any thing else, “ In our offer of a general pardon, our intent

(which is in our power legally to deny,) which in was to compose and secure the general condition our understanding, of which God hath surely “ of our subjects, conceiving that, in these times of

given us some use, is not fit to be granted, great distractions, the good laws of the land have “ should be any excuse for so dangerous a con “ not been enough observed : but it is a strange

course of people; which, not only in our appre “ world, when princes' proffered favoursare counted

hension, but, we believe, in the interpretation of " reproaches : yet if you like not this our offer, we “ the law itself, hath been always held most tu have done. “ multuous and seditious. And we must wonder, Concerning any discourses of foreign forces,

what, and whence come the instructions and in though we have given you a full answer in ours formations, that those people have, who can so “ to your last declaration, yet we must tell you, we

easily think themselves obliged by the protesta “ have neither so ill an opinion of our own merit, “tion to assemble in such a manner for the defence “ or the affections of our good subjects, as to think “ of privileges, which cannot be so clearly known “ourself in need of any foreign forces to preserve

of them, and so negligently pass over the us from oppression; and we shall not need for consideration and defence of our rights, so bene any other purpose: but are confident, through “ficial and necessary for themselves, and scarce “ God's providence, not to want the good wishes “ unknown to any of them; which by their oaths “ and assistance of the whole kingdom, being re“ of allegiance and supremacy, and even by the “ solved to build upon that sure foundation, the

same protestation, they are at least equally obliged “ law of the land : and we take it very ill, that “ to defend. And what interruptions such kind of “ any general discourses between an unknown per“ assemblies may be to the freedom of future par son and a mariner, or inferences upon letters,

liaments, (if not seasonably discountenanced and “ should be able to prevail in matters so improbable suppressed,) we must advise you to consider; as “ in themselves, and scandalous to us; for which likewise, whether both our rights and powers we cannot but likewise ask reparation, not only may not by such means be usurped, by hands “ for the vindicating of our own honour, but also

not trusted by the constitution of this kingdom. thereby to settle the minds of our subjects, “For our guard, we refer you to our answer to “ whose fears and jealousies would soon vanish, your declaration.

“ were they not fed and maintained by such false By that question of violating your laws, by " and malicious rumours as these. “ which we endeavoured to express our care and “ For our return to our parliament, we have “ resolution to observe them, we did not expect “ given you a full answer in ours to your declarayou would have been invited to have looked back « tion; and you ought to look on us as not gone,

many years, for which you have had so ample “ but driven (we say not by you, yet) from you. reparation; neither looked we to have been re And if it be not so easy for you to make our resiproached with the actions of our ministers then dence in London so safe as we could desire, we

against the laws, whilst we express so great a are and will be contented, that our parliament be zeal for the present defence of them; it being adjourned to such a place, where we may be fitly

our resolution, upon observation of the mischief “ and safely with you. For though we are not “ which then grew by arbitrary power, (though pleased to be at this distance, yet you are not to “ made plausible to us the suggestions of neces expect our presence, until you shall both secure

sity and imminent danger; and take you heed, “ us concerning our just apprehensions of tumul-
you fall not into the same error, upon the same tuary insolences, and likewise give us satisfaction

suggestions,) hereafter to keep the rule ourself, “ for those insupportable and insolent scandals,
“and to our power require the same from all “ that are raised upon us.
“ others. But above all, we must be most sensible " To conclude: as we have or shall not refuse
of what you cast upon us for requital of those any way agreeable to justice or honour, which

good bills, you cannot deny. We have denied - shall be offered to us for the begetting a right
any such design; and as God Almighty must understanding between us; so we are resolved
judge in that point between us, who knows our “ that no straits or necessities, to which we may be
upright intentions at the passing those laws, so driven, shall ever compel us to do that, which
' in the mean time we defy the Devil to prove, “ the reason and understanding that God hath
“ that there was any design (with our knowledge “ given us, and our honour and interest, with

or privity) in or about the time of passing those “ which God hath trusted us for the good of our bills, that, had it taken effect, could have de posterity and kingdoms, shall render unpleasant

prived our subjects of the fruit of them. And " and grievous to us. And we assure you, that “ therefore we demand full reparation in this point, “how meanly soever you are pleased to 'value the “ that we may be cleared in the sight of all the “ discharge of our public duty, we are so conscious

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

66

[ocr errors]

justí i Tone

[ocr errors]

pasitingi and kiri OU, E1

pero only alr

entre at malo

[ocr errors]

SO

[ocr errors]

thing, D time dangaro

[ocr errors]

done,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
« ForrigeFortsett »