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survivor or survivors of them, their heirs, executors, and admi. nistrators, the said annuity or yearly rent charge of twenty pounds sterling per annum, devised by the said Lord Newtown to the said Anne, to have, receive, and enjoy the same, during the life of the said Anne, to the uses, intents, and purposes herein after specified ; that is to say, it is my will, that my said trustees, and the survivor or survivors of them, his and their heirs, executors, and administrators, shall (so soon after they shall have received the annuity, or any part thereof, as conveniently they can) pay or cause to be paid unto the said Anne Ridgeway the said annuity of twenty pounds sterling per annum, during her life. In witness whereof, I, the said Dr Jonathan Swift, have hereunto set my hand and seal, and published this codicil, as part of my last will and testament, this fifth day of May, 1740.

JONATHAN SWIFT.

Signed, sealed, and published, in presence of us, who

witnessed this codicil, in presence of the said testator.

John Lyon.
William Dunkin.
Roger Kendrick,

No. VII.

PRESENT STATE OF ST PATRICK S HOSPITAL.

It may be interesting to the reader to know something of the history and present state of the Hospital, for the foundation of which Swift bequeathed his fortune.

It has been observed in the Memoirs, that Oxmantown-Green was at one time proposed for the site of the intended asylum, (see p. 389.)

But this plan was laid aside, and the building, as directed by Swift, in his will, was erected in the vicinity of Dr Steevens's Hospital, adjoining to James's-street, in the city of Dublin. The Dean is said to have observed, that if it could be made to reach from thence to the Phænix Park, there would be always a sufficient number of occupants.

The trustees were incorporated by charter, 5th August, 1746. The funds bequeathed by the Dean being found inadequate to complete the building on the scale intended, they were augmented by contributions and legacies of well-disposed persons, and in 1757 the asylum was opened for reception of patients. The building, as it stands at present, forms a parallelogram, of which one of the more narrow sides is still open. The Hospital consists of three stories; the female wards to the west of the building, ranging from south to north, and the wards for men towards the east, and ranging to the same points. The basement contains the offices necessary for the establishment. The cells are one hundred and sixty-nine in number, and the health of the unhappy patients is provided for by six separate galleries for exercise, which can be heated or ventilated according to the season of the year, and are kept in the highest order. These galleries open upon gardens and airing grounds, which the patients occupy when the nature of their cases will permit. I am informed, that the utmost order and cleanliness prevail throughout this asylum, and that the unfortunate inhabitants are, upon no occasion whatever, subjected to punishment or severity. The Hospital, like the Bedlam of London, was formerly open to the public, but no visitors are now admitted without a ticket from one of the governors.

In order to maintain this extensive establishment, it was found necessary to admit patients of the better ranks as boarders at different rates, according to their circumstances.

There are at present in the Hospital thirteen patients of the first class, at one hundred guineas per year ; forty-one boarders of the second class, at sixty guineas per year; six respectable females maintained as boarders, but without expense; fifty-one paupers in the female, and fifty-two in the male wards ;—amounting in all to one hundred and sixty-three patients.

From the funds bequeathed by the Dean, and by various other testators, particularly Sir Richard Levinge, Bart., Dr Sterne, Bishop of Clogher, Reverend John Worrall, Dr Joshua Pullen, and others, the endowment of the Trinity Hospital amounts to L.2500 a-year.

Various grants have been made by the Irish Parliament, amounting in all to L.8000, for the purpose of discharging debt and enlarging the establishment. The annual expenditure of the Hospital amounts to L.5500 yearly, which is faithfully and judiciously laid out for the benevolent purposes of the institution.

These particulars are abridged from the information furnished to Mr Hartstonge by the Reverend Dean Keating of St Patrick's, whose unremitting attention to this excellent charity is beyond all praise, and by Mr Campbell, the present Master of the Hospital, whose judicious and humane management ought not to be for. gotten in this place.

No. VIII.

THE CHARACTER OF DOCTOR SWIFT, AFTER HIS DEATH.

October 21st, 1745.
On Saturday last, died, at the Deanery-

House in Kevin Street,
The Rev. JONATHAN SWIFT, D.D.

Dean of St Patrick's, Dublin :
The greatest genius that this or perhaps any other age

or nation ever produced.
His indefatigable application to study in his earlier

days, induced a total deprivation of his
understanding, in which state he has
continued for some years past.

His writings,
Which must be admired as long as the English

language continues to be understood,
Are remarkable for a vein of wit and humour,
Which runs through the whole of them without
exception, and which is not to be met with

in those of any other author.
His satire, though poignant, was intended rather to

reform than ridicule ;
His manner was ever easy and natural;

His thoughts new and pleasing ;
His style chaste and polished ;

His verse smooth and flowing.
In his private character he was no less excellent ;
His conversation was always pleasant and agreeable ;

He was pious without hypocrisy,

Virtuous without austerity,
And beneficent without ostentation.

As he loved his country,
So he was ever watchful of its interest,

And zealous to promote it.

No wonder then,
That with these qualifications and endowments,
He became the delight of his countrymen,

And the admiration of foreigners.
In short, it may with justice be said,

That he was a great and good man,
An honour to his country and to human nature.

No. IX.

A PORTRAIT OF DR SWIFT,

Presented to the University of Oxford, by the late John Bar.

ber, Esq., is placed in the Picture- Gallery there, with this Inscription :

IONATHAN SWIFT,

DECAN. S. PATRIC. DVBL.

EFFIGIEM VIRI MVSIS AMICISSIMI,

INGENIO PRORSVS SIBI PROPRIO CELEBERRIMI,

VT IPSVM SVIS OXONIENSIBVS ALIQVATENVS

REDONARET,

PARIETEM HABERE VOLVIT BODLEIANVM,

A. D. MDCCXXXIX,

IOHANNES BARBER, ARMIGER,

ALDERMANNVS,

NEC ITA PRIDEM PRAETOR LONDINENSIS.

In English:

JONATHAN SWIFT,

DEAN OF ST PATRICK'S, DUBLIN.

This portrait of the Muses' friend,
Of a happy turn of wit, peculiar to himself,
That he might in some sort be restored to his Oxford

Friends,
Was placed in the wall of the Bodleian Gallery,

A. D. MDCCXXXIX,
At the desire of John Barber, Esquire,
Alderman, and some time Lord Mayor of London.

No. X.

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Dr Stopford, Bishop of Cloyne, who always acknowledges, that he owed every step of his preferment entirely to Swift, paid the following tribute to the memory of his deceased friend and benefactor :

MEMORIÆ JONATH. SWIFT, 8. Quem vivum ex animo coluit, amico liceat mortuum deflere, atque hoc qualicunque fungi munere.

A. C. 1745 Octobris die 19mo obiit JONATHAN SWIFT, Dacenus Ecclesiæ Cathedralis Sancti Patricii Dubliniensis; vixit annos septuaginta septem, decem menses, 19 dies.

“ Vir, ultra quam homini concessum videtur, maximis ornatus virtutibus. Vires ingenii mirandæ potius, quam a quoquam exoptandæ; quas exercuit præcipuè in politicis et poetica.

Incorruptus inter pessimos mores ; magni atque constantis animi ; libertatis semper studiosissimus, atque nostri reipublicæ status, a Gothis quondam sapienter instituti, laudator perpetuus, propugnator acerrimus. Cujus tamen formam, ambitu et largitione adeo fædatam ut vix nunc dignosci possit, sæpius indignabundus plorabat.

“ Patriæ amore flagrans, sortem Hiberniæ quoties deflevit, quoties laboranti subvenit, testes epistolæ illæ nunquam interituræ, quibus, insulam miserè labantem, jamque juga ahenea subeuntem, erexit, confirmavit; impiis inimicorum conatibus fortiter infractis, prostratis.

“ Privatam si inspicias vitam, cum illo gratias, lepores, sales interiisse dicas ; quibus suavissimè sermones conditi, summo tamen cum decore, utpote cui unicè propositum, quod verum, quod decens, amicis et civibus suis assiduè commendare.

“Nec levior flagitiorum vindex, fraudes, ambitionem, avaritiam, dictis acerrimè laceravit, exemplo feliciter oppressit.

* Erga bonos comis, liberalis, pius, commodis amicorum anxiè inserviens; pro pauperibus semper sollicitus ; quorum egestati in hac urbe mirè consuluit, pecuniâ mutuo datâ infimis artificum, in ratâ, eâque exiguâ portione, per septimanas rependenda, unde multi paupertati jam succumbentes, sese paulatim expedierunt.

“ Idem, abstinentiæ exemplar antiquûm, parce atque duriter rem familiarem administravit; quasque sibi inutiles spernebat opes, sedulo tamen comparatas, domui hospitali condendæ, mo

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