Speeches of John Philpot Curran, Esq: With a Brief Sketch of the History of Ireland, Volum 1

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Print. and pub. by I. Riley, 1811
 

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Side 236 - ... heaven, seemed to rive the body of the accused, and mark it for the grave, while his voice warned the devoted wretch of woe and death — a death which no innocence can escape, no art elude, no force resist, no antidote prevent. There was an antidote — a juror's oath — but even that adamantine chain that bound the integrity of man to the throne of eternal justice, is solved and melted in the breath that issues from the informer's mouth ; conscience swings from her mooring, and the appalled...
Side 18 - That as men and as Irishmen, as Christians and as protestants, we rejoice in the relaxation of the penal laws against our Roman catholic fellow-subjects, and that we conceive the measure to be fraught with the happiest consequences to the union and prosperity of the inhabitants of Ireland.
Side 3 - Behold the child, by nature's kindly law, Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw : Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight, A little louder, but as empty quite...
Side 229 - In vain for him the officious wife prepares The fire fair-blazing, and the vestment warm, In vain his little children, peeping out Into the mingling storm, demand their sire, With tears of artless innocence. Alas ! Nor wife, nor children, more shall he behold, Nor friends, nor sacred home.
Side 91 - ... advocate of society, therefore — of peace — of domestic liberty — and the lasting union of the two countries — I conjure you to guard the liberty of the press, that great sentinel of the state, that grand detector of public imposture; guard it, because, when it sinks, there sinks with it, in one common grave, the liberty of the subject, and the security of the crown.
Side 91 - ... that memorable period, when the monarch found a servile acquiescence in the ministers of his folly ; when the liberty of the press was trodden under foot ; when venal sheriffs returned packed juries to carry into effect those fatal conspiracies of the few against the many ; when the devoted benches of public justice were filled by some of those foundlings of fortune, who, overwhelmed in the torrent of corruption at an early period, lay at the bottom like drowned bodies, while...
Side 48 - Ireland, discontents, jealousies and suspicions of our Lord the King and his government, and disaffection and disloyalty to the person and government of our said Lord the King, and to raise very dangerous seditions and tumults within...
Side 80 - No matter in what language his doom may have been pronounced ; — no matter what complexion incompatible with freedom, an Indian or an African sun may have burnt upon him ; — no matter in what disastrous battle his liberty may have been cloven down ; — no matter with what solemnities he may have been devoted upon the altar of slavery ; the first moment he touches the sacred soil of Britain, the altar and the god sink together in the dust ; his soul walks abroad in her own majesty ; his body...
Side 335 - At the mouth of two witnesses, or three witnesses, shall he that is worthy of death be put to death; but at the mouth of one witness he shall not be put to death.
Side 17 - MY LORDS AND GENTLEMEN, WE thank you for your noble and spirited, though hitherto ineffectual efforts, in defence of the great constitutional and commercial rights of your country. Go on. The almost unanimous voice of the people is with you ; and in a, free country the voice of the people must prevail. We know our duty to our sovereign, and are loyal. We know our duty to ourselves, and are resolved to be free. We seek for our rights, and no more than our rights ; and, in so just a pursuit, we should...

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