The Southern Review, Volum 6

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A. E. Miller., 1830

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Side 166 - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Side 164 - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states, who are the parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them...
Side 100 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory, on this side idolatry, as much as any. He was (indeed) honest, and of an open and free nature; had an excellent phantasy, brave notions, and gentle expressions...
Side 115 - O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...
Side 176 - ... limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact, as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact ; and that in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states, who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining, within their respective limits, the authorities, rights,...
Side 165 - States are parties, as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact; as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact ; and that, in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the States, who are parties thereto, have the right and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits the authorities,...
Side 440 - On the other hand, it is perfectly clear, that the sovereign powers vested in the state governments by their respective constitutions remained unaltered and unimpaired, except so far as they were granted to the government of the United States.
Side 169 - With whom do they repose this ultimate right of deciding on the powers of the government ? Sir, they have settled all this in the fullest manner.
Side 180 - That to this compact each State acceded as a State, and is an integral party, its co-States forming, as to itself, the other party : That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers...
Side 170 - Who made you a judge over another's servants ? To their own masters they stand or fall.

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