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1642.] The parliament petition the king to remove the magazine from Hull. 195
attempts, and secured their persons from being modest, and in a more dutiful dialect than most
accused, or proceeded against by law, they used no petitions delivered to them,) the bringers of the
less severity against all those who presumed to petition were sharply reprehended; two or three
question the justice or prudence of their actions, of them committed to several prisons; the prin-
especially against those, who, following the method cipal gentlemen of the country, who had subscribed
that had done so much hurt, drew the people to and advised it, sent for as delinquents; and
petition for that which they had no mind to grant; charges, and articles of impeachment, drawn up
and in this prosecution they were not less severe against them; and a declaration published,
and vehement, than against the highest treason “ whosoever should henceforth advise or contrive
could be imagined.

“the like petitions, should be proceeded against, Upon the petition mentioned before, that was as enemies to the commonwealth.” So unlike framed in London against their settling the militia, and different were their tempers, and reception of they committed one George Binion, a citizen of those modest addresses, which were for duty and great reputation for wealth and wisdom, and [who] obedience to the laws established, and those which was indeed a very sober man. After he had lain pressed and brought on alteration and innovation. some time in prison, the lords, according to law, But that injustice gave great life and encouragebailed him; but the commons caused him the next ment to their own proselytes; and taught others day to be recommitted, and preferred an impeach- to know that their being innocent would not be ment against him, for no other crime but ad- long easy or safe: and this kind of justice extended

vising and contriving that petition.” The gen- itself in the same measure to their own members, tleman defended himself, " that it was always who opposed their irregular determinations; who, - held, and so publicly declared this parliament, besides the agony and vexation of having the most

to be lawful, in a modest way, to petition for the abstract reason, and confessed law, rejected, and removal or prevention of any grievance: that he overruled with contempt and noise, were liable to

observing very many petitions to be delivered, all the personal reproaches and discountenance, “ and received, for the settling the militia in an that the pride and petulancy of the other party “ other way than was then agreeable to the law, could lay upon them; and were sometimes im

or had been practised, and conceiving that the prisoned and disgraced, for freely speaking their
same would prove very prejudicial to the city of opinions and conscience in debate.
London, of which he was a member, he had All sorts of men being thus terrified, the com-
joined with many other citizens, of known ability mons remembered, that a great magazine of the
“and integrity, in a petition against so great an king's ammunition lay still at Hull; and though

inconvenience; which he presumed was lawful that town was in the custody of a confident of “ for him to do." How reasonable soever this their own, yet they were not willing to venture so defence was, the house of peers adjudged him great a treasure so near the king, who continued

to be disfranchised, and incapable of any office at York, with a great resort of persons of honour “ in the city; to be committed to the common and quality from all parts; and therefore they

gaol of Colchester,” (for his reputation was resolved, under pretence of supplying Ireland, to so great in London, that they would not trust remove it speedily from thence; and to that purhim in a city prison,) and fined him three thousand pose moved the lords, “ to join with them in an pounds.

« order to that purpose.

The lords, who proAbout the same time, at the general assizes in ceeded with less fury, and more formality, desired, Kent, the justices of peace, and principal gentle “ that it might be done with the king's consent.” men of that county, prepared a petition to be pre- After a long debate, the one thinking they merited sented to the two houses, with a desire, " that much by that civility, the other contented to “ the militia might not be otherwise exercised in gratify those in the ceremony, who, they knew, “ that county, than the known law permitted: and would in the end concur with them, a petition “ that the Book of Common-Prayer, established was agreed upon to be sent to his majesty; in

by law, might be observed.” This petition was which, that he might the sooner yield to them communicated by many to their friends, and copies in this matter, they resolved to remember him of thereof sent abroad, before the subscription was that, which, they thought, would reflect on him ready; whereupon the house of peers took notice with the people, and to “move him to take off the of it, as tending to some commotion in Kent; and, - reprieve from the six priests,” which is before in the debate, the earl of Bristol taking notice, mentioned. And so they sent their petition to him, " that he had seen a copy of it, and had had some telling him, “ that they found the stores of arms “ conference about it with judge Mallet,” who was “ and ammunition in the tower of London much then judge of assize in Kent, and newly returned “ diminished; and that the necessity for supply of out of his circuit, both the earl and judge, for “his kingdom of Ireland (for which they had been having but seen the petition, were presently com “ issued from thence) daily increased; and that the mitted to the Tower; and a declaration published, “occasion, for which the magazine was placed at “ that none should presume to deliver that, or the “ Hull, was now taken away; and considering it “ like petition to either house.” Notwithstanding “ would be kept at London with less charge, and which, some gentlemen of Kent, with a great more safety, and transported thence with much number of the substantial inhabitants of that more convenience for the service of the kingdom county, came to the city; which, upon the alarum, " of Ireland; they therefore humbly prayed, that was put in arms; strong guards placed at London “ his majesty would be graciously pleased to give bridge, where the petitioners were disarmed, and “ leave, that the said arms, cannon, and ammunionly some few suffered to pass with their petition “ tion, now in the magazine of Hull, might be to Westminster; the rest forced to return to their “ removed to the Tower of London, according as country. And, upon the delivery thereof to the “ should be directed by both his houses of parliahouse of commons, (though the same was very /" ment. And whereas six priests, then in New

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196 Ilis majesty's answer to the petition concerning the magazine at Hull. (BOOK V.

gate, were condemned to die, and by his majesty “ out of compliment and ceremony, resolving to had been reprieved, they humbly prayed his ma be your own carvers at last. For we must tell jesty to be pleased, that the said reprieves might“ you, if any attempt shall be made or given in “ be taken off

, and the priests executed according “ this matter, without our consent or approbation, to law.” To which petition his majesty imme we shall esteem it as an act of violence against diately returned answer in these words:

us; and declare it to all the world, as the great“ We rather expected, and have done so long, est violation of our right, and breach of our “ that you should have given us an account, why a privilege.

garrison hath been placed in our town of Hull, Concerning the six priests condemned, it is “ without our consent, and soldiers billeted there true, they were reprieved by our warrant, (we]

against law, and express words of the Petition * being informed, that they were, by some restraint, “ of Right, than to be moved, for the avoiding of “ disabled to take the benefit of our former pro“ a needless charge you have put upon yourselves, “ clamation : since that, we have issued out an

to give our consent for the removal of our maga other, for the due execution of the laws against zine and munition, our own proper goods, upon papists; and have most solemnly promised, in

such general reasons as indeed give no satisfac “ the word of a king, never to pardon any priest “ tion to our judgment : and since you have made “ without your consent, which shall be found guilty “ the business of Hull your argument, we would by law; desiring to banish these, having here

gladly be informed, why our own inclination, on “ with sent warrant to that purpose, if, upon

the general rumour of the designs of papists in “ second thoughts, you do not disapprove thereof. “ the northern parts, was not thought sufficient “ But if you think the execution of these persons

ground for us to put a person of honour, fortune, “ so very necessary to the great and pious work of “ and unblemished reputation, into a town and “ reformation, we refer it wholly to you; declaring fort of our own, where our own magazine lay : hereby, that

upon
such
your

resolution signified and yet the same rumour be warrant enough for to the ministers of justice our warrant for their you to commit the same town and fort, without “ reprieve is determined, and the law to have the our consent, to the hands of sir John Hotham,

And now let us ask you, (for we are “ with a power unagreeable to the law of the land,“ willing to husband time, and to despatch as or the liberty of the subject.

“ much as may be under one message; God knows “ And yet of this, in point of right, or privilege, “the distractions of this kingdom want a present “ for sure we are not without privilege too, we remedy,) will there never be a time to offer to, “ have not all this while complained: and being as well as to ask of us? We will propose no “ confident that the place, whatsoever discourse “more particulars to you, having no luck to please, “there is of public or private instructions to the or to be understood by you; take your own time

contrary, shall be speedily given up, if we shall “ for what concerns our particular : but be sure

require it, we shall be contented to dispose our you have an early, speedy care of the public; “ munition there, as we have done in other places, " that is, of the only rule that preserves the pub“ for the public ease and benefit, as, upon particular lic, the law of the land; preserve the dignity

advice, we shall find convenient; though we “ and reverence due to that. It was well said in “ cannot think it fit, or consent, that the whole a speech, made by a private person; it was Mr.

magazine be removed together. But when you Pym's speech against the earl of Strafford, but “shall agree upon such proportions, as shall be “ published by order of the house of commons

held necessary for any particular service, we “ this parliament: the law is that which puts a

shall sign such warrants as shall be agreeable to “ difference betwixt good and evil, betwixt just “ wisdom and reason ; and if any of them be de- “ and unjust. If you take away the law, all things

signed for Ulster, or Lemster, you know well “ will fall into a confusion, every man will become “ the conveyance will be more easy and convenient a law unto himself; which, in the depraved con

from the place they are now in. Yet we must “ dition of human nature, must needs produce tell

you, that if the fears are so great from the “ many great enormities. Lust will become a law, papists at home, or of foreign force, as is pre “ and envy will become a law; covetousness and tended, it seems strange that you make not pro “ ambition will become laws; and what dictates,

vision of arms and munition for defence of this “ what decisions, such laws will produce, may easily “ kingdom, rather than seek to carry any more be discerned. So said that gentleman, and much from hence, without some course taken for

more, very well, in defence of the law, and supply; especially, if you remember your en against arbitrary power. It is worth looking gagement to our Scots subjects, for that pro over, and considering: and if the most zealous portion of arms which is contained in your “ defence of [the] true protestant profession, and treaty. We speak not this, as not thinking the “ the most resolved protection of the law, be the sending of arms to Ireland very necessary, but “most necessary duty of a prince, we cannot be

only for the way of the provision. For you “ lieve this miserable distance and misunderstand“ know what great quantities we have assigned out ing can be long continued between us; we “ of our several stores, which, in due time, we having often and earnestly declared them to be

hope, you will see replenished. For the charge “ the chiefest desires of our soul, and the end and “ of looking to the magazine at Hull, as it was “ rule of all our actions. For Ireland, we have “ undertaken voluntarily by you at first, and, to sufficiently, and we hope satisfactorily, expressed

say no more, unnecessarily; so you may free our to all our good subjects our hearty sense of

good people of that charge, and leave it to us to " that sad business, in our several messages in “ look to, who are the proper owner of it. And “that argument, but especially in our last of “this, we hope, w.ll give you full satisfaction in “ the eighth of this month, concerning our re“ this point, and that ye do not, as you have done “ solution for that service; for the speedy, ho“ in the business of the militia, send this message “ nourable, and full performance whereof, we

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1642.]
His majesty offers to in

person
into Ireland.

197 conjure you to yield all possible assistance and “ his distressed subjects, as he undertook it for present advice."

“ those only ends; to the sincerity of which proThis answer was received with the usual circum “ fession he called God to witness, with this • stances of trouble and discontent, the taxation of “ further assurance, that he would never consent, evil counsellors and malignant persons about the upon whatsoever pretence, to a toleration of king: and that clause about the condemned priests “the popish profession there, or the abolition of exceedingly displeased them; for by the king's “ the laws now in force against popish recusants reference of the matter entirely to them, he had “ in that kingdom. removed the scandal from himself, and laid it at “ His majesty further advertised them, that, totheir doors; and though they were well content, “ wards this work, he intended to raise forthwith, and desirous, that they should have been executed by his commission, in the counties near West by the king's warrant, for taking off his own re Chester, a guard for his own person, (when he prieve, (whereby they should have made him re “should come into Ireland, consisting of two tract an act of his own mercy, and undeniably “ thousand foot, and two hundred horse, which within his own power ; and thereby have lessened “ should be armed at West Chester, from his much of the devotion of that people to him, when magazine at Hull; at which time, he said, all they should have seen him quit his

power

of

pre “the officers and soldiers should take the oaths of serving them in the least degree,) yet, for many supremacy and allegiance; the charge of raising reasons, they were not willing to take that harsh “and paying whereof, he desired the parliament part upon themselves; and so those condemned “ to add to their former undertakings for that war; priests were no more prosecuted, and were much {“ which he would not only well accept, but, if safer under that reference for their execution, than; “ their pay should be found too great a burden to they could have been, at that time, by a pardon “ his good subjects, he would be willing, by the under the great seal of England. For the other “advice of his parliament, to sell, or pawn, any of part of the answer concerning the magazine, it “ his parks, lands, or houses, towards the supplies made no pause with them; but, within few days “ of the service of Ireland. With the addition of after, they sent a warrant to their own governor, “ these levies to the former of English, and Scots, sir John Hotham, to deliver it; and to their own agreed upon in parliament, he said, he hoped so admiral, the earl of Warwick, to transport it to “to appear in that action, that, by the assistance London ; which was, notwithstanding the king's “ of Almighty God, that kingdom, in a short time, inhibition, done accordingly. But they had at might be wholly reduced, and restored to peace, that time another message from the king, which “and some measure of happiness; whereby he was referred to in the last clause of that answer, might cheerfully return, to be welcomed home and came to their hands some few days before, “ with the affections and blessings of all his good that gave them some serious trouble and appre English people. hension; the grounds and reasons of which were “ Towards this good work, he said, as he had these :

“ lately made despatches into Scotland, to quicken The king finding that, notwithstanding all the “ the levies there for Ulster, so he heartily wished, professions and protestations he could make, the “ that his parliament would give all possible expebusiness of Ireland was still unreasonably ob “ dition to those, which they had resolved for jected to him, as if he were not cordial in the Munster and Connaught; and hoped the ensuppressing that rebellion, sent a message to both couragement, which the adventurers, of whose houses :

“ interests he would be always very careful, would “That being grieved at the very soul for the hereby receive, would raise full sums of money “ calamities of his good subjects of Ireland, and “for the doing thereof. He told them, that out

being most tenderly sensible of the false and “s of his earnest desire to remove all occasions, “ scandalous reports dispersed amongst the people “ which did unhappily multiply misunderstandings

concerning the rebellion there ; which not only “ between him and his parliament, he had likewise “ wounded his majesty in honour, but likewise prepared a bill to be offered to them by his

greatly retarded the reducing that unhappy king attorney concerning the militia ; whereby he “dom, and multiplied the distractions at home, “hoped the peace and safety of the kingdom

by weakening the mutual confidence between “ might be fully secured to the general satisfaction “ him and his people : out of his pious zeal to the “ of all men, without violation of his majesty's “ honour of Almighty God, in establishing the “just rights, or prejudice to the liberty of the

true protestant profession in that kingdom, and subject. If this should be thankfully received, “his princely care for the good of all his do- " he said, he should be glad of it ; if refused, he minions, he had firmly resolved to go with all

“ must call God, and all the world, to judge on “ convenient speed into Ireland, to chastise those “ whose part the default was; only he required, if

wicked and detestable rebels, odious to God and “ the bill should be approved of, that if any “ all good men; thereby so to settle the peace of corporation should make their lawful rights ap“ that kingdom, and the security of this, that the pear, they might be reserved to them. He

very name of fears and jealousies might be no “ said, before he would part from England, he more heard of amongst them.

« would take all due care to intrust such persons And he said, as he doubted not but his par “ with such authority in his absence, as he should “ liament would cheerfully give all possible assist “ find to be requisite for the peace and safety of

ance to this good work, so he required them, “ the kingdom, and the happy progress of the
“ and all his loving subjects, to believe, that he parliament.”
“would, upon those considerations, as earnestly They neither before nor after ever received any

pursue that design, not declining any hazard of message from his majesty, that more discomposed “ his person in performing that duty, which he them; and so much the more, because that which

owed to the defence of God's true religion, and gaye them most umbrage could not be publicly and

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198 Answer to the king's message concerning his going into Ireland. [BOOK V. safely avowed by them. For though, to those who “ testant religion in Christendom, and make way had a due reverence to the king's person, and an “ to the execution of that cruel and bloody deimpatient desire, that all misunderstandings might sign of the papists, every where to root out and be composed, they urged,“ the hazard and danger" destroy the reformed religion; as the Irish pa“to his majesty's person, in such an expedition, “ pists had, in a great part, effected in that king“and the increase of jealousies and distractions, “ dom; and, in all likelihood, would quickly be “ that would ensue in this kingdom by his attempted in other places, if the consideration “ absence ;” and to others, as well those who “ of the strength and union of the two nations of from the barbarity, inhumanity, and unheard of “ England and Scotland did not much hinder and cruelty, exercised by the rebels in Ireland upon the discourage the execution of any such design. English protestants, (of which they every day re “ And that they might manifest to his majesty the ceived fresh and bleeding evidence,) had contracted danger and misery, which such a journey and a great animosity against the nation, and were enterprise would produce, they presented to his persuaded that the work of extirpation was not so majesty the reasons of that their humble opinion difficult as in truth it was; as to the adventurers, “ and advice : who had disbursed great sums of money, and had “ His royal person would be subject, not only digested a full assurance of ample recompence, by “ to the casualty of war, but to secret practices confiscations and forfeitures ; "that by this voyage “and conspiracies; especially his majesty con“ of the king a peace would be in a short time tinuing his profession to maintain the protestant “ concluded in that kingdom, to their great dis religion in that kingdom, which the papists were “ advantage and damage;" yet the true reasons, generally bound by their vow to extirpate. which surprised and startled them, were, that here 2. “ It would exceedingly encourage the rebels ; by the managing the war of Ireland would be taken “who did generally profess and declare, that his out of their hands; and so, instead of having a “ majesty did favour and allow their proceedings, nursery for soldiers of their own, which they might “ and that this insurrection was undertaken by the employ as they saw occasion; and a power of rais “ warrant of his commission; and it would make ing what money they pleased in this kingdom under “good their expectation of great advantage, by his that title, which they might dispose, as they found majesty's presence at that time, of so much dismost fit for their affairs; the king would probably “ traction in this kingdom, whereby they might in a short time recover one entire kingdom to his hope the two houses of parliament would be disobedience, by which he might be able to preserve “abled to supply the war there, especially there the peace of the other two. However, working by appearing less necessity of his majesty's journey the several impressions upon the several affections, at that time, by reason of the manifold successes, they found it no difficult thing to persuade, almost “ which God had given against them. an unanimous, aversion from approving the jour 3. “ It would much hinder and impair the means ney; they who usually opposed their advice not whereby the war was to be supported, and inenduring to think of staying in England, where crease the charge of it, and in both these respects the power, at least for a time, would be in them, “make it more insupportable to the subject; and whose government, they knew, would be terrible, this, they said, they could confidently affirm; when his majesty should be in Ireland. And then “ because many of the adventurers, who had althey despatched a magisterial answer to the king, ready subscribed, did, upon the knowledge of in which they told him :

“his majesty's intention, declare their resolution “ That the lords and commons in parliament had “not to pay in their money; and others, very duly considered the message, received from his willing to have subscribed, do now profess the

majesty, concerning his purpose of going into contrary. “ Ireland in his own person to prosecute the war 4. “His majesty's absence must necessarily very “ there, with the bodies of his English subjects, “much interrupt the proceedings of parliament; “ levied, transported, and maintained at their “and deprive his subjects of the benefit of those

charge; which he was pleased to propound to “ further acts of grace and justice, which they

them, not as a matter, wherein he desired the “should humbly expect from his majesty for the “ advice of his parliament, but as already firmly establishing of a perfect union, and mutual con“ resolved on, and forthwith to be put in execu “ fidence between his majesty and his people, and “ tion, by granting out commissions for the levy- |“ procuring and confirming the prosperity and

ing of two thousand foot, and two hundred horse, happiness of both. “ for a guard for his person, when he should come 5. “ It would exceedingly increase the fears and “ into that kingdom; wherein they said, they could jealousies of his people ; and render their doubts

not but, with all reverence and humility to his more probable, of some force intended, by some

majesty, observe, that he had declined his great “ evil councils near his majesty, in opposition of “ council, the parliament, and varied from the usual “the parliament, and favour of the malignant party course of his royal predecessors; that a busi “ of this kingdom.

of so great importance concerning the peace 6. It would bereave his parliament of that ad“ and safety of all his subjects, and wherein they vantage, whereby they were induced to undertake “ have a special interest, by his majesty's promise, “that war, upon his majesty's promise, that it “ and by those great sums, which they had dis “should be managed by their advice; which could

bursed, and for which they stood engaged, should “ not be done, if his majesty, contrary to their “ be concluded, and undertaken, without their ad “ counsels, should undertake to order and govern “ vice; whereupon, they said, they held it their

« it in his own person. duty to declare, that if, at that time, his majesty Upon which, they said, they had resolved, by

should go into Ireland, he would very much en “ the full and concurrent agreement of both houses, “ danger the safety of his royal person and king “ that they could not, with discharge of their duty, “ doms, and of all other states professing the pro “ consent to any levies or raising of soldiers to be

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1642.]
The king's reply to the parliament's answer.

199 “ made by his majesty, for that his itnended expe- preted by them, and the printer was ordered to be “dition into Ireland; or to the payment of any found out and punished, yet did wholly stop that

army, or soldiers there, but such as should be service; and by the no-inquiry, or punishment of

employed and governed according to their advice that boldness, appeared to be done by design; “and direction: and that, if such levies should be his majesty speedily returned this answer : “made by any commission of his majesty's, not “ That he was so troubled, and astonished to

agreed to by both houses of parliament, they “ find that unexpected reception and misunder“ should be forced to interpret the same to be standing of his message concerning his Irish “ raised to the terror of his people, and disturb * journey, that (being so much disappointed of

ance of the public peace; and did hold them “ the approbation and thanks he looked for to that “ selves bound, by the laws of the kingdom, to “ declaration) he had great cause to doubt, whether apply the authority of parliament to suppress “it were in his power to say or do any thing, which

“ would not fall within the like interpretation : but And, they said, they did further most humbly he said, as he had, in that message, called God “ declare, that if his majesty should by ill counsel “ to witness the sincerity of the profession of his “ be persuaded to go, contrary to that advice of his only ends for the undertaking that journey; so

parliament, (which they hoped his majesty would “ he must appeal to all his good subjects, and the

not,) they did not, in that case, hold themselves “ whole world, whether the reasons alleged against “bound to submit to any commissioners, which his “ that journey were of weight to satisfy

his undermajesty should choose; but did resolve to pre standing; or the counsel, presented to dissuade

serve and govern the kingdom, by the counsel “ him from it, were full of that duty, as was like “ and advice of parliament, for his majesty and his “to prevail over his affections. For the resolving

posterity, according to their allegiance, and the “ of so great a business without the advice of his
“ law of the land: wherefore they did most humbly parliament, he said, he must remember, how

pray, and advise his majesty, to desist from that “ often, by his messages, he made the same offer,
“his intended passage into Ireland, and from all “ if they should advise him thereunto; to which -

preparation of men and arms tending thereunto; they never gave him the least answer ; but, in “and to leave the managing of that war to his “ their late declaration, told him, that they were

parliament, according to his promise made unto not to be satisfied with words : so that he had

them, and his commission granted under his great reason to conceive, they rather avoided, out of “ seal of England, by advice of both houses; in regard to his person, to give him counsel to run

prosecution whereof, by God's blessing, they had “.that hazard, than that they disapproved the inalready made a prosperous entrance, by many

“ clination. And, he asked them, what greater defeats of the rebels, whereby they were much “ comfort or security the protestants of Christen“ weakened and disheartened; and had no probable “ dom could receive, than by seeing a protestant

means of subsistence, if the proceedings of the king venture, and engage his person for the two houses were not interrupted by that inter “ defence of that religion, and the suppression of position of his majesty's journey: but they hoped, popery? to which he solemnly protested, in that

upon good grounds, that, within a short time, message, never to grant a toleration, upon what “ without hazard of his person, and so much dan-“ pretence soever, or an abolition of any of the

gerous confusion in his kingdoms, which must “ laws there in force against the professors of it. “peeds ensue, if he should proceed in that resolu And, he said, when he considered the great

tion, they should be enabled fully to vindicate his calamities, and unheard of cruelties, his poor

majesty's right, and authority in that kingdom ; “ protestant subjects in that kingdom had under“ and punish those horrible, outrageous cruelties, gone for the space of near, or full six months ; “ which had been committed in the murdering and “ the growth and increase of the strength of those

spoiling so many of his subjects; and to bring « barbarous rebels ; and the evident probability of “ that realm to such a condition, as might be much foreign supplies, if they were not speedily sup" to the advantage of his majesty and the crown, pressed; the very slow succours hitherto sent “ and the honour of his government, and content

them from hence : that the officers of several “ ment of his people : for the better and more regiments, who had long time been allowed

speedy effecting whereof, they did again renew “ entertainment for that service, had not raised “ their humble desires of his return to his parlia any supply or succour for that kingdom; that ment;

and that he would please to reject all many troops of horse had long lain near Chester “ counsels and apprehensions, which might any untransported; that the lord lieutenant of Ire

way derogate from that faithfulness and allegi land, on whom he relied principally for the conance, which, in truth and sincerity, they had “ duct and managing of affairs there, was still in always borne and professed to his majesty, and “ this kingdom, notwithstanding his majesty's ear

should ever make good, to the uttermost, with “ nestness expressed, that he should repair to his * their lives and fortunes.”

command: and when he considered the many and This petition (the matter whereof finding a gene great scandals raised upon himself by report of ral concurrence, there was the least debate and “ the rebels, and not sufficiently discountenanced contradiction upon the manner of expression) being “ here, notwithstanding so many professions of his sent to the king to York; and, in the mean time, majesty; and had seen a book, lately printed by all preparations being suspended for the necessary

the order of the house of commons, entitled, A relief for Ireland, insomuch as with the votes “ Remonstrance of divers remarkable Passages (which were presently printed) against the king's concerning the Church and Kingdom of Ireland, journey, there was likewise an order printed to dis “ wherein some examinations were set down, (how courage the adventurers from bringing in their “ improbable or impossible soever,) which might money; the which, though it had no approbation “ make an impression in the minds of many of his from either house, and seemed to be angrily inter “weak subjects: and, lastly, when he had duly

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