Popular Measures: Poetry and Church Order in Seventeenth-century Massachusetts

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University of Delaware Press, 2005 - 282 sider
In Popular Measures, Amy Morris examines the influence of church practices on the poetry of seventeenth-century New England. In a community where the Book of Common Prayer was banished from the church, and preference was given to the plain-style sermon (delivered orally and often without notes), what role was there for religious poetry? As a humanly crafted, fixed form, poetry fell short of the ideal of spontaneous, spirit-filled language promoted by Congregationalists. By analyzing the impact of this religious culture on the design of early New England verse, Morris shows how writers adapted English poetic conventions to fit their new colonial context.
Throughout her investigation, Dr. Morris explains the relevant political and religious background, especially the controversial "Halfway Covenant," that shaped the popular measures of colonial America.
 

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Innhold

Introduction
11
The Meaning of Forms
31
The Bay Psalm Book and the Halfway Poetics of Worship
76
The Halfway Covenant and The Day of Doom
114
Gods Determinations and the Conversion Relation
157
Conclusion
205
Notes
216
Works Cited
256
Index
275
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Om forfatteren (2005)

Amy Morris teaches English and American Literature at Cambridge University, where she is a member of the English faculty and a Fellow of Fitzwilliam College.

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