The Port Folio

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Editor and Asbury Dickens, 1814

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Del 19
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Del 25
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347

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Del 27
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Del 28
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Del 30
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Del 31
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Del 32
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Del 34
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Del 35
564
Del 36
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Populære avsnitt

Side 267 - ... neither would he compare the friendship between him and them to a Chain, for the rain might sometimes rust it, or a tree might fall and break it; but he should consider them as the same flesh and blood with the Christians, and the same as if one man's body were to be divided into two parts.
Side 550 - ... and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom.
Side 283 - Shall never more be thine. The silence of that dreamless sleep I envy now too much to weep; Nor need I to repine That all those charms have pass'd away ; I might have watch'd through long decay.
Side 191 - I view Wakes in my soul some charm of lovely Sue. Though battle call me from thy arms, Let not my pretty Susan mourn ; Though cannons roar, yet, safe from harms, William shall to his dear return. Love turns aside the balls that round me fly, Lest precious tears should drop from Susan's eye.
Side 282 - It is enough for me to prove That what I loved and long must love Like common earth can rot ; To me there needs no stone to tell, 'Tis nothing that I loved so well.
Side 282 - AND thou art dead, as young and fair As aught of mortal birth ; And form so soft, and charms so rare, Too soon return'd to Earth ! Though earth received them in her bed, And o'er the spot the crowd may tread In carelessness or mirth, There is an eye which could not brook A moment on that grave to look.
Side 550 - All the pleasing illusions which made power gentle and obedience liberal, which harmonized the different shades of life, and which, by a bland assimilation incorporated into politics the sentiments which beautify and soften private society, are to be dissolved by this new conquering empire of light and reason.
Side 190 - Susan, Susan, lovely dear, My vows shall ever true remain; Let me kiss off that falling tear; We only part to meet again. Change, as ye list, ye winds; my heart shall be The faithful compass that still points to thee.
Side 327 - Who doth not feel, until his failing sight Faints into dimness with its own delight, His changing cheek, his sinking heart confess The might...
Side 94 - But first, on earth as Vampire' sent, Thy corse shall from its tomb be rent : Then ghastly haunt thy native place, And suck the blood of all thy race ; There from thy daughter, sister, wife, At midnight drain the stream of life ; Yet loathe the banquet which perforce Must feed thy livid living corse : Thy victims ere they yet expire Shall know the demon for their sire, As cursing thee, thou cursing them, Thy flowers are wither'd on the stem.

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