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NEW CABINET CYCLOPÆDIA,

COMPREHENDING

A COMPLETE SERIES OF

Essays, Treatises, and Systems,

ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED;

WITH A GENERAL DICTIONARY OF

ARTS, SCIENCES, AND WORDS:

THE WHOLE

PRESENTING A DISTINCT SURVEY OF

Human Genius, Learning, and Industry.

ILLUSTRATED WITH

ELEGANT ENGRAVINGS;
THOSE ON NATURAL HISTORY BEING FROM ORIGINAL DRAWINGS BY EDWARDS AND

OTHERS, AND BEAUTIFULLY COLOURED AFTER NATURE.

BY JOHN MASON GOOD, ESQ. F.R.S.
MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, AND OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY OF

PHILADELPHIA;

OLINTHUS GREGORY, LL.D.
OF THE ROYAL MILITARY ACADEMY, WOOLWICH, AND HONORARY MEMBER OF THE LITERARY AND

PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE ; AND
MR. NEWTON BOSWORTH,

OF CAMBRIDGE;
ASSISTED BY OTHER GENTLEMEN OF EMINENCE, IN DIFFERENT

DEPARTMENTS OF LITERATURE.

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PRINTED FOR J. WALKER; SHERWOOD, NEELY, AND JONES'; BALDWIN, CRADOCK,

AND JOY; SUTTABY, EVANCE, AND FOX; E. JEFFERY; W. LOWE; J. BOOTH;
J. BLACKLOCK; RODWELL AND MARTIN; BELL AND BRADFUTE, EDINBURGH ;
BRASH AND REID, GLASGOW; AND M. KEENE, DUBLIN,

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PANTOL OG I A.

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Q.
A consonant, borrowed from the Latin vowels into one syllable; and that the Cim-

or French, for which the Saxons gene- ported them to be divided. tally used cp, cw; and the sixteenth letter of Hence it is, that Lucretius uses cuiret for the alphabet.

three syllables, in lieu of quiret; acua, for The name of this letter is cue, from queue, aqua; and that Plautus uses relicuum, for reliFrench, tail; its form being that of an Ở with quum ; as in quod dedi, datum non vellum, rea tail.

licuum non ; where the cuum must be two sylThe Q has this peculiar to it, that it is al- lables, otherwise the trochaic verse will be lame ways followed by an U, and is, therefore, of a foot reckoned among the mutes.

In the French, the sound of the Q and K are The Q is formed from the Hebrew p, koph; so near akin, that some of their nicest authors which inost other languages have borrowed ; think the former might be spared. Ramus though some of them have rejected it again, adds, that, till the establishment of royal proparticularly the Greeks, who now only retain fessors in the university of Paris, under Francis it as a mumeral character, called xotic alonucov. I. they always used Q in the Latin the same as

In effect, there is that resemblance between in the French ; pronouncing kis, kalis, kantus, the Q and C, in some languages, and the K in &c. for quis, qualis, quantus. See K. others, that many grammarians, in imitation Some very learned men make Q a double of the Greeks, banish the Q as a superfluous letter, as well as K and X. According to them, letter. Papias even affirms, that all the Latin Q is evidently a C and U joined together. words now wrote with a Q, were written It is not enough that the sound is the same, among the ancient Romans with a C; but we but they see the traces of the CU in the figure of want better authorities for this. For, though the Q; the V being only laid obliquely, so as that may hold in many cases, insomuch that to come within the cavity of the C; as C. some write indifferently, quur, or cur; cum, or To confirm this, they say the ancients wrote quum; quotidie, or cotidie, &c. yet does it not qi, , qid. Though Jos. Scaliger, Littleton, thence follow, that they ever wrote cis, , cid, &c. think this no proof of the point; for in for quis, quæ, quid. What inscriptions autho- Gruter's inscriptions we find not only the Q, rize such a reading?

but also the C, put for QU; as Cintus, QuinFar from this, the ancients sometimes sub- tus; sicis for siquis, &c. Yet nobody ever stituted Q for C; and wrote quojus, quoi; for imagined the C a double letter. cujus, cui, &c.

Q, among the ancients, was a numeral letter, Varro, however, and some other gramma- signifying 500; as in the verse, rians, as we are told by Censorinus, &c. would never use the Q. The truth is, its use or dis

Q velut A cum D quingentos vult numerare. use seems to have been so little settled, and A dash over it, as , denoted it to signify agreed on, that the poets used the Qor Cindif- five hundred thousand. ferently, as best suited their measures; it being Q is also used as an abbreviature in several a rale, that the Q joined the two following arts, Q. pl. in physicians bills, stand for VOL. X.

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