Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

LETTER
XXX.

1592. Sept. 17.

were born. For it is infinite that Her Majesty hath been robbed, and that of the most rare things.

Whereas I wrote to your Lordship for £2,000, if we load the same ships with the goods, we shall not need to pay but part, and the rest at London. So I think one thousand will serve. Thus, in haste, I humbly take my leave. From Hartelbery, this Sunday morning. Your Lordship's humbly at commandment,

W. RALEGH.

If it please your Lordship to send commission to myself, Sir JOHN GILBERT, Sir FRANCIS DRAKE, Mr. KILLIGREW, Mr. CHRISTOPHER HARRIS, and Mr. PAYDEN, the customer; and TRISTRAM GEORGE,-because none 1 other dwell upon Saltashe river,—we [??] shall be able among their tenants to find out other things.

Xxxi.

TO THE LORD TREASURER BURGHLEY.

As printed by STRYPE (Annals, vol. iv. p. 177), from his own transcript of

the Original.

XXXI.

THE particularities of all done your Lordship shall LETTER receive from Sir ROBERT CECIL. If the like diligence had been used at Plymouth, where the Earl [of CUM- 1592.

Sept. 21. BERLAND]'s ships arrived : at Portsmouth, where the

To Lord Foresight arrived; at Harwich, where the Dainty Burghley.

(From arrived; as hath been here, their value of the Carack would then have resembled itself in some sort. But if mouth. ]

On the the Earl were presented, of voluntary gift, with so many

Spoils of thousands of pearls and diamonds, and these only from the 'Madre

de Dios.' 1 Misprinted by Strype some.'

· Strype reads 'and.'

LETTER
XXXI.

1592. Sept. 21.

such of his men as were abiding in the Carack, what is to be thought of the rest remaining ? His own ships I leave to your Lordship's discretion : and what was unpresented was of some account, if it had been recovered. For mercenary men are not so affectionate or religious, but that they can, with safe conscience, lick their own fingers.

What will be done hereafter, I know not; but I dare give the Queen ten thousand pounds sterling for that which is gained by Sir ROBERT CECIL'S coming down; which I protest before the living God, I speak of truth, without all affection or partiality, for (God is my judge) he hath more rifled my ship than all the rest; and yet she, only, stayed by the Carack, lost most men, most of all spoiled ; and only remaineth here under commandment. The rest are gone every one his way. And truly, my Lord, CROSS1 was most to blame, and dealt lewdly to leave the Carack, and afterwards to steal from Sir MARTIN (FROBISHER). I have always served him to my power; but his mad behaviour is too insolent in this action. Thus, with remembrance of my duty, I humbly take my leave, and remain most ready to do your Lordship all honour and service.

W. RALEGH.

1 Robert Crosse, afterwards a captain in the Cadiz expedition, and knighted.

XXXII.

LETTER
XXXII.

From

SIR ROBERT CECIL, SIR WALTER RALEGH, AND

OTHERS, COMMISSIONERS OF INQUIRY AT
DARTMOUTH, TO THE

THE LORD TREASURER BURGHLEY AND LORD ADMIRAL HOWARD. From the Original. MS. Lansdowne, lxx. No. 93. (British Museum). OUR duties to your Lordships most humblie remembred. Althoughe wee have no great matter to write to your Lordships, yet the opportunitie of this 1592.

Sept. 27. messenger makes us bolde to trouble your Lordships,

Sir R. thoughe by our last letters of the xxoth wee did Cecil, Sir

W. Ralegh, aduertize you of our proceedinges, and desired some and others,

to the understandinge of your pleasure whether wee shall be

Lord thinke us of unloading the pepper or no, of which, Treasurer

and Lord althoughe wee be not yet come to it by one whole Adnuiral. decke, yet woulde wee knowe some parte of your DartLordships mynde; because here be diverse shippes, as mouth, the Alcedo and others, being fitt shippes to assure the proceed.

ings of the transportacion, which woulde (if it were not for this Commis

sion reseruice) be gone eastwarde to their owners, who shall

specting loose the benefitt of their setting forthe againe, if here

the Madre

de Dios.' (uppon hope of fraughte) they shoulde be commanded to stay and then be disappointed; of which, for the first point, when your Lordships are resolved you may with more deliberacion advize to whom it may be solde, which we leave to your Lordships' consideracion.

Wee have examined Captain CROSSE's brother, whom the messinger wee did send for him did meet on the way betweene Bridgwater and Exeter; we have examined him uppon theise Interrogatories, and finde no more then here is sett downe. Sir JOHN BOROGHE arryved here yesternighte, whose chests voluntarilie he

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

hathe shewed, hearing of our diligent searche for them in his absence; and thoughe wee finde them no common chests, yet finding in them nether Pearle, Amber, Stone, Jewell, Hangings, Tapestrie, or riche stufie, wee have I lefte them in his owne keping, bothe because he assured us he had tolde Her Majestic of them, and also because wec finde he thinkes himselfe hardlie dealt withall, being Her Majesties Generall there, and a Gentleman of qualitie, not to be suffred to choose out and send from himselfe some suche present of them as may be acceptable to Her Majestie, to which wee founde reasone to assent, seing they were nothing in them but certaine China Taffataes and Damaskes, with painted Caffard for Quiltes, some Quiltes of White Callicute stitcht, and 2 or 3 parcells of suche white China Taffatae imbrodered with China golde as Mr. CANDISHIE broughte home; with certaine course gilt boxes, and a bunch of seede pearle.

Within 3 or iiij. dayes, wee shalbe able to give some estimat of the state of this Carricke, and wee shall knowe whither the inj. chests spoken of be ether gone or ryfled ; which being done, I, ROBERT CECILI, doe purpose to come away, with your Lordships' good favour: and thus for this tyme we most humblie take our leaves.

Ffrom the Tonne of Dartmouthe, the xxvijth of
September, 1592.
Your Lordships most humblie to commaund,

RO. CECILL.
W. RUEGH.
FRA. DRIKE.
WILLM. KILLYGREWE.
RICII, CARM'DEX.

THOMAS MYDDELTOX.
Addressed :
To the right honorable our zery good Irrts, the Lord Ticusuror and

Lord Helmirall of Englat:

:

XXXIII.

TO THE LORD TREASURER BURGHLEY,
THE LORD ADMIRAL HOWARD,

AND THE LORD BUCKHURST.

From the Original. Domestic Correspondence: Elizabeth, vol. ccxliii. $ 89

(Rolls House). In the hand of an amanuensis, with autograph subscription and signature.

Dec. 13.

MY VERIE GOOD LORDS,
I UNDERSTAND by Mr. MIDDLETON of your Lord- LETTER

XXXIII. ships' proceedings in the cause between CORSINA1 and

1592. us; and although it be prejudiciall unto us, yet in reguard your Lordships have so prescribed, I am con- To Lord tented to submitt my selfe thereunto. And do hum- Burghley

and others. blie pray your Lordships that theis enclosed articles From

Durham may (if you shalbe so pleased) be performed by such House. as particularlie are nominated therein by your Lordships' On Proorder. Thereby CORSINA is to have the benefytt of ceedings

pending in making sale of the goods, which are valued at £12,000, the Court

of Admiand the use of the money, which wilbe worth unto him ralty. £3,000. In my opinion, if your Lordships will allow thereof, it were more fytt that the goods might remaine, as presently they do, in sequestracion, untill your

1 Filippo Corsini, plaintiff in an Admiralty cause respecting the ship Uggera Salvagnia.'

· The enclosed “Articles” (eleven in number) referred to in, and returned with, Sir Walter's letter, are both too long and of too little interest to be here printed. The only article in which Ralegh is expressly mentioned runs thus: “And that Sir Walter Rawley, in the behalf of Captain Davies, shall enter into like bonds unto Corsini, in double the value of such goods as the said Davies can be duly charged to have taken forth of the said ship.” The date of this Inclosure is 10 Dec. 1592. These articles are followed by a series of charges and answers in the case, also of great length and minutevess.

« ForrigeFortsett »