Studies in the History of Educational Opinion from the Renaissance

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University Press, 1905 - 261 sider

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Side 168 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Side 130 - The End of our Foundation is the knowledge of Causes, and secret motions of things ' ; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
Side 183 - A SOUND mind in a sound body, is a short but full description of a happy state in this world : he that has these two, has little more to wish for ; and he that wants either of them, will be but little the better for any thing else.
Side 184 - I think I may say, that, of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education.
Side 180 - I believe that this is not a bow for every man to shoot in that counts himself a teacher, but will require sinews almost equal to those which Homer gave Ulysses...
Side 169 - These ways would try all their peculiar gifts of nature ; and if there were any secret excellence among them would fetch it out, and give it fair opportunities to advance itself by...
Side 161 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Side 177 - Prudence and Justice are virtues and excellencies of all places. We are perpetually moralists, but we are geometricians only by chance. Our intercourse with intellectual nature is necessary ; our speculations upon matter are voluntary and at leisure. Physiological learning is of such rare emergence, that one may know another half his life, without being able to estimate his skill in hydrostatics or astronomy ; but his moral and prudential character immediately appears.
Side 120 - I confess that I have as vast contemplative ends, as I have moderate civil ends : for I have taken all knowledge to be my province ; and if I could purge it of two sorts of rovers, whereof the one with frivolous disputations, confutations, and verbosities, the other with blind experiments and auricular traditions and impostures, hath committed so many spoils, I hope I should bring in industrious observations, grounded conclusions, and profitable inventions and discoveries ; the best state of that...
Side 168 - ... to all the art of cavalry, that having in sport, but with much exactness and daily muster, served out the rudiments of their soldiership in all the skill of...

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