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WE INVOKE COMPLIANCE WITH TWO DEFINITE AND SACRED COVENANTS, WHICH WERE

MADE TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES WHEN REPEAL OF THE EIGHTEENTH AMENDMENT WAS SUBMITTED TO THEM

First covenant, solemnly and widely proclaimed and reiterated by the President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt, that

"The objective we seek through the National policy is the education of every citizen toward greater temperance throughout the Nation.".

Second covenant, widely broadcast by the president of the Association against the Prohibition Amendment, Mr. Pierre S. duPont, as follows:

"As it is the policy of this country to reduce sales of liquor, no advertising of any kind should be permitted to manufacturers or to sellers. The United States mail should be closed to such advertising." (From original script used in his broadcast.)

The American people had a right to rely upon the solemn declaration of the President of this Nation of a “national policy" of "greater temperance" through "education," and on the strength of this, induring representation, many of them were persuaded to try repeal of the eighteenth amendment. Instead of "greater temperance" through true education, we are having "greater intemperance" through malevolent advertising with false education.

The American people also had a right to rely upon the similar inducements, widely proclaimed by the outstanding organization of the country, namely the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment, headed by Mr. Pierre S. duPont, who piloted the repeal amendment. This organization was well equipped with money and facilities, having, according to the testimony before Congress, collected over $850,000 in 1938 to promote repeal.

The solemn covenants made by President Roosevelt and President duPont of the AAPA, now entitle the people of the United States to insist that these inducing considerations and promises for their voting for repeal, be made good and redeemed.

It is admitted that the advertising appeal to drink liquor does not promote greater tenperance, but, on the other hand, promotes greater drinking. The covenant that liquor should not be advertised, and that it should be banned from the mails, should now be made good by the passage of Senate bill 265. To not pass it would rermit these liquor interests to have practiced a great deception and fraud on the American people, and to have obtained benefits and advantages through misrepresentation, false pretenses, and unredeemed promises.

On behalf of the Nation's boys and girls, we ask that the promises and representations and covenants be now redeemed.

NATION'S ALARMING AND WIDE SPREAD LIQUOR DRINKING FRIGHTFULLY GROWING

THROUGH LIQUOR ADVERTISING The undisputed amount of money spent for alcoholic beverages in the United States in 1946 was $8,770,000,000, or nearly one-fourth of the amount of the national budget for all governmental purposes for the coming fiscal year. We quote from Congressman Sheppard's testimony, quoting from a telegram he received from Printer's Ink:

"In 358 daily and Sunday newspapers in 108 cities 1946 wine advertising amounted to $1,936,113; liquor advertising, $8,639,420 ; beer, $4,957,361. Magazine, 1946 wine and liquor advertising combined, $23,964.882, and beer, $2,568,842. All of above refers to firms spending more than $5,000."

Senator Capper continues: “It is advertising, I believe, that has pushed up the sales, particwarly of whiskies and other distilled spirits, 15 percent in the single year from 1945 to 1916."

Senator Capper pointed out how this was “to create new customers, especially among women and children."

Alarming, destructive, deadly-How long O Lord? How long?

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LIQUOR INDUSTRY'S ENORMOUS EXPENDITURES FOR ADVERTISING TO ARTIFICIALLY STIMU.

LATE THE DRINKING OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BY WOMEN AND YOUTH A most careful research made by a committee headed by Dr. R. H. Martin, editor in chief of the Christian Statesman, Pittsburgh, Pa., who testified before the Senate committee, was to the effect that investigation disclosed that the entire 1,470 manufacturers of alcoholic beverages spent in advertising in 1946 between $100,000,000 and $112.000,000.

Dr. Martin's committee reported that this industry is heading up into a gigantic monopoly, as is evidenced by the fact that 42 percent of this total expenditure of $76,600,000 by these 142 companies—approximately $32,000,000—was spent by the following seven big distilling companies: Seagrams, Schenley, National Distillers, Hiram Walker, Gooderham & Worts, Continental, Glenmore, and Park & Tilford Distilleries.

As to advertisements in magazines, Dr. Martin reports that one company, Time, Inc., which publishes Life, Time, and Fortune, heads the entire list; that an investigation of these three niagazines, to obtain the number of liquor advertisements they contained for 1946 together with the revenue received therefrom on the basis of their published rates of advertising, reveals the startling fact that they contained 1,137 liquor ads and received therefrom a revenue of approxi. mately $8,000,000—$6,000,000 for Life and $2,000,000 for Time and Fortune.

This is just one set of magazines owned by one company. Besides the many millions spent for liquor advertising in magazines there are other millions spent in the daily papers and for broadcasts over the radio, all totaling about $100,000,000 or more to carry out what the liquor dealers themselves indicated as their objectives in one of their conventions at the Stephens Hotel in 1935.

“Teach American women how to drink.”
“Invite and welcome them to your bars and tap rooms."
"Show young people how to enjoy the 'delightful' wines of America."

"Train your publicity to catch the eye and develop the interest of the younger generation."Make youth liquor conscious

make it smart to drink wine." "We need to understand the habits of women and the younger generation."

STATEMENTS OF ADVERTISING AGENCIES AS TO THE PURPOSES OF ADVERTISING

Proponents had a public relations agency send out the following telegram to well-known advertising agencies throughout the Nation :

“Our client asks us to query you as follows: 'In your advertising experience is advertising used primarily to increase the sale of the product advertised? If not what is primary object of advertising? Please wire night letter immediately collect up to 100 words."

We filed at the Senate committee's hearing a statement containing the answers received to that date. The following is a digest of these answers:

The uniform answer was “Yes."
Others were as follows:
"To increase sales."
“To make more money through increased sales."
"To sell merchandise."
"To mentally change a need into a sales producing want."
"To make your client richer than he is at present.”
“To build general consumers acceptance of product.”

THE DELUGE OF INDIVIDUAL MENTAL IMPRESSIONS MADE THROUGH ADVERTISEMENTS,

WHICH GLAMORIZE LIQUOR DRINKING

At a recent convention of national advertisers, estimates were given to the effect that $100,000,000 spent for advertising produced 3742 billion "mental impressions," i, C., "one mental impression on one person." This means an annual arerage of 250 "mental impressions” on each individual man, woman, and child in the Nation by the $100,000,000 spent for advertising by the liquor interests.

INCIDENTS SHOWING EFFECT OF MERELY A SINGLE MENTAL IMPRESSION

Incident No. 1: One of the witnesses testified that he had read one of these ads to his 10-year-old grandson, who, after hearing it, looked up into the grandfather's face and said,"Grangy, if I wasn't your all's little boy, I'd want to try some of that myself."

Incident No. 2: The following telling incident was also related at the hearing. A Jewish boy, who heard one reading of Lamb's Dissertation on Roast Pig, was so mored to try the deliciously portrayed dish, that at his first opportunity he sneaked in the side door of an obscure restaurant and prilared roast pork. Merely one lone build-up of roast pig heard by that boy caused him to discard all the traditions of Israel's fathers against their people eating hog meat.

When we realize that the above incidents typically represent the moving effect of merely a single mental impression by an alluring description of its taste, we shudder to think of the effect of 3114 billions of such mental impressions each year on the 130,000,000 people of the United States, or 230 on each man, woman, and child.

The beer drinking "putch" in the "beer hall” at Munich, resulting in Adolf Hitler's rise to power and the precipitation of Germany into chaus and ruin, could easily be right around the corner from us in America, inless the ildvertising of drinking of alcoholic beverages is banned at once. We hope it may not already be "later than we think.God forbid !

LIQUOR ADS VIOLATE ALL THE REQUIREMENTS LAID DOWN IN JURISPRUDENCE AS TO

STATEMENTS DESIGNED TO INDUCE SALES

From the lawbooks the following are the requirements as to vendors and sales. No vendor shall1. Make statements recklessly. 2. Make any false, mislcading or deceptive statement. 3. Create any false or misleading impressions. 4. Tell only a half-truth, which is the equivalent of concealing the other half.

5. Fail to disclose any known or lurking dunger in the use or misuse of the article offered.

6. Remain silent when it is his duty to speak.
7. Suppress or fail to state a firct, which should be disclosed.

8. Fail, when dealing with the inerperienced, such as youth, to reveal everything about the article, so as to put youth on an equul footing with rendor.

9. Fail to communicate vendors' superior knowledge about the article to those with less means of knowledge than himself.

10. Suppress or conceal any fact within vendor's knowledge, which will materially qualify those facts, which are stated.

11. Fail to give warnings and cautions as to any use, which might be dangerous. THE TRANSPORTATION IN THE MAILS OF LIQUOR ADVERTISEMENTS IN NEWSPAPERS

AND MAGAZINES, IS IN REALITY LARGELY GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIZED Testimony is now before a congressional committee that second-class mail matter pays only 25 percent of its expenses; that during the 16 years from 1930 to 1945 the postal deficit from second-class mail matter was the stupendous amount of $1,450,000,000, or an annual yearly average deficit of over $90.000,000.

Dr. R. H. Martin testified that one company, Time, Inc., which publishes Life, Time, and Fortune, heads the entire list, publishing liquor ads, which, figured at the regular published rates, amounted to $8,000,000. The actual amount received would be some less than the above amount when figured in quantity discounts.

The Chicago Tribune on February 5 states that a postal deficiency of Life and Time alone amounts to $12,000,000 a year. Quite a substantial portion of the $12,000,000 Government subsidy on the above publications was for liquor ads.

Of the $90,000,000 average annual deficit on second class mail for the first 16 years, a substantial part was a subsidy enjoyed by advertisers glamorizing and counseling liquor drinking.

Query. Should the Government subsidize liquor advertisements to degrade and debauch her citizens and youth?

The radio spectrum belongs to the people. The licensees of the various frequencies are fiduciary trustees required under the law to use same in the "public interest."

Query. Should these trustees be permitted to operate these frequencies of the people for liquor advertisements against the interest of the owners, the people?

BAFETY FROM ACCIDENTS IS ALONE SUFFICIENT TO MAKE IT IMPERATIVE THAT THIS

BILL BE PASSED

The National Safety Council's last report covering data for 1945 shows the following:

"One out of six drivers inrolved in fatal accidents bad been drinking.”

"One out of four adult pe strians killed had been drin ing compared with one out of fire in 1941,"

"A driver or a pedestrian who had been drinking was involved in one out of every four fatul uccidents-no change from 1944."

"The proportion of drivers who had been drinking was between 17 and 18 percent, about the same as last year."

“Drivers reported 'under the influence' at the time of the accident increased from 5 percent in 1944 to 8 percent in 1945."

“Even higher proportions of drivers and pedestrians were found to be under the influence of alcohol in accident surveys employing chemical tests of body fluids."

"Drinking drivers are three or four times as likely to be involved in an accident."

"Drivers with 0.15 percent or more alcohol in the blood, the group who are definitely under the influence, have an accident rate 55 times that of the nondrinker."

"Nearly 18 percent of all drivers involved in fatal accidents had been drinking and 23 percent of all adult pedestrians killed had been drinking." SOME OF THE CHARACTERIZATIONS MADE BY PROPONENTS AS TO LIQUOR ADVERTISEMENTS

"Nullify" teachings of parents. One irate and helpless father says: “These advertisements tell my children that their father is a liar."

Nullify teachings of churches and schools.
"Obnoxious."
“Blighting."
"Sordid."
"Shameful."
"Scrofulous."
"Evil."
"Insidious invasions of homes."
“Seductive."

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"Misleading." “Utterly false." “Unwarranted." "Detrimental to health." "Detrimental to morals." "Detrimental to spirtual welfare." "Detrimental to safety." "Ensnaring to youth." "Not having interest of community at heart." "Promotes sin." "Have disastrous effects on human body, human mind, and human society." "Produces human misery, maimed bodies and minds."

"Creates false ideas that liquor is associated with success, refinement, and distinction."

"Offensive."
“Greatest single contributing factor to delinquency."
"Strikes at the very life line of the Nation.”
"Insidious menace to Nation's health and welfare."
“Lifeblood of mass destruction."
"Menaces public safety, public peace, public order."
"Produces following results on the raw human material on which it operates:

Goes in clean, comes out dirty.
Goes in pure, comes out defiled.
Goes in healthy. comes out diseased.
Goes in brondcloth, comes out rags.
Goes in sober, comes out drunk.

Goes in boy, comes out a bum. a drunkard, a pauper, a slave, a criminal, a lunatic, a lost week end, a lost life.

Goes in a home, comes out a hell."--Dr. Clinton N. Howard.) "It is as dangerous as matches for babies or snakes for teen agers.Bruin's most seductive enemy." "Ghastly mockery." “Monumental disservice to our people." "Brings about break-down of our homes." "Deceives an unwary segment of our population." "Creates a fog rather than a light." Artificially stimulates demoralizing habits." "Contributes to crime and moral delinquency." “Diabolic propaganda.” "Produces harm in every American home.” "Corruptly detrimental."Tragically miseducation."

Liquor advertising was condemned for not only what it says but also for what it fails to say. R. G. LeTourneau points out that it does not tell of the

"Porerty."
"Broken homes."
"Wrecked lives."
"Lost virtue."
“Suicides."
"Homicides."

“Sudden accidental deaths." Mr. T. Morton McDonald, lawyer of Princeton, Ind., points out liquor advertisements never picture nisers as "drunks," or "flop-house residents," or "prostitutes," or "denizens of houses of ill fame."

Other witness points out that the obnoxious advertisements sound "no warning," or "no caution as to use," which should be the case in selling such a dangerous product.

PRECEDENTS OF CONGRESS, BANNING FROM INTERSTATE COMMERCE OTHER INJURIOUS

THINGS

Congress, in its wisdom, in the exercise of its power to regulate commerre, for the purpose of promoting the general welfare, has prohibited, either by its own direct decrees or by direction and authority vested by Congress in Government Cabinet officers and officials, obnoxious and objectional articles and movements of same in commerce. These apply to articles and movements, which would tend to injure the interests of the United States and its people; that among these

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