Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

" And that vile scoundrel”.

“Nay, his name restore, And call him Cecil,—for he is no more: “ When my vain help was offer'd, he was past “ All human aid, and shortly breathed his last; “ But his heart open'd, and he lived to see “ Guilt in himself, and find a friend in me.

“ Strange was their parting, parting on the day “ I offer'd help, and took the man away, “ Sure not to meet again, and not to live “ And taste of joy–He feebly cried, 'Forgive ! « I have thy guilt, thou mine, but now adieu ! • Tempters and tempted! what will thence ensue “I know not, dare not think!'-He said, and he

withdrew."

“ But, Ellis, tell me, didst thou thus desire
To heap upon their heads those coals of fire ?"

If fire to melt, that feeling is confest,
“ If fire to shame, I let that question rest;
But if aught more the sacred words imply,
" I know it not--no cominentator I.”

Then did you freely from your soul forgive?"

“ Sure as I hope before my Judge to live, “ Sure as I trust his

mercy to receive, “ Sure as his word I honqur and believe, « Sure as the Saviour died

upon

the tree “ For all who sin,—for that dear wretch and me,“ Whom never more on earth will I forsake or see.”

Sir Owen softly to his bed adjourn'd,
Sir Owen quickly to his home return'd;
And all the way he meditating dwelt
On what this man in his affliction felt;
How he, resenting first, forbore, forgave,
His passion's lord, and not his anger's slave:
And as he rode he seem'd to fear the deed
Should not be done, and urged unwonted speed.

Arrived at home, he scorn'd the change to hide,
Nor would indulge a mean and selfish pride,
That would some little at a time recal
Th’avenging vow; he now was frankness all :

He saw his nephew, and with kindness spoke“ Charles, I repent my purpose, and revoke, “ Take her-I'm taught, and would I could repay “ The generous teacher; hear me, and obey: Bring me the dear coquette, and let me vow On lips half perjured to be passive now: « Take her, and let me thank the powers divine “ She was not stolen when her hand was mine, “ Or when her heart—Her smiles I must forget, “ She my revenge, and cancel either debt."

Here ends our tale, for who will doubt the bliss
Of ardent lovers in a case like this?
And if Sir Owen's was not half so strong,
It may, perchance, continue twice as long.

TALES OF THE HALL.

BOOK XIII.

« ForrigeFortsett »