Tracts Upon the Union

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Tims, 1831 - 234 sider
 

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Side 16 - Henry VIII. and his three children. It can change and create afresh even the constitution of the kingdom and of Parliaments themselves ; as was done by the Act of Union, and the several statutes for triennial and septennial elections. It can, in short, do everything that is not naturally impossible ; and therefore some have not scrupled to call its power, by a figure rather too bold, the omnipotence of Parliament.
Side 168 - As a series of appeals must be finite, there necessarily exists in every government a power from which the constitution has provided no appeal ; and which power, for that reason, may be termed absolute, omnipotent, uncontrollable, arbitrary, despotic ; and is alike so in all countries.
Side 213 - And every member, though chosen by one particular district, when elected and returned, serves for the whole realm; for the end of his coming thither is not particular, but general ; not barely to advantage his constituents, but the common wealth...
Side 58 - An entire and perfect union will be the solid foundation of lasting peace: It will secure your religion, liberty, and property; remove the animosities amongst yourselves, and the jealousies and differences betwixt our two kingdoms. It must increase your strength, riches, and trade; and by this union the whole island, being joined in affection and free from all apprehensions of different interests, will be enabled to resist all its enemies.
Side 37 - ... animate both the insolence of the oppressors and the hatred and indignation of the oppressed, and which commonly render the inhabitants of the same country more hostile to one another than those of different countries ever are. Without a union with Great Britain, the inhabitants of Ireland are not likely for many ages to consider themselves as one people.
Side 185 - The annual produce of the land and labour of any nation can be increased in its value by no other means, but by increasing either the number of its productive labourers, or the productive powers of those labourers who had before been employed.
Side 185 - We are more industrious than our forefathers; because in the present times the funds destined for the maintenance of industry are much greater in proportion to those which are likely to be employed in the maintenance of idleness than they were two or three centuries ago.
Side 76 - Britain, on which connection the interests and happiness of both nations essentially depend : but that the kingdom of Ireland is a distinct kingdom, with a parliament of her own — the sole legislature thereof. That there is no body of men competent to make laws to bind this nation except the King, Lords and Commons of Ireland ; nor any other parliament which hath any authority or power of any sort whatsoever in this country save only the Parliament of Ireland.
Side 16 - It hath sovereign and uncontrollable authority in the making, confirming, enlarging, restraining, abrogating, repealing, reviving, and expounding of laws, concerning matters of all possible denominations, ecclesiastical or temporal, civil, military, maritime, or criminal: this being the place where that absolute despotic power, which must in all governments reside somewhere, is entrusted by the constitution of these kingdoms.
Side 58 - The particulars of it seem so reasonable, that I hope they will meet with approbation in the Parliaments of both kingdoms. I wish, therefore, that my servants of Scotland may lose no time in going down to propose it to my subjects of that kingdom ; and I shall always look upon it as a particular happiness, if this Union, which will be so great a security and advantage to both kingdoms, can be accomplished in my reign.

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