Young Japan: Yokohama and Yedo, Volum 1

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Trubner & Company, 1880
 

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Side 41 - Gold! gold! gold! gold! Bright and yellow, hard and cold, Molten, graven, hammered and rolled ; Heavy to get, and light to hold ; Hoarded, bartered, bought, and sold, Stolen, borrowed, squandered, doled : Spurned by the young, but hugged by the old To the very verge of the church-yard mould ; Price of many a crime untold : Gold ! gold ! gold ! gold...
Side 80 - Kong, all such laws and ordinances as may from time to time be required for the peace, order, and good government of Her Majesty's subjects, being within the dominions of the Emperor of China...
Side 11 - The Samurai are the masters of the four classes. Agriculturists, artizans, and merchants may not behave in a rude manner towards Samurai. The term for a rude man is ' other-than-expected fellow ' ; and a Samurai is not to be interfered with in cutting down a fellow who has behaved to him in a manner other than is expected.
Side 17 - Indeed, in conducting all my business with these very sagacious and deceitful people, I have found it profitable to bring to my aid the experience gained in former and by no means limited intercourse with the inhabitants of strange lands, civilized and barbarian ; and this experience has admonished me that, with people of forms, it is necessary either to set all ceremony aside, or to out-Herod Herod in assumed personal consequence and ostentation.
Side 165 - Accordingly, though we travelled pretty fast ourselves, yet we often met the baggage and fore-troops, consisting of the servants and inferior officers, for two days together, dispersed in several troops, and the prince himself followed but the third day attended with his numerous court, all marching in admirable order.
Side 21 - Curacoa, and ask for Maraschino instead. The Governor himself was a man of a most jovial temperament. He indulged in constant chuckles, and rather reminded one of Mr Weller, senior. He seemed to consider everything a capital joke — even Lord Elgin's positive refusal to comply with his request to hand over the yacht at Simoda and remain at that place. He used every possible argument to carry his point, but without avail. He said he dreaded the consequences to himself, and chuckled ; still more did...
Side 169 - ... the motion of their bodies. The Norimon-men have their sleeves tied with a string, as near the shoulders as possible, and leave their arms naked. They carry the pole of the Norimon either upon their shoulders, or else upon the palm of the hand, holding it up above their heads. Whilst they hold it up with one arm, they stretch out the other, putting the hand into a horizontal posture, whereby, and by their short deliberate steps and stiff knees, they affect a ridiculous fear and circumspection....
Side 168 - One of these horses carries a large elbow-chair, which is sometimes covered with black velvet, and placed on trappings of the same stuff. These horses are attended each by several grooms and footmen in liveries, and some are led by the prince's own pages. 11. Two pike-bearers. 12. Ten or more people carrying each two baskets of a monstrous large size...
Side 49 - Harikari, to the edification of their pursuers — for it seems to be the law (so sacred is the rite or right, whichever may be the proper reading), that no one may be interrupted even for the ends of justice. These are held to be sufficiently secured by the self-immolation of the criminal, however heinous the offence, and it is a privilege to be denied to no one entitled to wear two swords. Other accounts say that their companions, as a last act of friendship...
Side 228 - ... to impede the passage of a road. ' Supposing this happened in your country travelling with a large number of retainers as we do here, would you not chastise (push out of the way and beat) any...

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