Murray's English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best Writers ... With a Few Preliminary Observations on the Principles of Good Reading, Improved by the Addition of a Concordant and Synonymising Vocabulary ... Divided, Defined, and Pronounced According to the Principles of John Walker ... Walker's Pronouncing Key, which Governs the Vocabulary, is Prefixed to this Work

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Jacob B. Moore, 1826 - 304 sider
 

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Side 272 - Heaven from all creatures hides the book of Fate, All but the page prescribed, their present state: From brutes what men, from men what spirits know: Or who could suffer being here below? The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day, Had he thy reason, would he skip and play? Pleased to the last, he crops the flowery food, And licks the hand just raised to shed his blood.
Side 272 - Who sees with equal eye, as God of all, A hero perish, or a sparrow fall, Atoms or systems into ruin hurl'd, And now a bubble burst, and now a world.
Side 197 - Boast not thyself of to-morrow ; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth.
Side 257 - Religion ! what treasure untold Resides in that heavenly word ! More precious than silver and gold, Or all that this earth can afford.
Side 233 - Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep.
Side 260 - Ah little think the gay licentious proud, Whom pleasure, power, and affluence surround; They, who their thoughtless hours in giddy mirth, And wanton, often cruel, riot waste; Ah little think they, while they dance along, How many feel, this very moment, death And all the sad variety of pain.
Side 261 - Fairest of stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn, Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere, While day arises, that sweet hour of prime.
Side 153 - And I said, Who art thou, Lord? And he said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. But rise, and stand upon thy feet: for I have appeared unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a minister and a witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of those things in the which I will appear unto thee...
Side 261 - And ye five other wand'ring fires, that move In mystic dance not without song, resound His praise, who out of darkness call'd up light. Air, and ye Elements, the eldest birth Of Nature's womb, that in quaternion run Perpetual circle, multiform, and mix And nourish all things ; let your ceaseless change Vary to our great Maker still new praise.
Side 152 - And now I stand, and am judged for the hope of the promise made of God unto our fathers; unto which promise our twelve tribes, instantly serving God day and night, hope to come; for which hope's sake, King Agrippa I am accused of the Jews.

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