Travels Into Bokhara; Being the Account of a Journey from India to Cabool, Tartary, and Persia; Also, Narrative of a Voyage on the Indus. From the Sea to Lahore, with Presents from the King of Great Britain;: Performed Under the Orders of the Supreme Government of India, in the Years 1831, 1832, and 1833, Volum 2

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John Murray, Albemarle Street., 1834
 

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Side 399 - Arabians, the industry of the Greeks discovered a new channel, by which the productions of India might be conveyed to Constantinople. They were carried up the Indus, as far as that great river is navigable; thence they were transported by land to the banks of the river Oxus, and proceeded down its stream to the Caspian sea. There they entered the Volga, and sailing up it, were carried by land to the Tanais, which conducted them into the Euxine sea, where vessels from Constantinople waited their arrival.
Side 285 - any future cause call forth the combined ef" forts of the Sicques to maintain the existence " of empire and religion, we may see some " ambitious chief, led on by his genius and " success, absorbing the power of his associates, " display, from the ruins of their commonwealth,
Side 472 - ... Macedonian spear ; and in its place a sage appears, holding a flower, and invariably having a glory round his head, proving him to be a sacred personage.* Secondly, although upon the first coins of the dynasty, we find the inscription in Greek characters (a custom which prevailed under the...
Side 203 - The advantages of the Oxus both in a political and commercial point of view must then be regarded as very great: the many facilities which have been enumerated point it out either as the channel of merchandise or the route of a military expedition ; nor is it from the features of the river itself that we form such a conclusion. It is to be remembered that its banks are peopled and cultivated ; it must therefore be viewed as a navigable river, possessing great facilities for improving the extent of...
Side 203 - ... the extension and improvement of its trade. In either case the Oxus presents many fair prospects, since it holds the most direct course, and connects, with the exception of a narrow desert, the nations of Europe with the remote regions of Central Asia.
Side 335 - The justice of this chief affords a constant theme of praise to all classes : the peasant rejoices at the absence of tyranny ; the citizen at the safety of his home and the strict municipal regulations regarding weights and measures ; the merchant at the equity of the decisions and the protection of his property, and the soldiers at the regular manner in which their arrears are discharged. A man in power can have no higher praise.
Side 215 - I had much conversation with people who had been brought into contact with them, and in Cabool was fortunate enough to see a Kaffir boy about ten years old, who had left his country for a period of two years ; his complexion, hair, and features, differed from those of Asiatics : his eyes were of a bluish colour. The boy replied to many questions that were put to him about his country, and gave specimens of his language, which assimilated with the Indian dialects. The Kaffirs appear to be a most barbarous...
Side 471 - In the first place, the reverse ceases to bear the formerly national emblem of the Bactrian horseman, with the Macedonian spear ; and in its place a sage appears, holding a flower, and invariably having a glory round his head, proving him to be a sacred personage.* Secondly, although upon the first coins of the dynasty, we find the inscription in Greek characters (a custom which...
Side 470 - Taringim, of Turushca or Tatar origin. The Sanscrit MS. places their reign 150 years before Sacaysinha (or Sakya Singh) ; but the learned translator, in a note, proves that the text was at least misunderstood, and that the passage intended to express " 150 years after the emancipation of the Lord Sakya Sinha.
Side 252 - Dundan-shikun. carry sugar and mulberries with them, to ease their respiration ; and the strongest of men suffer from giddiness and vomiting. Thousands of birds are also found dead on the snow, for it is believed that they are unable to fly from the violence of the winds ; but it is more probable that they are prevented by the rarity of the atmosphere : yet birds are used to higher elevations than men and quadrupeds. They often attempt to walk across ; and numbers of them are ensnared.* Beasts of...

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