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terms found in different lan- All sensation is properly and tru-

guages

32

ly in the mind

49

Evidence from incidental re- Sensations are not images or re-

marks in writers

33 semblances of objects

50

Further proof from various wri- The connection between the men-

ters on the mind

34 tal and physical change not sus-

Classification of the intellectual ceptible of explanation

states of the mind

35 Of_the meaning and nature of

Perception

52

DIVISION FIRST. Of the primary and secondary

qualities of matter

53

of the secondary qualities of

THE INTELLECT OR UNDERSTAN-

matter

54

DING.

Of the nature of mental powers

or faculties

55

INTELLECTIVE OR INTELLECTUAL

STATES OF THE MIND.

CHAP. III.-THE SENSES OF SMELL

AND TASTE.

PART FIRST.

Nature and importance of the

INTELLECTUAL STATES OF EXTERNAL senses as a source of know-

ORIGIN.

ledge

56

Of the connection of the brain

CHAP. I.-ORIGIN OF KNOWLEDGE IN with sensation and perception 57

GENERAL

Order in which the senses are to

be considered

58

Connection of the mind with the Of the sense and sensation of

material world

36 smell

59

Of the origin or beginnings of Of perceptions of smell in distinc-

knowledge

37 tion from sensations

60

Our first knowledge in general of Of the sense and sensation of

a material or external origin 38 taste

61

Further proof of the beginnings Design and uses of the senses of

of knowledge from external smell and taste

62

causes

39
The same subject further illustra- CHAP. IV.—THE SENSE OF HEARING.
ted

40

Subject illustrated from the case Organ of the sense of hearing 63

of James Mitchell

41 | Nature of sonorous bodies and

Mustration from the case of Cas- the medium of the communica-

42 tion of sound

Of connatural or innate know- Varieties of the sensation of

ledge

43 sound

65

The doctrine of innate knowledge Manner in which we learn the

not susceptible of proof 44

place of sounds

The doctrine tried by the idea of Application of these views to the

a God

art of ventriloquism

67

The discussion of this subject su- Uses of hearing and its connec-

perseded and unnecessary 46 tion with oral language 68

Further remarks on the rise of

knowledge by means of the sen- CHAP. V.-THE SENSE OF TOUCH.

47

Of the sense of touch and its sen-

Chap. II.-SENSATION AND PERCEP- sations in general

69

TION

Idea of externality suggested in

connection with the touch 70

Sensation a simple mental state Origin of the notion of extension,

originating in the senses 48 and of form and figure

71

par Hauser

64

On the sensation of heat and stitution

95

cold

72 Opinions of Locke on the testi-

On the sensation of hardness and

of the senses

softness

73

Of certain indefinite feelings CHAP. VIII.-HABITS OF SENSATION

sometimes ascribed to the

AND PERCEPTION.

touch

74

Relation between the sensation General view of the law of habit

and what is outwardly signified 75 and of its applications

97

Of habit in relation to the smell 98

CHAP. VI.-THE SENSE or sight. Of habit in relation to the taste 99

Of habit in relation to the hear-

Of the organ of sight and the uses ing

100

or benefits of that sense 75 Of certain universal habits based

Statement of the mode or process

on sounds

101

in visual perception

76 Application of habit to the touch 102

Of the original and acquired per- Other striking instances of bab-

ceptions of sight

77 its of touch

103

The idea of extension not origi- Habits considered in relation to

nally from sight

78 the sight

104

Of the knowledge of the figure of Sensations may possess a rela-
bodies by the sight

79 tive, as well as positive in-

Measurements of magnitude by crease of power

105

80 Of habits as modified by partic-

Of objects seen in the mist and ular callings or arts

106

of the sun and moon in the hor- The law of habit considered in

izon

81 reference to the perception

Of the estimation of distances by of the outlines and forms of

sight

82 objects

107

Estimation of distance when un- Notice of some facts which fa-

aided by intermediate objects 83

above doctrine

108

Of objects seen on the ocean, &c. 84 Additional illustrations of Mr.

Supposed feelings of a being call- Stewart's doctrine

109

ed into existence in the full

possession of his powers 85 CHAP. IX.-MUSCULAR HABITS.

CHAP. VII.- :-OF RELIANCE ON THE Instances in proof of the exist-

ence of muscular habits 110

Muscular habits regarded by

By means of sensations we have some writers as involuntary 111

a knowledge of outward things 86 Objections to the doctrine of in-

Objection to a reliance on the

voluntary muscular habits 112

87

The senses circumscribed or lim-

Chap. X.-CONCEPTIONS.

ited rather than fallacious 88

Some alledged mistakes of the Meaning and characteristics of

senses owing to want of care 89

conceptions

113

Of mistakes in judging of the mo- Of conceptions of objects of

tion of objects

sight

114

Of mistakes as to the distances Of the influence of habit on our

and magnitude of objects 91 conceptions

115

The senses liable to be diseased 92 Influence of habit on concep-

On the real existence of a mate- tions of sight

116

rial world

93 Of the subserviency of our con-

Doctrine of the non-existence of

ceptions to description 117

matter considered

94 Of conceptions attended with a

The senses as much grounds of momentary belief

118

belief as other parts of our con- Conceptions which are joined

90

with perceptions

119 sifications

141

Of our conceptions at tragical Of the nature of general ab-

representations

120 stract ideas

142

Objection sometimes made to

CHAP. XI.-SIMPLICITY AND COM-

the existence of general no-

PLEXNESS OF MENTAL STATES. tions

143

The power of general abstrac-

Origin of the distinction of sim-

tion in connection with num-

ple and complex

121 bers, &c.

144

Nature and characteristics of Of general abstract truths or

simple mental states

122 principles

145

Simple mental states not suscep-

of the speculations of philoso-

tible of definition

123 phers and others

146

Simple mental states represen-

of different opinions formerly

tative of a reality

124 prevailing

147

Origin of complex notions and Of the opinions of the Realists 148

their relation to simple 125 Of the opinions of the Nominal-

Supposed complexness without ists

149

the antecedence of simple seel- Of the opinions of the Concep-

ings

126 tualists

150

The precise sense in which Further remarks of Brown on

complexness is to be under- general abstractions

151

stood

127

Illustrations of analysis as ap-

Chap. XIV.-OF ATTENTION.

plied to the mind

128

Complex notions of external or- Of the general nature of atten-

igin

129 tion

152

of objects contemplated as Of different degrees of atten-

wholes

130 tion

253

Something more in external ob- Dependence of memory on at-

jects than mere attributes or tention

154

qualities

131 Of exercising attention in read-

Imperfections of our complex ing

155

notions of external objects 132 Alledged inability to command

the attention

156

CHAP. XII.-ABSTRACTION.

Chap. XV.-DREAMING.

Abstraction implied in the anal-

ysis of complex ideas 133 Definition of dreams and the

Instances of particular abstract prevalence of them

157

ideas

134 Connection of dreams with our

Mental process in separating waking thoughts

158

and abstracting them

135 Dreams are often caused by our

Of generalizations of particular sensations

159

abstract mental states 136 Explanation of the incoherency

Of the importance and uses of of dreams. (1st cause.) 160

abstraction

137 Second cause of the incoheren-

cy of dreams

161

CHAP, XIII.

ABSTRACT Apparent reality of dreams

(1st cause.

162

Apparent reality of dreams

General abstract notions the (2nd cause.)

163

same with genera and species 138 of our estimate of time in

Process in classification or the dreaming

164

forming of genera and species 139 Of the senses sinking to sleep in

Early classifications sometimes succession

165

incorrect

140 General remarks on cases of

Illustration of our earliest clas-

somnambulism

166

Further illustrations of som- Marks or characteristics of time 185

nambulism

167 The idea of space not of exter-

nal origin

186

The idea of space has its origin

DIVISION FIRST.

in suggestion

187

Characteristic marks of the no-

THE INTELLECT OR UNDERSTAN-

188

Of the origin of the idea of pow-

DING.

189

Origin of the idea of the first or

INTELLECTIVE OR INTELLECTUAL

primitive

190

Of the ideas of right and wrong 191

PART SECOND.

Origin of the ideas of moral

merit and demerit

192

Of other elements of knowledge

INTELLECTUAL STATES OF INTERNAL

developed in suggestion 193

CHAP. I.-INTERNAL

Suggestion a source of princi-

ORIGIN

ples as well as of ideas 194

KNOWLEDGE.

Chap. III.-CONSCIOUSNESS.

The soul has fountains of know-

ledge within

168

Consciousness the 2nd source

Declaration of Locke, that the

169

of internal knowledge

soul has knowledge in itself

195

Further remarks on the proper

Opinions of Cudworth on the

subject of internal knowledge 170 objects of consciousness 196

Further remarks of the same

Consciousness a ground or law

writer on this subject

171

of belief

Writers who have objected to

Instances of knowledge devel-

the doctrine of an internal oped in consciousness

198

source of knowledge

172

Knowledge begins in the senses,

Chap. IV.-RELATIVE SUGGESTION

but has internal accessions 173

OR JUDGMENT.

Instances of notions, which have

an internal origin

174 Of the susceptibility of perceiv-

Imperfections attendant

ing or feeling relations

199

classifications in mental phi-

Occasions on which feelings of

losophy

175

relation may arise

200

Of the use of correlative terms 201

CHAP. II.-ORIGINAL SUGGESTION,

Of the great number of our ideas

of relation

202

Import of suggestion, and its ap-

Of relations of identity and di-

plication in Reid and Stew-

versity

203

art

Of axioms in connection with

176

Ideas of existence, mind, self-

relations of identity and di-

existence, and personal iden-

versity

204

tity

177 (II) Relations of degree, and

Origin of the idea of externality 178

names expressive of them 205

Idea of inatter or material ex-

Relations of degree in adjec-

istence

179

tives of the positive form 206

Origin of the idea of motion 180

(III) Of relations of proportion 207

Of the nature of unity and the

(IV) Of relations of place or

origin of that notion

181

position

208

Nature of succession, and ori-

(V) Of relations of time

209

gin of the idea of succession 182 (VI) of relations of possession 210

Origin of the notion of duration 183 (VII) Of relations of cause and

Of time and its measurements,

effect

211

and of eternity

184

Of c

complex terms involving the

on

Of

memory,
CHAP. VI,-ASSOCIATION. (SECON- or that species of memory,
DARY Laws.)

which is based on the rela-

tions of contiguity in time and

Secondary laws and their con- place

246

nection with the primary 224 Illustrations of specific or cir-

Of the influence of lapse of cumstantial memory

247

time

225 Of philosophic memory, or that

Secondary law of repetition or species of memory which is
habit

226 based on other relations than

Of the secondary law of co-ex- those of contiguity

248

istent emotion

227 Further illustrations of philo-

Original difference in the men- sophic memory

249

tal constitution

228 Of that species of memory call-

The foregoing law as applica-

ed intentional recollection 250

ble to the sensibilities

229 Instance illustrative of the pre-

Of association caused by pres- ceding

251

ent objects of perception 230 Remarks on the memory of the

Causes of increased vividness aged

252

in these instances

231 On the compatibility of strong

memory and good judgment 253

CAAP. VII.-CASUAL ASSOCIATIONS. Marks of a good memory 254

(1) INTELLECTUAL.

Directions or rules for the im-

provement of the memory 255

Association sometimes misleads Further directions for the im-
our judgments

232 provement of the memory 256
Casual association in respect to of observance of the truth in
the place of sensation
233 connection with memory

257
Connection of our ideas of ex- Of committing to writing as a
tension and time

233 means of aiding the memory 258

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