The Force of Prejudice: A Moral Tale, in Two Volumes. ...

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printed (by J. Barfield,) for the author, and to be had of him, 1799
 

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Side 155 - But happy they, the happiest of their kind, Whom gentler stars unite, and in one fate Their hearts, their fortunes, and their beings blend ! 'Tis not the coarser tie of human laws, Unnatural oft, and foreign to the mind, That binds their peace, but harmony itself, Attuning all their passions into love ; Where friendship full exerts her softest power, Perfect esteem enliven'd by desire Ineffable, and sympathy of soul ; Thought meeting thought, and will preventing will, With boundless confidence :...
Side 155 - Tis not the coarser tie of human laws, Unnatural oft, and foreign to the mind, That binds their peace, but harmony itself, Attuning all their passions into love ; Where friendship full exerts her softest power, Perfect esteem enliven'd by desire Ineffable, and sympathy of soul; Thought meeting thought, and will preventing will, With boundless confidence : for nought but Jove Can answer love, and render bliss secure.
Side 199 - What is the world to them, Its pomp, its pleasure, and its nonsense all! Who in each other clasp whatever fair High fancy forms, and lavish hearts can wish; Something than beauty dearer, should they look Or on the mind, or mind-illumin'd face — Truth, goodness, honour, harmony, and love, The richest bounty of indulgent Heaven.
Side 16 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Side xxxiv - I would go fifty miles on foot, for I have not a horse worth riding on, to kiss the hand of that man whose generous heart will give up the reins of his imagination into his author's hands — be pleased he knows not why, and cares not wherefore.
Side 25 - Troubled on every side, yet not distressed ; perplexed, but not in despair ; persecuted, but not forsaken ; cast down, but not destroyed ; always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus.
Side 24 - Framed every tie that binds the heart to prove, Her duty friendship, and her friendship love. But yet, remembering that the parting sigh Appoints the just to slumber, not to die, The starting tear I check'd, — I kiss'd the rod, — And not to earth resign'd her, but to God ! SILENT WORSHIP.
Side 207 - And Hazael said. But what, is thy servant a dog, that he should do this great thing?
Side 76 - Mankind my foes ; and only love to friend : But such a love, kept at such awful distance, As, what it loudly dares to tell a rival, Shall fear to whisper there. Queens may be loved, And so may gods ; else why are altars raised ? Why shines the sun, but that he may be viewed?
Side 174 - And plunge th' exulting maniac in despair. Then O ! with pious fortitude sustain Thy present loss — haply, thy future gain ; Nor let thy Emma die in vain ; Time shall administer its wonted balm, And hush this storm of grief to no unpleasing calm. Thus the poor bird, by some disastrous fate, Caught and...

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