The History of the Rise, Progress, and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-trade by the British Parliament, Volum 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808
 

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Thomas Clarkson, an ardent advocate of British Abolition details the road to the Act of the Abolition of the Slave Trade that was passed in 1807. The book orginally published in 1808, highlights his ... Les hele vurderingen

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Side 108 - OH for a lodge in some vast wilderness, Some boundless contiguity of shade, Where rumour of oppression and deceit, Of unsuccessful or successful war Might never reach me more ! My ear is pained, My soul is sick with every day's report Of wrong and outrage with which earth is filled. There is no flesh in man's obdurate heart, It does not feel for man.
Side 386 - Behold, I will raise them out of the place whither ye have sold them, and will return your recompence upon your own head : and I will sell your sons and your daughters into the hand of the children of Judah, and they shall sell them to the Sabeans, to a people far off: for the Lord hath spoken it...
Side 109 - I would not have a slave to till my ground, To carry me, to fan me while I sleep, And tremble when I wake, for all the wealth That sinews bought and sold have ever earn'd.
Side 139 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Side 53 - Lured by the scent Of steaming crowds, of rank disease and death, Behold ! he rushing cuts the briny flood, Swift as the gale can bear the ship along ; And, from the partners of that cruel trade, Which spoils unhappy Guinea of her sons, Demands his share of prey ; demands themselves.
Side 154 - I found, from place to place, this uneasiness return upon me, at times, through the whole visit.
Side 109 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free, They touch our country and their shackles fall.
Side 108 - Lands intersected by a narrow frith Abhor each other. Mountains interposed Make enemies of nations who had else Like kindred drops been mingled into one.
Side 45 - Whereto thus Adam fatherly displeased. "O execrable son so to aspire Above his brethren, to himself assuming Authority usurped, from God not given; He gave us only over beast, fish, fowl Dominion absolute; that right we hold By his donation; but man over men He made not lord; such title to himself Reserving, human left from human free.
Side 152 - I was hired by the year, that it was my master who directed me to do it, and that it was an elderly man, a member of our Society, who bought her; so through weakness I gave way, and wrote...

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