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(52.) Let z be the numerator, that no possible difficulty can arise. Thus oxygen, meaning

Then I + 1 is the new numerator, the acid former," signifies a gas which entered into all the

And 2 (x + 1) the denominator. acids, the composition of which had been determined in the

1 era of Lavoisier, of which acids it was said to be the acidifying

Whence principle. Not the slightest idea appears to have been enter

2(x + 1) +3 3) iained by Lavoisier that hereafter acids might come to light

Again, as

Or, 3x = 2x + 5, removing fractions, &c. in whose composition oxygen did not even enter.

Therefore x = regards combustion, the gas chlorine was known to Lavoisier

And 2(x + 1) = 12;
and his associates, but the true nature of the gas was not

Consequently is the fraction.
known; it was incorrectly believed to contain oxygen, hence
the combustive experiments, recently witnessed by us, were

(53.) Let x be the greater number.
not at variance with the theory, or rather“ dogma," of oxygen Then 2-7 is the less number,
being the universal supporter of combustion,

Whence 23 – 7 = 33, per question,
The new chemical nomenclature, as we still call it, I mean

Or, 2x = 40;
the chemical nomenclature of Lavoisier and his associates

Therefore x = 20,

And x--7= 13.
during the carly part of the first French revolution is open to
many objections of this kind. It reflects at once the genius of

(54.) Let x be the greater number of voters.
that remarkable era, and inculcates a precept that persons

Then x - - 91 is the less number of ditto, who introduce new terms should ever remember. The precept

Whence 2x - 91 = 375, per question. of naming things in reference to some evident property, not

Or, 2x = 466 ; some theoretical one. Thus the term chlorine, expressive as

Therefore x = 233, it is of a yellowish-green colour, is totally independent of any

And a

91 = 142,
theory of the constitution of that simple element; whereas the
term oxymuriatic acid gas, formerly applied to it, is expressive of (55.) Let x be the whole length.
the assumed fact that it is a compound of oxygen and muriatic Then x = 4x + x + 10, per question.
acid gases--an idea which was violently maintained by some Or, 12x = 3x + 4x + 120;

And 5x =

120 ;
chemists, even after Sir H. Davy had shown its unsoundness.

Compounds of Chlorine with other Bodies.-Although the pre- Therefore x = 24.
sent lesson, and the one immediately preceding, have been (56.) Let 3 be the number of pence he had at first.
devoted especially to the examination of chlorine, nevertheless Then x = $x + x + x + 26, per question.
the student will have acquired, under various collateral heads, Or, 60x = 20x + 15x + 12x + 1560,
much previous information regarding this element. Thus, for And 13x = 1560 ;
example, in the lessons relating to silver, lead, and mercury, Therefore x = 120 pence, or 10s.
especially the former, he will have been made acquainted with
the peculiarities of the chlorides of these metals. Accordingly, | (67.) Let x be his age.

Then x x x = x, per question.
in summing up the relations of chlorine, and the means of

Whence ? = ,
detecting it, we shall presently have to detail several facts
already made known. Thus, indeed, it is in every part of

Or, tex = 1, by reduction and dission by x;

Therefore x = 16.
chemistry: facts are allied circularly, as it were, one with
another, so that, proceeding with our investigations, we in the (58.) Let x be the time expired.
end come back to the point where we set out,

Then 99 - x is the time to come,
Efect of Chlorine on soluble Silver Salts. - If we pour a little

Whence śr= }(99 — x), per question.
aqueous solution of nitrate of silver, or any soluble silver Or, 10x = 1188 -- 12x,
salt, into a jar containing chlorine gas, or into a little aqueous

Whence 22x 1188;
solution of that gas, we obtain the acidy white precipitate

Therefore 2 = 64.
insoluble in nitric acid, but soluble in ammonia. It is, in (59.) Let x be his age.
point of fact, the chloride of silver, already treated of in various Then x = 4x + 3x + 3x + 4, per question,
preceding lessons. The student, no doubt, remembers its

Or, 21% = 3.x + 7x + 7x + 84,
properties well. If the reader now finally ask himself what And 4x = 84 ;
this and the preceding lesson has taught him that he did not Therefore x = 21.
know before, he will arrive at the following conclusions.
(1) That, whereas previous information taught him the

(60.) Let u be the number required.
chemical properties of chlorine in combination; present

Then x x ft x şx = 4x x x, per question, information has taught him how to recognise chlorine when

And * = *x?, br multiplication, free or uncombined ; taught him by the following signs.

Whence 4.x = 27z2, by clearing of fractions, (2) Free chlorine alone is that which dissolves gold leaf and

Or, 4x = 27, by dividing by **. bleaches, although chlorine, in any soluble condition, yields

Therefore x = 6. with soluble silver salts the chloride of that metal,

Note.- Dele the word hours in the answer.
(61.) Let z be the number of hours required.

As the one travels it miles per huur,
LESSONS IN ALGEBRA.No. XV.

We have life +"="56, per"question,

Or, 6x + 5x = 616,
SOLUTIONS OF THE CENTENARY OF PROBLEMS.

Whence 11% = 616;

Therefore x = 56.
(Continued from page 108.)

(62.) Let x be the number of days required.
(61.) Let x be the tens' digit.
Then 5 - x is the units' digit,

As the wife drinks

1

th per day,
And 10.0 + 5 — $',

30
Or, 9x + 5 is the number;
And 10 (6

1
-x)+ a

-th
Or, 50 - 9x is the number inverted.
Whence 9x + 5 + 9 = 50 - 9x, per question.
Or, 18.3

And both drink

1
Therefore x = 2,
And 6 -1= 3,
Whence 23 is the number required.

1

1
12

+
30'

per question.

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Or, 5x = 60 + 2x, by clearing of fractions,
Whence 3x = 60;

Therefore x = 20.
(63.) Let be the number of sheep required.

Then x + x + 3x + 7) = 500, per question.
Or, 6x +15= 1000;
Whence 5x = 985;

Therefore 2 = 197.
(04.) Let u be the number of days required.

1 Then, as one man can do Tóth of the work per day,

3.0 ;

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Whence 30x 20x = 600, per question.
Or, 10x = 600;
Therefore x = 60,

30.x = 1800,
And 20.2 = 1200.
(71.) Let x be what was taken from B.

Then 2x is what was taken from A.
Also, 100 2x is what A had left,
And

48 -- * what B had left.
Whence 100 2x = 3 (48 — 2), per question.
Or, 100 – 2x = 144
Therefore x = 44,

And 2.x = 88.
(72.) Let x be A's share.

Then 256 + 1x is B's share,
And 270 +1 (256 + 3x),
Or, 398 + 4*, is C's share.
Whence ljx + 654 = 1200, per question.
Or, 7x = 2184;
Therefore x = 312;

256 + x = 412,

And 398 + 4x = 476.
(73.) Let x be the price of the first.

Then (2 x 7) - x= 14 - x is the price of the second.
And (2 X 9) -(14— x) = 4+x, the price of the third.
Whence } (x + 18) = (4 + x), per question.
Or, 8.1 + 144 = 60 + 16x ;
Whence 7x =84.
Therefore x = 12;
14

x = 2,
And 4 + x = 16.
(74.) Let å be the number of hours required.

1 Then is the part filled by the first pipe in an hour

11

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1 1
We have + , per question.

10 15
Or, 3x + 2x = 30, by removing fractions,
And 5x = 30;

Therefore x = 6.
(65.) Let z be the number of days required.

1 1 1 Then, as before,

per question.

20 Or, 3.2

3x = 60, And 2x = 60,

Therefore a = 30. (66.) Let x be the number of minutes required.

1 Then, one aqueduct fills th of the cistern per minute,

30

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per question.
30 40
Or, 4x - 3x = 120, by removing fractions ;

Thurefore x = 120.
(67.) Let z be the number of farthings.

Then 39 - x is the number of pence.
Whence 48 = x + 4 (39 — .c), per question.
Or, 48 = 156 — 3.x,
And 3x - 108;
Therefore I = 36,
And 39

*3.
(68.) Let a be the sum of money.

Then 4x + 4 is the share of the first child,
And 84 - 4, the remainder.
Also, 7 (ir - 4) + 8, or } + 8, is the share of

the second child.
Whence &x +4=nox -+8, per question.
Or, 6. + 144 = 5x 24 + 280 ;

Therefore 1 = 120.
(69.) Let I be the number of leaps required.

Then 3:4::X: $i;
Whence fx is the number of the hare's leaps after

starting.
And 1 x +50, the whole number of the hare's leaps.
But tr + 50 : x :: 3:2, per question.

8x
Whence 3x =

+ 100,

3
Or, 94 = 8x + 300;

Therefure x = 300.
(70.) Let it be the number of days required.

Then 30x is the distance travelled by A.
A d 200 he distance travelled by B.

11 Therefore x =

5.

2
(75.) Let x be the required price per gallon.

Then is the part remaining of each gallon,
Then 3:1:: á : 25, per question,

Whence x = 20.
(76.) Let x be the number of minutes required.

Then 11x is the space travelled by A.
And 113 « the space travelled by B.
Whence 1113 11x = 268, per question.
Or, sx = 268 ;

Therefore * = 804.
(77.) Let æ be the number of gallons of rum required.

Then is the number of gallons of water at first.
Also, x + a is the number of gallons of rum at second.
And to the number of gallons of water at second,

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3

, per question,

2000 -- 50% t + 12b * to a

Whence 75x + 17

=2000, per question Or,

38

Or, 2850x + 17 (2000) — 850x = 38 (2000);
And mx + ma = 11x + mub;

And 2000x = 21 (2000),
Whence (m — n.x = m(nb a),

Therefore x = 21,
m(nb -- a)
Therefore x =

2000 - 50 x
And

= 25,

38
nb
And

(86.) Let x be the number of days required.
Then, by arithmetical progression, we have 30 – (z –
1)1=31 –

- x for the distance travelled on the last (78.) Let x be the denominator.

day by the one, Then (a + 1) is the numerator.

And (30 + 31 — x) x the whole distance travelled by 1(x+1)+1

the same one.
Whence
5

Also, 20x is the whole distance travelled by the other,
Or, 3x = 2}x + 25 + 5;

Whence 20x = }(61 — X)x, per question.
And x = 71;

Or, 20 = (61 – x),
Therefore x = 15,

And 40 = 61 – x;

Therefore x = 21,
And f(x + 1) = 8.
Whence the fraction is 135.

(87.) Let a be the number of lines in a page.

And y the number of letters in a line.
(79.) Let æ be the numerator.
Then 2x + 1 is the denominator,

Then xy is the number of letters in a page.

If x + 1 be the number of lines,
1 1
Whence

And + 1 the number of letters,
-, per question,
236 3

Then (5+1) (y + 1) = xy + xty+1, is the num.
Or, 3.2
3 = 2x,

ber of letters in a page.
Therefore x = 3,

Again, if x + 2 be the number of lines,
And 2x +1=7;

And y + 4 the number of letters,
Whence the fraction is 4.

Then (r + 2) (y + 4) = xy + 4x +2y +8 is the rum. (80.) Let x be the money of the one.

ber of letters in a page. Then 100 ha is the money of the other,

Whence xy ++y1=ay + 96, per question,
Whence x + $(100 – 1x) = 100, per question.

And x +y = 95; equation A.
Or, 3x + 100 3x = 300,

Also, ay + 4r + 2y + 8 = xy + 286, per question,
And 6x -- l = 400 ;

And 4x + 2y = 278.
Whence 52 = 400;

Or, 2x + y = 139; equation B.
Therefore x = 80,

By subtracting equation A from equation B, we have
And 100 — 1x = 60.

3 = 44; (81.) [Having explained the nature of this problem very fully

And from equation A, we have

y = 95 - x=51.
betore, we refer our students to pp. 331 and 332,
vol. ii., and to p. 60, vol. iii.]

(88.) Let x be the money of the one,
(82.) Let x be the first number.

2 + 300 Then 4 (}x – 3) is the second.

Then

300 = 14 200 is the money of the Whence *x + $(fx – 3) = 10, per question,

other. Or, 5x + 16 (1x – 3) = 200,

Whence x + 800 = 2(43 — 200 + 800), per question,
And 5x + 3 48 = 200,

Or, x + 800 = ji + 1200;
Whence 15.0 + 16x -- 144 = 600,

And tax = 400;
And 312 = 744,

Therefore 2 = 1200,
Therefore x = 24,

And ta 200 = 200.
And 4(}— 3) = 20.

(89.) Let x be the number of minutes required.
(83.) Let x be the first number.

1 1 Then 3 (29 - 12) = 87 – fx is the second,

1 1

Then + +
Whence 21 = x + 187 — *x), per question.

per question.

80 200 300
Or, 252 = 4x + 3(87

Whence 153 to 6. + 4x = 1200.
And 252 = 40 + 261

And 25x = 1200,
Or, 504 = 8x + 522 - 9x,

Therefore x = 48,
Therefore x = 18,
And 87 - * = 60.

(90.) Let x be the sum won by A.

Then 42 +- x = 5(24 -- x), per question.
(84.) Let a be the first or hundreds’ digit.
Then x + 1 is the second oi tens' digit,

Whence 12 + x = 120 - 5.x,

And 6x 78,
And 22 X -- (+1)= 21 – 2x is the third or Therefore r = 13.

units' digit,
Whence 100x + 10 (x + 1) x + (21 -- 2x) + 297 =

(91.) Let & be the capital.
100 (21 – 2x) + 10 ( + 1) + x.

Then x + 5(745x) = 8208, per question,
Or, 99c + 297 = 99(21 -- 2x), by omitting equal quan.

Whence x 8208,
tities on both sides,

And 6x = 41040,
And x + 3 = 21 -- 2x, by dividing by 99,

Therefore x = 6840.
Whence 33 = 18;

(92.) Let & be the capital.
Therefore x = 6,

412
x+1=7,

= 13167, per question.
And 21
- 2x = 9,

100
Whence the number is 679.

Whence 100x + 4x = 1316700, (85.) Let x be the value of one kind in shillings.

And 200x + 9.4 2633400,
2000 – 50 x

Therefore x + 12600.
Then
is the value of the other kind in

(93.) Let å be the number of cavalry,
38
shillings,

Then x + 9x to 31 - 2600, per question,
Or, 13x = 2600;

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Therefore x = 200,

And 80x 72.c + 90x = 1440;
9.1 = 1800,

Whence 98.x = 1440,
And 3.x = 600.

And 49% = 720.
The 600 is misprinted 680 in the answers.

Therefore x = 141$;
(94.) Let x be the one part.

1 1

1 41 Then 46 -- is the other part,

1431

720
46 -
Whence + = 10, per question.

Whence 20:1 1 : 21= 17 il;
7
3

1

31
And 3.x + 322 – 7:0 = 210;
Whence 4x = 112;

9

;

720
Therefore x =
28,

And 39 = 23.1.
And 46 - = 18.

In the answer, 133$ is misprinted for 1114.
(95.) Let 8. be the number thrown from the first mortar after (100.) Let x be the number of the revolutions of the fore-wheel,

the second began,
And 7x the number thrown from the second mortar.

Then x + 6 is the number of the hind-wheel.
Then 8x + 36 : 73:: 4:3, per question ; for the quan-

120

Also, is the circumference of the fore-wheel,
tity of powder is inversely as the number of dis-

charges.
Whence 28.5 = 24x + 108.

120

And
And 42 = 108;

the circumference of the hind-wheel.

+6
Therefore x = 27,
And 73 = 189.

120

120

+4= (96.) Let ä be the ounces of gold in Hiero's crown.

Whence, 120

120

+1 Then 100 - x is the ounces of silver in it.

2+-6
Also, 192

= 20 is nearly the specific gravity of gold,
11, nearly the specific gravity of silver,

303

30.r+180

Or
And 104 = 16nearly the specific gravity of the crown.

+1=

i

120+2 126+3 100

100 Whence

39rt'80

317120
20
113
-, per question,

And

120.c+ 126+3
5x 900 – 9.2 600

Whence (126 + x)(31x + 120)=(120 + x)(30x +180),
Or,
+

;
100
100
100

And a2 + 246.0=6180.
And 4x = 300;

To solve this equation, which is an adfected quadratic, by the
Therefore 1 = 75,

Hindoo method, as we have been requested, we first multiply
And 100-1= 25.

both sides by four times the co-efficient of the first terın (that
(97.) Let x be the value of the livery.

is, of *"), and we have Then x + 23 is his 7 months' wages,

4x + 984x = 25920; Aridx + 8 his 12 months' wages.

we next add to both sides of this equation, the square of the Whence x +8: x + 21 :: 12:7, per question.

co-efficient of the second term (that is, of x) in the former Or, 12.x + 32=73 + 56;

equation, and we have And 5x = 24,

4.1? +984x + (246)= 86436; Therefore x = = 43, or £4 16s.

we now extract the square root of both sides of this equation, (98.) Let u be the weight of the body.

and we have Then 9 + 4x is the weight of the head.

2x + 246 = 294;
Whence r = 9+ 3x + 9, per question,

Whence by simple equations, we have
Or, dx = 18,
Therefore x = 36, 9 + x = 27,

Therefore cte=30.
And 36 + 27 +9 = 72.

Also,

= 5 yds, or 15 feet, (99.) Let a be the time A takes alone.

And

= 4 yds, or 12 feet.
Then A, and B. perform
1

We have thus completed the solutions of the whole Cen-
per day,
8
tenary of Problems given in No. 101, pp. 342—315.

Many of
our students will recognise their own solutions, of which we
1

have freely availed ourselves, in order to encourage then to
proceed in this interesting study; but it was impossible 10

particularise the names of all the students who solved every
1

individual problem, otherwise we should have filled a whole

number with their names repeated from fifty to 100 times,
8

We give, however, in the following list, the names of those
Again, A. and C. perform
1

who succeeded in their solutions, and the number of problems
9

which they solved :

H. D. Davis, Maida Hill, 100 problems; James Wardle,
1 1

Dean Mills, Bolton, 94;* James Russell, Chislehurst, Kent,
90; Simplicitas, Wemyss, Kirkaldy, 97; W. Pardoe, Lye,

61; Antodiductos, Knottingley, 60; J. Buchanan, Murray.
Lastly, B, and C. perform
1

field, Edinburgh, 50; R. Parkinson, Everton, 50; W. Ward,
10

35; D. Hornby, Driftield, 31; M. C, Gascoigne, Amersham.

road, New Cross, 30; John Pogson, Quick View, Mossley, 30;.
1 1

A. Sorr, Highgate, 21; W. Kérslake, Carlisle, 25; J. II.
10
per day,

Eastwood, Middleton, 24; G. Smith, Manchester, 19; T.

Bocock, Great Warley, 16; T. K. B., Stalybridge, 15; J. 1

Johnson, Marske, 13; J. Jenkins, P mbroke Dock, 12 ; J. 10

per question. Redfern, 12; Anna Pringle, Ferry Hill, Duchain, 3; W.
1 1

Martin, New Swindon, 7; A. Smith, Marske, 7; J. Marchall,
1
10
+
S

• Mr. Wardie solved 18 problems in pp. 329, 330, vol. iv.

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Sandyford, Newcastle, 6; T. Grisdale, Penrith, 6; J. Wilkin

The Falling followed by the Rising. son, Guildford, 6; E. Lowe, Cheshire, 4 ; J. Parker, Norfolk,

1. “I would rather gò than stay." 4; J. Verini, Welbeck-street, 4; G. Fox, Bedford, 2; and

2. “ I would rather walk than ride." W. Cotcheifer, West York Militia, 1, the last, which is an

3. “He travelled for health, not pleasure." adfected quadratic. It is proper to remark that some of those

4. “He pronounces correctly, not incorrectly." who solved the fewest, selected the most difficult; and thus

5. “ It is the falling, not the rising inflection.” they showed that they were able to do the rest. The result of these solutions is, on the whole, very gratifying to us, as

Examples of Circumflex. many of the students have assured us that they never had any

Tone of Mockery. “I've caught you, then, at lâst !" instructions in algebra, but what they received in the P.E.

Irony. “ Courageous chief!-the first in flight from pain!" It shows, also, that our national system of education has

Punning. " And though heavy to wèigh, as a score of fat been very successful.

sheep,

He was not, by any means, heavy to sleep.”
LESSOXS IN READING AND ELOCUTION.

Example of Monotone.
No. X.

Ave and Horror.
ANALYSIS OF THE VOICE.

“ I could a tāle unföld whose lightest word
| VIII.-CORRECT INFLECTIONS.

Would hārrow ūp thy soul, frēeze thy young blood, * INFLECTIOX' in elocution signifies an upward or downward

Māke thy two ēyes, like stārs, start from their sphērer, *slide' of voice, from the average, or level, of a sentence.

Thy knõtted and combined locks to pârt, There are two simple inflections' or 'slides,'--the upward

And each particular hāir to slānd on ēnd, or 'rising,' and the downward or “falling. The foriner is

Like quills upon the frētsul pòrcupine," usually marked by the acute accent [']-the latter, by the grave accent ().

Rules on the Rising Inflection. The union of these two inflections, on the same syllable, is

RULE I. The intensive' or high rising inflection, expresses called the circumflex,' or wave. When the circumflex com. mences with the falling inflection, and ends with the rising, it surprise and wonder.. Example. — * Há! laugh’st thou, Lochiel, is called the 'rising circumflex, —-{marked thus']; when it my vision to scórn?”. begiris with the rising, and ends with the falling, it is called Rule II. The moderate rising inflection takes place where the falling circumflex,'-(marked thus ^].

the sense is incomplete, and depends on something which fol. When the tone of the voice has no upward or downward lows. Example.-* As we cannot discern the shadow moving slide, but keeps comparatively level, it is called the 'mono- along the dial-plate, so we cannot always trace our progress tone,'--marked thus -).

in knowledge. Examples. Rising in flection :--Intensive,' or high, upward Note. Words and phrases of address, as they are merely slide, as in the tone of surprise, “ Ha! Is it possible !" In introductory expressions, take the moderate rising inflection.

2. “Sír, I the usual tone of a question that may be answered by Yes or Example 1. -"Friends, I come not here to talk." No, " Is it really so " Moderate' rising inflection, as at the deny that the assertion is correct." 3. “Soldiers, you fight end of a clause which leaves the sense dependent on what for home and liberty !” follows it. “If we are sincerely desirous of advancing in Exception.-In emphatic and in lengthened phrases of address knowledge, we shall not be sparing of exertion.” “Slight' the falling inflection takes place. Example 1.-"Ön! ye rising inflection, as when the voice is suddenly and unex- bràve, who rush to glory or the grave !” 2. • Soldiers ! if my pectedly interrupted: "When the visitor entered the room_" standard falls, look for the plume upon your king's helmet!".

3. “My friends, my followers, and my children! the field we The last mentioned inflection may, for distinction's sake, be have entered, is one from which there is no retreat." 4. "Genmarked as above, to indicate the absence of any positive up- tlemen and knights--commoners and soldiers, Edward the ward or downward slide, and, at the saine time, to distinguish Fourth upon his throne, will not profit by a victory more than it from the intentional and prolonged level of the mono- you." tone.'

Rule III. The suspensive,' or slight rising inflection, Falling inflection :— Intensive,' or bold and low downward occurs when expression is suddenly broken off, as in the folslide, as in the tone of anger and scorn: “Down, soothless lowing passage in dialogue. insulter!"

Example. - Poet. “The poisoning dame - Friend. You The 'full' falling inflection, as in the cadence at a period : " All his efforts were in vain."

P. I don't. F. You do." The moderate' falling inflection, as at the end of a clause

Note. This infection, prolonged, is used in the appropriate which forms complete sense : “Do not presume on wealth; it tone of reading verse, or of poetic prose, when not emphatic, may be swept from you in a moment." “ The horses were

instead of a distinct rising or falling inflection, which would harnessed; the carriages were driven up to the door ; the have the ordinary effect of prosaic uiterarice, or would divest party were stated : and, in a few moments, the mansion was

the expression of all its beauty, left to its former silence and solitude." The suspensive,' or slight falling inflection, as in the mem.

Examples. bers of a series,' or sequence of words and clauses, in the

1. “Here waters, woods, and winds in concert join." same syntactical connexion : "The force, the size, the weight 2. “And flocks, woods, streams around, repose and peace of the ship, bore the schooner down below the waves."

impart." irresistible force, the vast size, the prodigious weight of the 3. “The wild brook babbling down the mountain's side ; ship, rendered the destruction of the schooner inevitable."

The lowing herd; the sheepfold's simple bell; 'Ile suspensive' downward slide is marked as above to disti: guish it from the deeper inflection at the end of a clause,

The pipe of early shepherd, dim descried or of a sentence.

In the lone valley ; echoing far and wide,

The clamorous horn, along the cliffs above;
TABLE OF CONTRASTED INFLECTIONS,

The hollow murmur of the ocean tide;
The Rising followed by the Falling.

The hum of bees, the linnet's lay of love, 1. “Will you gó, or stay?”

And the full choir that wakes the universal grove." 2. Will you ride, or walk?"

4. "White houses peep through the trees; cattle stand 3. “ Did he wavel for health, or for pleasure." 4. “Dues he pronounce corréctly, or incorrectly;"

cooling in the pool; the casement of the farm-house is covered 6,"Is it the nsing, or the failing infection;"

• Shouting tone.
+ See note b. p. 117.

mean

"The

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