The Political Text Book: Comprising a View of the Origin and Objects of Government, and an Examination of the Principal Social and Political Institutions of England

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W. Strange, 1833 - 248 sider
 

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Side 214 - THERE is nothing which so generally strikes the imagination, and engages the affections of mankind, as the right of property ; or that sole and despotic dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world, in total exclusion of the right of any other individual in the universe.
Side 126 - And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so truth be in the field, we do injuriously by licensing and prohibiting to misdoubt her strength. Let her and falsehood grapple; who ever knew truth put to the worse, in a free and open encounter?
Side 65 - Nevertheless the people refused to obey the voice of Samuel ; and they said, Nay ; but we will have a king over us ; that we also may be like all the nations ; and that our king may judge us, and go out before us, and fight our battles.
Side 147 - The annual labour of every nation is the fund which originally supplies it with all the necessaries and conveniences of life which it annually consumes, and which consist always either in the immediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations.
Side 244 - But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King ? The chief priests answered, We have no King but Caesar.
Side 4 - Society is produced by our wants, and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices. The one encourages intercourse, the other creates distinctions. The first is a patron, the last a punisher. Society in every state is a blessing, but Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one...
Side 244 - Ye have brought this man unto me as one that perverteth the people; and behold, I, having examined him before you, have found no fault in this man touching those things whereof ye accuse him; no, nor yet Herod; for I sent you to him, and lo, nothing worthy of death is done unto him. I will therefore chastise him and release him.
Side 116 - The absolute rights of man, considered as a free agent, endowed with discernment to know good from evil, and, with power of choosing those measures which appear to him to be most desirable, are usually summed up in one general appellation, and denominated the natural liberty of mankind. This natural liberty consists properly in a power of acting as one thinks fit, without any restraint or controul, unless by the law of nature...
Side 126 - For who knows not that Truth is strong, next to the Almighty; she needs no policies, nor stratagems, nor licensings to make her victorious, those are the shifts and the defences that Error uses against her power.
Side 3 - SOME writers have so confounded society with government, as to leave little or no distinction between them; whereas they are not only different, but have different origins. Society is produced by our wants and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices.

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