The First and Second Lady Chatterley Novels

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Cambridge University Press, 6. jun. 2002 - 689 sider
D. H. Lawrence wrote his last novel, Lady Chatterley's Lover, three times, and it is the third version that has become famous. The three versions are in fact three different novels, varying in length, significant episodes, and even some of the main characters. This is the first critical edition of the two early versions of the novel. The text is printed from manuscript source, including numerous deletions and variations from early printed editions. An introduction traces the genesis, publication and reception of the novel, and there are detailed explanatory notes.
 

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Innhold

I
xxi
II
xxii
III
xxviii
IV
xxxi
V
xxxv
VI
1
VII
5
VIII
221
IX
571
X
579
XI
607
XII
687
XIII
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Side xviii - ... the forest, suddenly she started to tremble uncontrollably. The white torso of the man had seemed so beautiful to her, splitting the gloom. The white, firm, divine body with that silky firm skin! Never mind the man's face, with the fierce moustache and the resentful, hard eyes ! Never mind his stupid personality ! His body in itself was divine, cleaving through the gloom like a revelation.

Om forfatteren (2002)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

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