A Year's Residence, in the United States of America, Del 2

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Sherwood, Neely and Jones, 1819 - 610 sider
 

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Side 240 - Oh ! if to dance all night, and dress all day, Charm'd the small-pox, or chas'd old age away, Who would not scorn what housewife's cares produce, Or who would learn one earthly thing of use ? To patch, nay ogle, might become a saint, Nor could it sure be such a sin to paint. But since, alas ! frail beauty must decay...
Side 267 - State, attained the age of twenty-one years and resided in the town in which he may offer himself to be admitted to the privilege of an elector, at least six months preceding ; and have a freehold estate of the yearly value of seven dollars in this State ; or, having been enrolled in the militia, shall have performed military duty therein for the term of one year next preceding the time he shall offer himself for admission...
Side 128 - BBOWN, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " Sertorius : or, the Roman Patriot.
Side 128 - an Act supplementary to an Act entitled an Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Chart*, and Books to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the Arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.
Side 237 - ... the inhabitants are rich in gold, silver, and in all the necessaries and conveniences of life. They drink no water, unless at certain times, upon a religious score, and by way of doing penance. They are fed, in great abundance, with all sorts of flesh and fish, of which they have plenty everywhere; they are clothed throughout in good woollens; their bedding and other furniture in their houses are of wool, and that in great store; they are also well...
Side 276 - In all prosecutions or indictments for libels, the truth may be given in evidence, and the jury shall have the right to determine the law and the facts, under the direction of the court.
Side 240 - And, as to the men, who would naturally form your acquaintances, they, I know from experience, are as kind, frank, and sensible men as are, on the general run, to be found in England, even with the power of selection. They are all well-informed ; modest without shyness ; always free to communicate what they know, and never ashamed to acknowledge that they have yet to learn. You never hear them boast of their possessions, and you never hear them complaining of their wants. They have all been readers...
Side 240 - There are very few really ignorant men in America of native growth. Every farmer is more or less of a reader. There is no brogue, no provincial dialect. No class like that which the French call peasantry...
Side 267 - Every white1 male citizen of the United States, who shall have gained a settlement in this State, attained the age of twenty-one years, and resided in the town in which he may offer himself to be admitted to the privilege of an elector, at least six months preceding; and have a freehold estate of the yearly value of seven dollars in this State; or, having been enrolled in the militia, shall have performed military duty therein...
Side 296 - I have sometimes been half tempted to believe, that the Magpie first suggested to tyrants the idea of having a tithe-eating Clergy. The Magpie devours the corn and grain ; so does the Parson. The Magpie takes the wool from the sheep's backs ; so does the Parson. The Magpie devours alike the young animals and the eggs ; so does the Parson. The Magpie's clack is everlastingly going ; so is the Parson's.