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FELLOW OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS; AND OF THE LINNEAN AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND CORNWALL;

HONORARY MEMBER OF THE PHILOMATHIC SOCIETY OF PARIS ;
OF THE ACADEMIES OF NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA; AND OF ARTS AND
SCIENCES OF CONNECTICUT; OF THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA;

OF THE PHILOSOPHICAL INSTITUTION OF BOSTON;
OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF QUEBEC; AND OF THE PHILOSOPHICAL

SOCIETIES OF YORK, NEWCASTLE, ETC.

“Horum contemplatio multiplicem habet usum. Sunt instar nummorum memorialium, quæ de preteritis globi nostri fatis testantur, ubi omnia silent monumenta historica."--BERGMAN. Med. de Syst. Foss.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

FIRST AMERICAN, FROM THE THIRD LONDON EDITION.

A. H. MALTBY, NEWHAVEN, CONNECTICUT;
(RELFE AND FLETCHER, LONDON.

the Work, and made such corrections and additions as the leisure moments which my professional engagements have allowed me, would permit.

The additional illustrations are both numerous and important, and I trust will be found to enhance the interest of these volumes, without having materially increased their size or price.

My geological collection, consisting of upwards of twenty thousand specimens, from which the subjects for the illustration of the Lectures were selected, was, at the period of the former editions, exhibited at Brighton by the Sussex Literary Institution, as the Mantellian Museum.At that time I had every reason to believe that my collection would be permanently established in Sussex, and serve as the foundation for a County Museum. In that expectation I have, however, been utterly disappointed; for although I would willingly have made any pecuniary sacrifice, to accomplish what appeared to me so desirable an object, yet after the death of my noble and lamented friend, the late Earl of Egremont, the munificent patron of the Institution, the proposed measure was abandoned, and even opposed by many of its

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former supporters. I have therefore, in compliance with the wishes of my scientific friends, disposed of my entire collection to the Trustees of the British Museum.

But although the main object of my labours. has thus been frustrated, and that collection, which would have been of tenfold importance if located in the district from whence it was derived, and whose physical structure it was designed to illustrate, is now broken up, and will be dispersed through the cabinets of our National Institution, yet the most interesting specimens are so unique, and so strikingly distinct from any others hitherto obtained, that they may be referred to with facility, when the gallery of organic remains in the British Museum shall be finally arranged.

I avail myself of this means to record the deep sense of obligation I feel to many excellent friends, for their strenuous and unremitting exertions to prevent the dispersion of my Museum, and establish it on a permanent basis in my native county. And although their efforts have proved unavailing, a time will assuredly come, when their endeavours to promote a taste for scientific knowledge among

the intelligent inhabitants of Sussex, and to direct attention to the investigation of its physical phenomena, will be properly appreciated, and the failure of their attempt to secure to the county a collection so rich in its peculiar fossil and mineral productions, be remembered with regret.

Should Providence allot me life and health, I purpose adding another volume to this Work, under the title of "First LESSONS, or an Introduction to The WONDERS OF GEOLOGY ; being the substance of a series of Lectures, designed for persons wholly unacquainted with the nature of geological investigations.

G. A. M.

CRESCENT LODGE, CLAPHAM COMMON,

May 1, 1839.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

1. Introductory remarks. 2. Importance of geology. 3. Nature of

geology. 4. Harmony between revelation and geology. 5. Extent

of geological epochs. 6. Object of the lectures. 7. Physical struc-

ture of the earth. 8. Geographical distribution of animals and

vegetables. 9. Temperature of the earth. 10. Nature of the crust of

the globe. 11. Composition of the rocks and strata. 12. Classification

of rocks. 13. Primary rocks. 14. Transition strata. 15. Secondary

strata. 16. Tertiary strata. 17. Alluvial deposits. 18. Geological

mutations. 19. Connexion of geology with astronomy. 20. Nebular

theory of the universe. 21. Different states of nebulæ. 22. Formation

of the solar system. 23. Gaseous state of the earth. 24. Geology

illustrated by astronomy.

25. Meteorites. 26. Mrs. Somerville on

meteorites. 27. Origin of meteorites. 28. Existing geological

changes. 29. Effects of streams and rivers. 30. Delta of the Ganges

and Mississippi. 31. Formation of strata. 32. Rippled sand. 33.

Lewes levels. 34. Remains of man in modern alluvium. 35. Peat

bogs. 36. Conversion of peat into coal. 37. Subterranean forests.

38. Geological effects of the sea. 39. Bed of the ocean. 40. Currents

and their effects. 41. Incrusting springs. 42. Incrustations not

petrifactions. 43. Lake of Solfatara. 44. , Marble of Tabreez. 45.

Stalactites and stalagmites. 46. Grotto of Antiparos. 47. Consoli-

dation of sand and loose materials. 48. Destruction of rocks by carbonic

acid. 49. Carbonic acid gas in caverns and wells. 50. Consolidation

of loose strata by iron. 51. Recent formation of marine limestone

in the Bermudas. 52. Fossil human skeletons of Guadaloupe.' 53.

Impressions of human feet in sand-stone. 54. Isle of Ascension.

55. Drifted sand. 56. Sand-flood and recent limestones of Cornwall.

57. Silicious deposits. 58. The Geysers.

59. Hertfordshire con-

glomerate, or pudding-stone. 60. Effects of high temperature. 61.

Volcanic agency. 62. Expansion of rocks by heat. 63. Temple of

Jupiter Serapis. 64. Elevation of the coast of Chili. 65. Lifted sea

beach at Brighton. 66. Elevation of Scandinavia. 67. Retro-

spect..................

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